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Capital of Luxury and Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Je suis un grand artist, j’ai la couleur de Delacroix, et je compose. Une toilette vaut un tableau.

La Mode Retrouvée

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chacune de ses robes m’apparaissait comme une ambiance naturelle, nécessaire, comme la projection d’un aspect particulier de son âme.

Into the Twentieth Century

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Interviewed in 1903 about their favorite brand of corset, Mme. Réjane said, “pas besoin,” [no need] and Mlle Eve Lavaliére replied, “Je nien porte pas” [I don’t wear one].

Chanel and Her Rivals

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Sandwiched between two world wars, between Poiret’s harem and Dior’s New Look, two women dominated the field of haute couture—Schiaparelli and Chanel.

Fashion under the Occupation

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The house of Jacques Heim is no longer a Jewish house.

Ups and Downs of Paris Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Nous sortions d’une époque de guerre, d’uniformes, de femmessoldats aux carrures de boxeurs. Je dessinai des femmes-fleurs, épaules douces, bustes épanouis, tailles fines comme lianes et jupes larges comme corolles.ChristianDior, Christian Dior et moi (Paris: Amiot-Domont, 1956), p. 35. Translation in text by Valerie Steele.

Proportion and the Fashion Figure

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Sometimes the body takes over. Sometimes the garment takes over. Sometimes it is more equal. When the body takes over, as in a slinky gown, the garment does not come to life until it is on the body. When the garment takes over, as in a voluminous coat, the body is merely a hanger for the clothing. But many times, it is a combination of both.

The Fashion Face

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The 1920s was the age of the flapper. Women were much more emancipated than they were at the turn of the century. Makeup had a painted-doll look to it with Clara Bow and Gloria Swanson setting the style. There was an equal balance between the eyes and the lips, which were often cupid-bow-shaped and red. The eyes were shadowed and the brows rather thin. The cheeks were rouged, and at times a beauty mark was placed near the chin. The hair was sleek and bobbed, giving the head a very small look.

Shaping the Body

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

1 Notice the planes of the female body—out over the breasts, in underneath them, going in at the waist, and rounding out over the hips. You can observe how shadows form under the areas that curve in and disappear on the areas that extend out.

Menswear

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Women's clothes have been influenced by menswear as far back as the 1930s, when Marlene Dietrich was photographed wearing an adaptation of a man's suit. Additionally, Yves Saint Laurent has been designing tuxedo suits for women for the last 30 years.

Volume

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Skirts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

We have come a long way since skirt hems swept the ground and women were not allowed to show an ankle. Until the 1960s, skirt lengths were dictated by a handful of major designers, and women followed their lead. Long, to the knees, or as short as the law would allow, until recently the length of a woman's skirt has always been a major fashion issue.

Pants

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The origin of women wearing pants is not known, but as far back as the first century c.e., women from the Middle East and Asia were wearing some form of pants. In a more modern time, Amelia Bloomer, attempting to banish the corset in the mid-1850s, helped to conceive an outfit consisting of a short skirt that was worn over full trousers that were gathered at the ankles. These trousers were called “bloomers” after her. The bloomer costume had a rather short life, but helped to introduce the concep

John Galliano, Graduate Collection, “Les Incroyables” 1984

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

While studying languages at City and East London College in Whitechapel, London, John Galliano took various design and drawing classes. His tutors encouraged him to apply to the foundation course at Saint Martin’s School of Art (later Central Saint Martins). His application was successful, and through illustration courses he found fashion design. Outside of classes, Galliano worked as sales assistant at Topshop, as a dresser at the National Theatre, and learned tailoring skills as an apprentice f

John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1994–1995

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 1990, John Galliano moved from London to Paris. His early years in Paris are described as an ebb and flow, mostly determined by financial backing or the lack thereof. Cycles of decline and regrowth have since characterized the public perception of Galliano. After forgoing the previous season due to lack of funds, Galliano’s spring/summer 1994 collection was presented in the Louvre’s Cour Carrée to critical acclaim. In March 1994, pieces from the collection were celebrated in a Vogue editorial

John Galliano, Spring/Summer 1990

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The unexpected success of John Galliano’s graduate collection for Saint Martin’s School of Art in 1984 led to an account with the London department store Browns and opportunities for financial backing. Galliano immersed himself in the creative process, with little concern for business matters. In 1987 he was announced as British Designer of the Year; he would receive the award again in 1994, 1995, and 1997. Galliano had been active in the London club scene during his time at Saint Martin’s. This

John Galliano for Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear, Spring/Summer 1999

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In late 1996, after a relatively short tenure at Givenchy, it was announced that John Galliano would replace Gianfranco Ferré at fellow LVMH-owned Christian Dior. His arrival at Dior corresponded with the house’s fiftieth anniversary and Galliano’s first task was to create an haute couture collection. The show was staged in a recreated couture salon and featured Galliano’s signature theatricality. Drama of presentation later culminated with the fall/winter 1998–1999 couture show “A Voyage on the

Romeo Gigli

Rio Ali

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Rifat Özbek, Spring/Summer 1991

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Rifat Özbek’s spring/summer collection of 1991 exemplifies his ability to successfully commoditize the very essence of ethnicity without alienating the young, creative, Western urbanites who were his collaborators and would eventually become his customers. This situates him as an early agent in the emergence of a cosmopolitan aesthetic in fashion. As today’s industry becomes increasingly provincialized and the big four fashion capitals have to cede some of their influence to satellite sites, Özbe

A Brief Overview of Modern Designing

Karl Aspelund

Source: Designing. An Introduction, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Designers Speak

Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Futurism

Fruzsina Bekefi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This article examines futurism in fashion in the twentieth century and it will focus on the work of designers between 1970 and 2000. It characterizes the theme, its meaning, and relevance during different eras by charting its progression from the fashions promoted by Italian futurists to the utopian designs of the space age. It also explores how contemporary designers have interpreted futuristic trends. Futuristic fashion is shown to intimately reflect on the conditions of existence in years to c

“Coiled Corset,” Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, Fall/Winter 1999

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The “Coiled Corset” is an example of radical body adornment made by jeweler Shaun Leane for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection “The Overlook” (fall/winter 1999). Leane, who originally trained as a jeweler and goldsmith, first worked with McQueen in 1995, when he made silver watch chains for his “Highland Rape” collection (fall/winter 1995). His creative collaborations with McQueen soon propelled him to work with new materials and on a much larger scale to create elaborate body sculpt

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” Trousers

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” trousers caused a sensation as one of the most provocative designs of the 1990s. McQueen redefined the silhouette with the Bumsters by cutting the waistband two inches below that of hipster trousers to elongate the torso and expose the lower spine and top of the buttocks. Although a prototype pair was made in late 1992, Bumsters first appeared on the catwalk in McQueen’s inaugural show, “Nihilism” (spring/summer 1994). Reappearing in collections including the controv

Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

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