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Introduction

Adam Geczy

Source: The Artificial Body in Fashion and Art. Marionettes, Models, and Mannequins, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

PlutarchHegel, Georg, Wilhelm FriedrichZizek, SlavojIt is not difficult to credit that statues may have appeared to ooze with sweat, shed tears, or exude something which resembles drops of blood, since wood and stone often gather a mould which produces moisture, and not only display various colours themselves, but take on other tints from the atmosphere, and there is nothing to prevent us from believing that heaven sometimes employs such portents to foreshadow the future. It is also possible that

Genetically Baroque Beings: Cybergender, Transexuality and Natrificiality

Adam Geczy

Source: The Artificial Body in Fashion and Art. Marionettes, Models, and Mannequins, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Take La CicciolinaLa Cicciolina. Is there any more wonderful embodiment of sex, of the pornographic innocence of sex? She has been contrasted with MadonnaMadonna, the virgin product of aerobics and a glacial aesthetic, devoid of all charm and sensuality, a muscled android, ripe for precisely that reason for conversion into a computer-generated idol on account of the strange deterrence she generates. But, if we think about it, is not La Cicciolina also a transexual? Her long, platinum-blonde hair,

Conclusion: Future Directions And Possibilities in Footwear Studies

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I initially came to Japan as a teacher. I wanted to be here because there are great sneakers in Japan. Then friends back home started asking me to buy some pairs that are found only in Japan. I started getting so many orders, and I became so busy that I had to quit my teaching job. I now buy and sell sneakers full-time in Tokyo.

Punk Style Past and Present

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

leatherbeltshooded sweatshirt (hoodie)craftreconfiguredcolorblackapparelself-identified punkWhat is punk dress and how did it get that way? For some punk style is an obvious reference to green mohawkmohawk hair, a leather jacket, plaid plaidpantspants, and bootscombat bootscombat bootsboots. For others it is an oversized hooded sweatshirt and jeans, clean white shoes, and a wallet accessorychainchain. Some say it is a current caricaturecaricature logosof bandsof a dead movement while others say i

Dress and Cultural Aesthetics

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As discussed in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the predominant phenomenon that explains why humans behave in the ways they do, including the behavior of dressing. Cultural mentifacts (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values, ideology) and sociofacts (e.g., social organizations including religious, education, government, family structure) help to explain cultural artifacts (e.g., clothing, appearance products, houses, household goods, vehicles, tools, equipment). In this chapter, we explore lev

Dress and Cultural Rituals

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As noted in Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” culture is the way that humans organize their world. It is the fundamental determinant of how we live as we do and how that life is shaped. When we contemplate how our lives are shaped, and how our lives are different from the lives of others, we see that they are shaped by our values and view of the world, our lifestyles, our traditions, and the products of human workmanship that we use and that surround us.

Why Study Dress?

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dress is one of the most interesting aspects of human behavior we can study. Everyone in the world “dresses” their body. Dress has long been a means to communicate information about the self to others, to express the self creatively, and to protect the self from physical and psychological harm.

Origins and Functions of Dress

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Using our working definition of dress to include all body modifications and body supplements, people have dressed for hundreds of thousands of years (Anawalt, 2007). While early records are not as accurate or as complete as records since the invention of the written word, and early evidence of dress has often been partially destroyed by the passage of time, we still have very strong evidence of the beginnings of dress and the role it has played in human behavior. This is a rich area of study that

Conducting Research on Dress

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dressing the body is an important phenomenon to study. So how do we learn about this behavior? We all dress our bodies, so we all know something about the process from our first-hand experiences. However, when approaching any topic in a scholarly manner, it is important to gather facts, determine relationships, and offer explanations via an active, thorough, and systematic process. The name of such a process is called research. Conducting research involves the formulation of questions, the gather

Why Study Dress?

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In our daily lives, we often find ourselves in situations in which we have to assess others or make judgments about them, sometimes based on very little information. Those judgments have very powerful consequences. For example, jurors may make judgments concerning guilt or innocence based not only on defendant testimony but also on defendant demeanor and appearance. Recruiters may use physical appearance cues as they make their hiring decisions because new college graduates often have very simila

Dress and Impression Formation

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, we continue with the same general topic of social cognition. In Chapter 4, “Dress and Social Cognition” we introduced the concept of impression formation. In this chapter we expand our discussion on impression formation to include attribution, Implicit Personality Theory, impression management, and dramaturgy. We also include a discussion of role theory as it relates to social perception, look at the rise and fall in popularity of casual business dress, examine some of the behavi

Dress and Physical Appearance

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter we discuss aspects of our physical selves and dress. Two particular aspects of our physical selves affect our own and others’ perceptions of us; these two aspects are our faces and our bodies (shape or size) and both contribute to attractiveness. We will see that our faces and bodies also affect others’ behavior toward us, as well as our own behavior toward ourselves and toward others. Faces and bodies are stimuli in social cognition, or how we think, perceive, judge, and make inf

Dress and Body Image

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As you learned in Chapter 6, “Dress and Physical Appearance,” the body is a very important vehicle in the public presentation of oneself to others. We make assessments of others on the basis of body characteristics and configurations, we categorize others (often unknowingly) based on their body size, color, attractiveness, or other physical features, and we often make evaluations and judgments about their worth (real or imagined) once we have assessed and categorized them. The previous chapter we

Dress and Personality

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” we noted that why you look the way you do and the choices that you make to dress your body and thereby modify your appearance is a result of three major influences: the culture and environment that you are living in, the social groups that you participate in, and the combination of individual characteristics that make you a unique individual. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on an individual characteristic, the psychological concept of personality, and how

Dress and the Self

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How do you think about yourself on an individual basis? You may have ideas about yourself as a physical being. For example, you may like your weight but not your skin. You may love your hair but not your nails. You may also have ideas about yourself as a dressed being. How do you look in jeans? In a uniform? With your hair colored? You may also have ideas about your inner personality.Relationships between dress and personality as discussed in Chapter 8. What type of person am I? What do you belie

Dress and Identity

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 9, “Dress and the Self “ we said that the self is a dynamic interactive system of beliefs, feelings, and motives that characterize you as an individual. But because humans are complex, our selves are multi-dimensional. In the mornings you attend classes (i.e., you are a student), on weekends you play basketball with other members of your team (i.e., you are an athlete). To acknowledge this diversity, we say that the self is composed of several identities. It is important to understand

Dress and Socialization

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Key to the understanding of a society is the concept of social position. You will recall from Chapter 10, “Dress and Identity,” that every society, regardless of its size, is comprised of a set of social positions. For example, typically there are individuals who formally or informally lead the members of the society (e.g., Presidents, chiefs, executives) and those who follow (e.g., citizens, members, employees). This example has two simple social positions: Leader and follower.

Dress and Social Organizations

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Individuals who live and interact with each other and share a set of beliefs—that is, share a culture—make up the basic features of a society. A society reflects an association of individuals that makes human behavior and relationships between individuals somewhat predictable and that enables members to solve problems. By predictable, we mean that human behavior within a society is patterned and can be discussed in terms of several interrelated parts. The size of the association of individuals ca

The Classification System For Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Physical Appearance and Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Body, Dress, and Environment

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

The Art of Creating Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Ideals for Individual Appearance and the Art of Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Introduction to Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

After World War II, subcultures surfaced with prominence in urban spaces within Western culture (Thompson 1998). Scholars speculate that these subcultures formed because of shared issues and common needs that set them apart from mainstream culture and society (Cohen 1955). Over time, the term “subculture” gained negative connotations for four primary reasons. First, the very term “subculture” has a prefix of “sub,” which suggests something lower or below. Second, subculture members often come fro

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