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Fashion Accessory Display

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

settingOne way to show fashion accessories is to make them part of the total look. This provides the shopper with a setting, or background, for those accessories, creating a sense of time, place, and occasion—and a distinctive and memorable style. The difference between a dress or suit carefully fitted on a form and the display of that same garment accessorized with a scarf, jewelry, and a bag slung over the shoulder, along with the right style and color of shoes, is the difference between “just

Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Footwear has always had a place in history and literature. From childhood, we read about gallant heroes in seven-league boots, princesses in glass slippers, Mercury with winged feet, and, of course, the magic ruby slippers that took Dorothy from the Land of Oz back home to Kansas.

Accessories

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A hat is the accessory worn on top of the head. A hat may fit the head, be pulled down over the eyes, or almost look as if it were just sitting on the top.

Accessories

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The manufacturers of accessories must constantly forecast the changes in cycles of fashion so that their accessories are perfect for new fashions. This includes not only the changes in silhouette but also fabrications and color. The marketing of accessories gained an enormous boost with the entrance of well-known designers’ names into the business. Today, the fame of the accessories designer is as important as the fame of the clothing designer; in many cases, it is the same famous name.

Design with smart textiles

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Our possibly utopian hope is that e-textile design can, over time, become a means through which hobbyists, craftspeople . . . and children can become technologically fluent—and can express themselves creatively.

Specialist collections

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Trends within the area of children’s fashion are subtle, but color, shape, and thematic influences combine to create a niche fashion movement that often reflects mainstream design in fashion and beyond. This is a continually growing market, with the current tendency for consumers to buy new rather than hand-me-down, although the sustainability agenda may change this.

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Handbag from the 1970s to 2000

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The need to collect, carry, and contain one’s belongings has existed for as long as humanity. From sacks to hold prehistoric flint and pouches for early coins to purses with contemporary cosmetics, various types of handbags have appeared in art and writing throughout history. While always fulfilling a practical function, handbags have also evolved with changing needs. They can be signifiers of fashion, social status, and even psychological state, as they mediate the boundaries between interior an

The Chanel “2.55” Handbag, Fall/Winter 1995

Julia Rea

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Since its introduction in February 1955, the “2.55” handbag has formed an integral and enduring part of the House of Chanel’s stylistic vocabulary of accessories. Its recurring role as an immediately recognizable and iconic symbol of both the brand’s unique heritage and contemporary identity is a rare example of a fashion object that embodies a contradictory blend of permanence and continuous renewal. By examining the historical context of the 2.55 bag through the lens of a contemporary version,

Chapter fourteen: Fashion Accessories

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Glamorous is a state of mind, a feeling of self-confidence.

Neurovision

Jovana Mirabile

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

With a clear vision of what was to be achieved in terms of silhouette, this stage entered into a linear process. Jovana draped on the dress form with the final fabric, seeking to capture the idea of prints, pattern and texture enveloping the body. (This approach is atypical to the usual process where one works in calico or muslin to avoid mistakes.) No pattern cutting was involved at this stage. Using sketches and photos of 3D concepts as guides for overall shape, this organic process was open to

Accessories

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

These accessories are drawn in a freehand style. Jewelry design sketching can be done in a more formal style on graph paper in order to control size and placement or can be drawn on a form to display fit and proportion. Here are some basic guidelines for drawing jewelry:

Highlights in the History of Accessories from Ancient Times to the Present

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter One traces the history of accessories as they developed in the Western world from ancient Egypt through the twentieth century. After reading this chapter, you will be able to identify and describe features of accessory design throughout history that can inspire your own designs.

Contemporary Accessory Designer Profiles

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Three profiles seven of today’s leading accessory designers and design firms—Miuccia Prada, Carlos Falchi, Nike, Christian Louboutin, Kate Spade, Jimmy Choo, and olsenHaus. After reading this chapter, you will understand how building and maintaining a strong brand image leads to success in this competitive design business.

Designing Handbags and Small Leather Goods

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book part

Introduction to Handbags and Small Leather Goods

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Five provides an overview of the handbag industry and the responsibilities of a handbag designer. After reading this chapter, you will be able to recognize and describe styles and components of handbags, travel-related bags, and small leather goods.

Inspiration and Research for Handbags

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Six explains how handbag designers conduct research and find inspiration. After reading this chapter, you will be able to identify research stages and goals, locate sources of inspiration, and choose design concepts, materials, and hardware. You will also learn how to build a mood board to present your completed research.

Designing, Sketching, and Presenting Handbags and Small Leather Goods

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Seven applies the design process to the creation of a handbag or small leather goods collection. After reading this chapter, you will be able to develop and edit designs according to a specific target market and brand identity. You will also appreciate the variety of techniques for preparing flat sketches and be able to present final ideas with both hand-drawn and computer-aided illustrations.

Tech Packs and Manufacturing for Handbags and Small Leather Goods

Aneta Genova

Source: Accessory Design, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter Eight describes the technical responsibilities of a designer of handbags and small leather goods. After reading this chapter, you will be able to trace the manufacturing process for handbags and small leather goods and understand how to use spec sheets and tech packs to communicate with manufacturing teams.

Anatomy of an accessory

John Lau

Source: Basics Fashion Design 09: Designing Accessories. Exploring the design and construction of bags, shoes, hats and jewellery, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

An accessory is an object that is worn on the body or carried by a person, yet is completely independent of the user. This powerful extension of the human form comes in thousands of different types of objects; generally speaking, however, the four main forms of accessories are the bag, footwear, jewellery and millinery.

Creative product development

John Lau

Source: Basics Fashion Design 09: Designing Accessories. Exploring the design and construction of bags, shoes, hats and jewellery, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Before you can begin thinking about researching your initial ideas in preparation for designing your own range of accessories, you first need to develop a good understanding of the design process, which we shall begin exploring in the sections that follow.

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