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Specialist collections

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Trends within the area of children’s fashion are subtle, but color, shape, and thematic influences combine to create a niche fashion movement that often reflects mainstream design in fashion and beyond. This is a continually growing market, with the current tendency for consumers to buy new rather than hand-me-down, although the sustainability agenda may change this.

Luciano Soprani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Giorgio Armani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Shoulder Pads

Jennifer Mower

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The 1940s and 1980s were two style periods where traditional gender roles were challenged as women entered or returned to the workforce in greater numbers than in the preceding years. In both periods, shoulder pads served as a visual representation of the changes to Euro-American society and culture. In the 1980s the padded look was seen on the runway in collections by postmodern designers like Thierry Mugler, Yves Saint Laurent, Claude Montana, and Giorgio Armani, who appeared to sometimes look

Jil Sander

Lauren Downing Peters

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Laura Biagiotti

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Regional Differences in Dress and Fashion

Nancy O. Bryant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion professionals believe that there are regional differences in dress and fashion trends in the United States and Canada. However, objective data are hard to find, as scholars have paid little attention to regional differences within these territories. National retail firms are likely to evaluate sales in different regions in order to provide a range of stock that will appeal to their customers. Trade publications report the sales volume of items in various regions. Fashion reporters use the

Dress for Success

Joanne Entwistle

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The exposition of the “rules” of business dress are laid down in dress manuals, such as the now-classic John T. Molloy’s two manuals, Dress for Success (first published in the United States in 1975) and Women: Dress for Success (published in the United States in 1979). These manuals describe his formula for “successful" dressing. What Molloy calls his “wardrobe engineering” is a (pseudo) “science of clothing” based on quantitative “testing” of the different meanings individuals give to individual

Conventional Work Dress

Colleen Gau

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Historically, climate and work environments are primary to the selection and production of work clothing, but safety concerns, economic and business climates, fashion, and ethics find a place in the clothing narrative of Western civilizations. As crops and animals were domesticated, empires emerged in the Nile and Mediterranean regions, and the classification of skill groups became more distinct. Animal skins were replaced by woven garments by the time people had settled into communities. Herding

Political Candidates and Dress

Susan B. Kaiser and Janet Hethorn

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In electoral politics, candidates face delicate balancing acts in matters of dress. They must represent (and therefore fit in with) the people they seek to serve; yet they also need to establish themselves as leaders who stand out/above. It helps to look good and dress well, but not to the extent that potential voters suspect the politician has little substance (and “only style”). Further considerations include the need not to appear too vain or self-absorbed. The ways in which political candidat

Class, Work, and Dress

Alexandra Kim

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

During the nineteenth century, clothing in West Europe was inextricably linked to a person’s class and occupation. Dress was constantly used to determine a person’s social status. Although there were obvious variations in occupational dress across the Continent, a worker’s clothing—whether in the countryside or the city—would have clearly indicated his or her place in the social hierarchy. Changing work patterns, a growing informality, and the fragmentation of the class structure in the twentieth

Dressing for Success: The Re-Suiting of Corporate America in the 1970s

Patricia A. Cunningham

Source: Twentieth-Century American Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

During the twentieth century until just after the Second World War menswear included formal traditional suits (single or double-breasted, the former usually worn with a vest), and casual dress for a variety of informal activities and school. Casual dressing for non-work occasions had increased during the pre-war years especially during the 1930s, when casual trousers worn with sweaters, tweed jackets and blazers became the prescribed look for many (Craik 1994: 190–5). Despite an increased desire

Dress for Success in the Popular Press

Jennifer Paff Ogle and Mary Lynn Damhorst

Source: Appearance and Power, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Dress helps individuals perform business roles (Rafaeli & Pratt, 1993). Role dress, such as the men's suit, has the familiarity and history to serve as a significant symbol for management and administrative roles in business. Men's business dress has undergone centuries of development since 1666, when Charles II of England proclaimed a simplified, ‘useful’ three-piece suit for men of the court, business, and commerce (Kuchta, 1990). Dress that is a significant symbol has high consensus in meaning

Clothing, Power, and the Workplace

Margaret Rucker, Elizabeth Anderson and April Kangas

Source: Appearance and Power, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

For a number of years, researchers have been asking questions about the role of clothing in the workplace (e.g., Form & Stone, 1955; Joseph & Alex, 1972). The majority of these questions fall into two general categories – what attitudes and practices are affected by differences in clothing and what characteristics or dimensions of clothing are responsible for these effects.

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