Results: Text (7) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Cowl Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Cowl designsA cowl features deliciously draped necklines or underarm areas that have falling, soft folds. Cowls are draped on the bias, usually in lighter, finer fabrics to enhance a soft, harmonious look. A Bodice and blouse designscowl blousecowl blouse or dress design can be draped subtly or to add imaginative zing to an otherwise low-key garment. When draping a cowl design, the drape should be done in the same fabric weight as the finished design.

Necklines

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When drawing any neckline, you must be aware that the shape is going around the neck completely and that it relates to the shoulders and chest area as well. As you can see from the turned and profile views of the neck, it is also higher in the back than the front.

Drapery, Bias, and Cowls

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draped garments usually involve the direction of fabric called the bias. Fabric is woven with a crosswise and lengthwise direction. The bias is the diagonal direction extending across the grain of the fabric. The bias has a round, very elastic quality. It also has the ability to cling and fall and follow the curves of the body in a very sensual way.

The Skill of Couture Draping

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Grainline refers to the orientation of the yarns in a woven fabric. The lengthwise grains run along the length of the fabric and are called the warp yarns. The yarns that are woven in and out perpendicular to the warp yarns are called the weft yarns. These run side to side forming the cross grain of the fabric. The weft yarns are woven to form selvage on both sides of the fabric. The selvage is a finished edge that is formed by the weft yarns being woven, rotating side to side. (Figure 5.2)

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Necklines

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Lowered necklinesare below the basic neck seamline. The designer can produce any shape neckline and lower it to any point desired on the basic sloper. Front and back necklines often are not lowered the same amount. When one neckline is lower the other remains relatively high. Low, plunging necklines need an accompanying high neckline, or a fitted underbodice, to keep the garment from falling off the shoulders. Necklines lowered 2 inches or less are created by a designer by drawing the new neck de

The Collar

Injoo Kim and Mikyung Uh

Source: Apparel Making in Fashion Design, 2002, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The collar is an element that is attached (permanently or removably) to the neckline of a garment and that can be functional, purely ornamental, or a combination of the two. A collar can enhance the appearance of a blouse, dress, or jacket by adding a point of focus or interest. Proximity to the face plays an important role in establishing the significance of a collar as a design detail.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1