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Designing your own smart textile

Sarah Kettley

Source: Designing with Smart Textiles, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

When working with complex and technological compositions, it is easy to get entangled in time-consuming functional details and thereby lose touch with the overall expression.

The Skill of Garment Embellishment

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Embroidery has been around for centuries in artwork and clothing and as a form of decoration. Embroidery was a popular way for women in the Victorian era to express their ideas and beliefs at embroidery circles, tea parties, or book readings or in the comfort of their own homes. Since hand embroidery was one of the simplest options, it was taught to younger girls in order to pass along the tradition, to grow their skills with age, and for mother/daughter bonding opportunities. The Victorian era

Valentino

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Yves Saint Laurent, Spring/Summer 1988 Haute Couture

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Throughout his career, Yves Saint Laurent famously drew inspiration from all of the fine arts, including painting, opera, the ballet, literature, poetry, and the works of Shakespeare. The influence of various painters on Saint Laurent’s creations dates back to his famous fall/winter 1965 “Mondrian Poliakoff” collection. His spring/summer 1988 collection, a tribute to cubism and impressionism and the work of Georges Braque and Vincent Van Gogh, was a natural fit into his oeuvre, with jackets embro

“Angie Dress,” Christian Dior by John Galliano, Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2000–2001

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The omnipresent significance of the eighteenth century and the masked ball for the House of Dior found expression in the design of “Angie” for the “Masquerade and Bondage” collection, a short variation on 1760s court dress, paraphrasing the fashionable life and cruel fate of Marie Antoinette. Using the surface of the hip panels as a canvas for narrative and caricaturized embroideries, the dress becomes an epitome of storytelling through dressmaking, evoking crucial episodes of French history. Gal

Carven

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Other Types of Textiles

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

While weaving and knitting are two major methods of producing textile materials, they are not alone. There are a number of other methods for producing textile materials, and although each of these represents a smaller percentage of total textile production, their total annual consumption amounts to many millions of yards.

Chloé

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Tomasz Starzewski

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Zandra Rhodes, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Rhodes’s spring/summer 1984 collection made its debut in London’s Ritz Carlton hotel. Having studied textiles before designing fashion, Rhodes’s garments utilize fabric with a high degree of detail and craftsmanship. This collection was no exception, with dresses made of embroidered chiffon, metallic sequined ensembles, and dresses encrusted with hanging pearls and crystals, all in pastel color schemes accented with blazes of magenta and deep cerulean. While a few typical 1980s body-conscious, sh

Norman Hartnell

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1990

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Two years after the acquisition of Givenchy by Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey (LVMH), Givenchy’s fall/winter 1990 collection struggled to negotiate its legacy as a couture line and produce designs to appeal to a contemporary clientele. Elements that had worked in favor of the house in the 1980s drew criticism. While other designers unstructured their silhouettes, Givenchy presented square shoulders on wool suits and evening wear alike. Gold lamé and organza dresses with short, dipping hemlines were

Surface Design

Erin Cadigan

Source: Sourcing and Selecting Textiles for Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

We live in a web of ideas, a fabric of our own making.

Neurovision

Jovana Mirabile

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Here, Jovana interpreted these questions within the context of customer and environment. While the initial idea was clear, how to translate and then execute this into a collection was not. In order to help define a direction, the concept of a muse was explored by collecting a variety of images that would identify the customer’s lifestyle (interiors, lighting, colour and editorial images). By exploring who ‘she’ might be, what ‘she’ would wear, and where ‘she’ would wear it, a more clearly defined

Pakistan

Nasreen Askari

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Pakistan, seat of one of the civilizations of the ancient world, was created as a country in 1947; historically, however, its location has made it a crucible in which influences from Greece, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, Central Asia, and China have fused with the indigenous traditions of the region. The regional dress and textile traditions of Pakistan, the Pathan, the Punjabi, the Baluch, and the Sindhi, have evolved a range of forms, techniques, and designs that is a distillation not only of loca

Tsonga Dress and Fashion

Rayda Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

All Tsonga in South Africa originate from Mozambique. A small group, they have a complex history involving various migrations and names; Tsonga now primarily denotes a language. In the early 1900s Tsonga women wore skirts made of imported cotton, and beaded jewelry. Later the skirts became shorter and fuller and are now made of wool. The main changes over the last century involve the upper body, the beaded necklaces worn in the 1930s giving way to blouses and T-shirts, worn with the minceka, two

Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Beaded and Embroidered Accessories of the Peranakan Chinese

Hwei-Fe’n Cheah

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Peranakan Chinese in insular Southeast Asia trace their ancestry to Chinese migrants who settled in the Indonesian archipelago and Malay peninsula beginning around the seventeenth century. Peranakan Chinese culture is a mix of Chinese and local elements. As Dutch and British colonial rules were reinforced in the Netherlands Indies and Malay Peninsula, European ideas significantly influenced Peranakan Chinese society in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The geographically dispersed

Miao National Minority

Gina Corrigan

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Today, the Miao ethnic minority live in southwestern China, their population totaling 8.9 million. Miao origins and migrations are controversial and poorly documented, but we know that attempts to subdue them have been difficult. Miao in remote mountain regions developed many garments, expressing cultural identity. In 2000 a book published in China illustrated 173 different styles of Miao dress. Following the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, the female population in the countryside again adopted trad

Slovak Embroidery

Oı’ga Danglová

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The oldest archeological evidence about embroidery in the territory of Slovakia dates to the third century b.c.e. In the Middle Ages, embroidery appeared on religious textiles and was worked by professional craftsmen. The first archive records about embroidery guilds in the territory of Slovakia date to the fifteenth century, referring to guilds of silk embroiderers in Košice and Bratislava. Inspired by the Renaissance penchant for luxury, embroidery was applied to clothing of the aristocracy and

Tiraz: Textiles and Dress with Inscriptions in Central and Southwest Asia

Margaret Anne Deppe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Central and Southwest Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The term tiraz comes from the Farsi word for “embroider.” In Arabic, the word tiraz means “embellishment” and, by extension, “fashion.” Tiraz describes the ornate Arabic script and associated designs on garments and other textile goods, as well as items adorned with them. Although inscribing the ruler’s name on textiles dates back thousands of years to pharaonic Egypt, tiraz is a distinctly Islamic form of decoration. Beautiful lettering was considered to be among the highest art forms in many cu

Kalabari Peoples of Nigeria

Joanne B. Eicher

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Kalabari Ijo have a long history as traders of cloth and apparel items in the Niger Delta. They traded with the world beyond their immediate boundaries of thirty-two islands found among mangrove swamps of the Niger River tributaries near the Atlantic Ocean. Their trading provided access to imported goods, particularly textiles, which they used and continue to use in creative ways. Rather than just borrow the textiles, they make them identifiable as uniquely Kalabari, a process that has been c

Azerbaijan

Lala Eldarova

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Azerbaijan lies on the western shore of the Caspian Sea, at the southeastern extremity of the mountainous Caucasus region. It has borders with Russia, Georgia, Armenia, Iran, and Turkey. The development of Azerbaijani national dress reached its zenith in the nineteenth century, with the emergence of its own unique style, with many features being common to all parts of the country. The principles, rules, and customs governing its design, cut, and the way it should be worn reflected the unity of th

Nonwovens And Other Methods of Fabric Construction

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The term nonwoven can be confusing because it has two definitions. In one sense, it refers to any textile that is not woven. This definition includes knits as nonwoven. More commonly, however, the term nonwoven is used in the textile industry to refer to any textile product that is created directly from fibers and is held together by bonding or entanglement. This second definition is the one used in this book. This chapter also presents other methods of fabric construction such as knotting, quilt

The Textile Tradition of Malaysia and Its Impact on Dress

Adline Abdul Ghani

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Maritime trade linked the Malay Peninsula to the world from as early as the first to the eleventh centuries. With the Indian Ocean to the west and the South China Sea to the east, the peninsula held a focal position along two major sailing routes. As an entrepôt connecting the East and West, the peninsula was also constantly exposed to new cultures, influences, ideas, technologies, and materials, and throughout history, trade activity in general has been inextricably linked to developments in loc

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