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The Basic Bodice

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Shoulder/waistline dart bodiceFitted waist seam bodiceShoulder/waist dart bodiceDart bodiceBodice sloper, basic;When a manufacturer develops a new clothing line, one of the first requirements is a set of foundation patterns (blocks or slopers). These foundation patterns should match the proportion, size, and fit of the target customer. They also provide the designer and manufacturer with a consistent fit, silhouette, ease allowance, armhole size, waistline measurement, and desired length.

Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesBodice and blouse designsThe bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Princess Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesPrincess designsvariations onPrincess designsA princess design has vertical seams that divide the bodice into separate panels. When these seams are sewn together, they take on the same shape as the bodice or blouse, but with vertical seams. Typically, a princess bodice has a close-fitting waist with an unbroken styleline that usually extends from the shoulder or armhole to the waistline. This style almost always crosses over the midpoint of the bustline (apex) a

Bodices

Elizabeth Liechty, Judith Rasband and Della Pottberg-Steineckert

Source: Fitting & Pattern Alteration. A Multi-Method Approach to The Art of Style Selection, Fitting, and Alteration, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

This chapter presents measurement, fitting, and alteration procedures on the upper torso and bodice.

Linings

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Vivienne Westwood, “Anglomania,” Fall/Winter 1993–1994

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

From being queen of punk in the mid-1970s, Vivienne Westwood slightly moved, from the 1980s, to being a supporter of British fashion’s establishment. Inspired by traditional craftsmanship and eighteenth-century art, the designer has since infused her collections with historicism. With her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” show, Vivienne Westwood epitomized her interest in English and Scottish traditions while mingling masculine tailoring with outrageously feminine forms. Featuring laced bodices,

Grading the Basic Pattern Blocks

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How to grade the basic block patterns is the most important skill in pattern grading. Because flat patternmaking is based on the use and manipulation of the basic sloper to create other apparel designs, learning to grade the basic block patterns will enable the designer to grade any other design that he or she creates. Learning where the grade is distributed in the basic pattern is imperative to grading other designs. The principles and concepts learned in this chapter will be applied in all of t

Sleeve/Bodice Combinations

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The bodice and sleeve patterns may be combined to produce new styles referred to as sleeve/bodice combinations. Although these styles are actually developed by combining two basic patterns, new grade rules are required when the pattern orientation is different from the basic blocks. For this chapter, new grade rules will be developed for all of the cardinal points. Some manufacturers may develop a new grade rule table for each new style, even though many of the new grade rules will be the same or

Design Variations and Effects of Grading on Garment Style

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By this point the reader should be familiar with the grade rules necessary to grade basic garment designs and how a grade is distributed through a pattern. A solid foundation in patternmaking is essential for a pattern grader. It is possible: if a patternmaker can grade a basic sloper, then he or she would be able to develop a garment pattern of any size by using a sloper of the selected size. This is the basic principle by which a patternmaker can use a computer-assisted drawing (CAD) system to

Grading with multiple x,y Axes

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Grading manually or by computer requires the movement of cardinal points in x and y directions on a Cartesian graph. The Cartesian graph was introduced in Chapter 3, where a single set of x,y axes was discussed. The procedure for moving the pattern along the axes is illustrated in Chapter 3, and grading examples of the basic blocks and other basic styles are given in Chapters 5, 6, and 7.

The Crinoline Period, 1850–1869

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume. Student Study Guide, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

The Crinoline Period 1850–1870

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The increasing width of women’s skirts had been leading to the use of multiple layers of stiffened petticoats. In September 1856 the editor of Peterson’s Magazine hailed the revival of the 18th-century hoopskirts as a means of holding out these voluminous skirts:

Basic Dress Foundation

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The dress is draped to fit the dimensions of the dress form or model, and bridges hollow areas between the bust, buttocks, and shoulder blades. Ease is added for comfortable movement without the appearance of stress. The sleeve's center grain should hang slightly forward of the front side seam, and in perfect alignment with a model's stance. The skirt hangs straight from the widest part of the hip and the hem is parallel to the floor. A number of darts control the fit of the garment by taking up

Bodice Styles

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The difference between the classic Princess design and the armhole Princess is in the change of direction for one part of the shared dart leg. Other variations of the armhole Princess are shown at the end of this project in Figure 17. There are many other design possibilities based on this principle.

Foundation Bodice

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The foundation bodice—also called the basic bodice—is used as the basis for the development of myriad bodice patterns in fashion design. The fit of the front and the back of the foundation bodice at the body curves is provided by one or more fitting darts. The darts originate at the seamlines of the pattern and always point to the fullest part of the body, such as the bust in the front and the shoulder blade in the back. The length of the darts is determined by their placement from the seamlines

Foundation Bodice Variations

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Mastering the fundamental techniques of draping the foundation bodice in Chapter 4 laid the groundwork for developing draping variations of the foundation bodice. Foundation bodice variations are accomplished by manipulating the dart excess of the foundation bodice on the dress form. Dart manipulation is the process of relocating the fitting darts to other seamlines on the bodice. The dart excess of the front bodice can be combined into one dart or divided between darts, then placed at one or mor

Dart-Equivalent Bodice Styles

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Other variations of the foundation bodice can be created by converting the dart excess of the fitting darts to dart equivalents. The dart-equivalent bodice styles presented in this chapter— such as the gathered waist bodice, flange dart bodice, and the princess bodice— are accomplished by converting the dart excess to gathers, open-end darts, or shaped seamlines, without changing the fit of the pattern. The dart excess can also be draped as dart-equivalent tucks, flares, pleats, or fully released

Bodice Designs

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter covers the principles of creating divided bodices, draping on both sides of the dress form, and developing patterns that cross the center of the form. Examples of separated bodices that are joined at the style line seams are the yoke and midriff looks. Designs such as the cowl bodice require that the style be draped simultaneously on each side of the front of the form. By draping beyond the center front seam of the form, asymmetrical designs are developed. Included in this chapter ar

The Māori Pari (Bodice)

Jo Diamond

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The pari is a Māori bodice of the rāranga type, worn with a piupiu (a type of fibrous skirt) and Māori jewelry by women in cultural performances including competitions, concerts, and festivals. Rāranga is a generic naming for plaited (as opposed to loom) handweaving practices undertaken mostly, though not exclusively, by Māori women. Māori performances usually occur in order to promote traditional practices, but for some they include a more material reward or prize money or are part of fund-raisi

Bodice Dart Manipulation

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In the following examples, analyze the flat design sketch by assessing the difference between the basic sloper dart location and the dart location for the new design.

Bodice Seamlines and Fullness

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Dart-equivalent seamlines are fitting lines that must point to, extend to, or cross over the pivot point to replace normal fitting darts. They provide shape and add design to the garment. Dart-equivalent seams may extend from one edge of the pattern to the other or incorporate the dart fold, only. They can cross the pattern in any direction, that is, vertically, horizontally, or diagonally; and, they can be any shape, such as straight, curved, or jagged.

Bodice

Bina Abling and Kathleen Maggio

Source: Integrating Draping, Drafting, and Drawing, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Accurate measurements are required to draft a bodice sloper. Carefully measure the dress form or human figure and record these illustrated measurements. The following pages provide step-by-step drafting instructions.

Bodice Variations

Bina Abling and Kathleen Maggio

Source: Integrating Draping, Drafting, and Drawing, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts, seams, gathers, and yokes are construction details that maintain the close fit of the bodice. Their placement greatly alters the look and style of the finished garment. The same is true for the grain of the fabric. Try cutting, draping, and drawing the bodice variations in a stripe. This experiment renders a range of effects.

Pattern Manipulation

Catherine Black

Source: Modaris and Diamino for Apparel Design, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The following commands are utilized in computer-aided pattern manipulation. The explanation of the commands includes a short description of the command and instructions for activating, implementing, and accepting a procedure or command.

Pattern Creation

Catherine Black

Source: Modaris and Diamino for Apparel Design, 2008, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

F1>Points>Developed places a point at a particular measurement. Click a point on a line of a pattern piece, then move the cursor to the new position and click.

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