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Strategic Marketing in the Digital Age

Wendy K. Bendoni

Source: Social Media For Fashion Marketing. Storytelling in a Digital World, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this chapter, we will take a closer look at social media marketing’s role in integrated marketing communication strategies, social influence marketing, and affiliate alliances. Through interviews with digital and marketing industry leaders, we will learn the steps involved in the planning stages of a digital strategy and the growth of influencer power. We will also evaluate how brands and retailers approach strategy development, execution, and assessment of their marketing efforts across multi

Superman: Codifying the Superhero Wardrobe

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superman’s othernessotherness is firmly established in a costume that is identical from day to day. Wearing only one costume, Superman reduces his core values to a single, consistent message which is not compromised by daily adjustments to his wardrobe. This kind of “distinctive persistent dress,” finds Gregory Stone (1981, p. 144), is more commonly associated with professional responsibilities than with personal identity, and so through consistency of dress, Superman presents himself as acting i

Identity, role and the Mask

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The function of a costume or mask is to “disguisedisguise, protect or transform” (Wilsher, 2007, p. 12). For superheroes, the mask serves all three of these functions. It identity constructionreligiontransforms the wearer from ordinary civilian to superhero, disguising him in order to protect the identity of his alter ego, and those he cares about. The duality of the superhero’s identity is bound up in his costume. His public face, the mask, conceals his private face, hidden underneath.

Evolution and Adaptation: Form versus function

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superheroes are immediately identified as extraordinary by their costumes. These costumes are, in contrast to the civilian clothing of their alter ego, colorful, bold, figure-hugging, and often seemingly impractical. At first glance, they may print (comics)accuracyappear ludicrous, but their origins reveal aspects of these costumes to be both necessary and plausible.

Wearing the flag: Patriotism and Globalization

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Captain AmericaCaptain America was created as a defender of the values of the United States of America. His appearance resembles those of Olympians, for whom national allegiance becomes the defining factor in the design of their uniforms. When they inject Steve Rogers with a serum to give him super-powers, the American secret service intend that his supernatural athleticismathleticism will be used in combat, on behalf of the US Army. He is dressed in a flag-like costume, and introduced to the wor

Dressing up, dressing down: A spectacle of otherness, and the ordinariness of the civilian alter-ego

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

™ and © DC Comics

Channeling the Beast

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

physiognomyImages depicting animals with human characteristics, and hybrid animal-human beasts, were a staple of ancient religion and mythology. Sometimes, they were deities, like Bastet, the feline goddess of Ancient Egypt, and at other times they were the monstrous product of animal/human coupling, like ancient Crete’s Minotaur. These historical animal-human hybrids had a special power and allure. The duality of this fusion of “human and the non-human” can be frightening, or at least unsettling

Superheroes and the fashion of being unfashionable

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Those superhero costumes that remain most static over time are largely symbolic. When costumes are utilitarian, as with Iron Man (character)Iron Man’s suit, extreme transformation is justifiable as a technological development. By contrast, the costumes of Superman (character)Superman and Wonder WomanWonder Woman, which do little to enhance their performance, remain relatively consistent. Such garments function through stylistic or, following Barthes, RolandBarthes, linguistic expression, more tha

Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Real-life superheroes

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The appropriation of the superhero costume often comes in conjunction with the performance of a superhero lifestyle. Masked vigilantes patrol the streets of cities including Seattle, Atlanta, New York, Toronto, MexicoMexico City, and London, and congregate in cyberspace via the World Superhero RegistryWorld Superhero Registry. Though they are too numerous to list here, those real-life superheroes that have been the subject of academic study include Phoenix Jones, PhoenixJones, who patrols the str

Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Iron Man

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

upgradestechnologyinsigniacivilian alter egoidentity constructionOnce a costume is established as a representation of a certain set of values and abilities, the superhero identity can become more attached to the costume than to its wearer. In the case of Iron Man, identityidentity is more bound up in the costume than with any other superhero. Indeed, Iron Man is not a man, but an augmentation.

The X-Men

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

identitycustomizationconformitycolorReynolds (1992, p. 26) observes that all superhero costumes function “as a uniform, binding together all super-beings.” The superhero uniformuniform asserts his readiness to perform acts of heroism, and aligns him with crime-fighting values. Costume “creates a community between its wearers” (ibid.), communicating to audiences that even the most isolated or rebellious superhero conforms to a core set of ideals that define the superhero genre. More so than other

David Bowie

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

David Bowie is the musician most closely associated with glam rock, a genre of music that enjoyed great popularity in the 1970s, particularly in the United Kingdom. Glam rock was more than just music: it was about epic, elaborate concert productions, exuberant costumes and makeup, and playful exploration of gender identity. Bowie was born Robert David Jones on 8 January 1947 in Brixton, London. In the late 1960s, Bowie began a career as a psychedelic folk rock singer with several singles and the

Léon Bakst

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Léon Bakst (1866–1924), while not a style icon in the conventional sense, is well known to have profoundly influenced fashion throughout the twentieth century. Vanity Fair declared as early as 1914 that Bakst “has done more to revolutionize costume than any man since Adam.” His vibrant designs for the costumes and settings of the Ballets Russes in the period between 1909 and 1922 have enduringly inspired fashion designers to a substantially higher degree than his less well-known work in couture o

Marilyn Monroe

Joanne B. Eicher

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Marilyn Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortenson, sometimes using Baker (1 June 1926–5 August 1962), began her career as a model. Signing a film contract in 1946, she played minor roles, receiving attention for her beauty, curvaceous body, and mode of dressing. With prominence, she became a sex symbol. She adeptly helped create her visual persona by learning makeup and strategic wardrobe techniques. She relied on costumers like William Travilla to help construct her image in films like Gentlemen Prefer

Dress and the Arts

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Koji Tatsuno

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Fashion Styling, Photography, and Costume Design

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A retailer, manufacturer, designer, or organization may contract an independent firm, the fashion show and event planning company, to do all or part of this work for a fee. In general, the fashion show and event producer manages fashion shows and special events for its clients. The company works with each client to determine the type of event, intended purpose, designated audience, and the budget. The company may be contracted to handle part or all of the advertising and public relations, which c

Fashion Curatorship and Scholarship

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé opened their haute couture house in 1962. During 40 years of creating fashion, Yves Saint Laurent used what was considered traditional masculine styling to bring women self-assurance and power, while preserving their femininity. His designs are part of 20th-century history, reflecting women’s emancipation in every domain, from personal to social to political. Yves Saint Laurent invented the modern woman’s wardrobe: the pea jacket, trench coat, the first women’s

Luciano Soprani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Giorgio Armani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Subversive Representation: Vernacular, Dress and Morality

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

radical notions, of jazznewspapersnegative portrayals of jazzmedianegative portrayals of jazzjazzradical notions of“Hiawatha”threatblack men asragtimerejection by black aristocracyragtimeand refined art/classmenblack/as threatfearof the Negrocommunitiesblack/and the churchclassblack aristocracychurchand black communitiesblack communities, and the churchblack aristocracyaristocracy, blackEarly jazz, including ragtime and blues, found fruition at a time of social, political and economic change in A

Antony Price

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Dancewear on the Catwalk, 1970s–2000s

Katerina Pantelides

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This article describes the influence of dance practice and performance clothing on fashion ca.1970–2005. It begins with an exploration of historic correspondences between fashion and dance, and then considers how the so-called “dance boom” in 1970s New York, which flooded both the City and fashion editorial pages with professional and amateur dancers, inspired fashion designers, photographers, and stylists to blur the boundaries between dance practice wear and quotidian dress. The article also de

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