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Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Making leather is a highly specialized and time-consuming operation. Because of the time involved, the leather industry must anticipate and predict trends far in advance of other textile suppliers. Leather producers typically decide what production method, textures, finishes, and colors they will use eight to sixteen months before a leather reaches apparel and accessory manufacturers. As a result, those in other fashion industries often look to the leather industry for leadership, particularly in

Minor Fabrications

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The fabrics in this category are made without yarn. Without yarns, there is no organized structure or thread count. Because yarn construction is labor intensive, fabrics made without yarns offer significant cost savings over those made with yarns. Additionally, nonwoven fabrics are often softer and more elastic than their woven or even knitted counterparts. The fibers are blown onto a collection surface and held together by entanglement (or needlepunching), heat fusion (if thermoplastic), or adhe

Surface-Specific Techniques

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Felted woven fabrics are shrunk and compressed with heat, moisture and friction to produce a dense appearance. Some of the better-known felted fabrics are loden, melton or fleece. The edges of a felted fabric do not fray, so seams can be left unfinished. It is most common to use a plain stitched seam with top-stitching or a welt seam for light- to medium-weight felted fabric. But there are many more techniques to choose from, such as the following:

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Leather and Fur

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Prehistoric people discovered that the animals they killed for food could serve another purpose, that of providing them with warmth and protection from the elements. Today, leather and fur are vital to the apparel, home furnishings, and automotive industries, contributing the raw materials for coats and jackets, handbags, shoes, gloves, and an ever-widening range of fashion products.

Ten: Quality, In the Nick of Time: Shinola

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Brand Story. Cases and Explorations in Fashion Branding, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A 2014 Economist article titled “Mo’ time for Motown” lightheartedly related the history of Shinola. Tom Kartsotis, the founder of Bedrock Manufacturing (named for the famous Flintstone’s cartoon’s home-town), bought the name for the company from a longtime brand of shoe polish (founded in 1907) that was best known for the slogan “You can’t tell shit from Shinola.” This was absolute perfection for Kartsotis, who believes that this company can someday become the largest manufacturer of high-qualit

Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Prada

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Consuelo Castiglioni

Giulia Bussinello

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Mulberry

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Gloves ‘of the Very Thin Sort’: Gifting Limerick Gloves in the Late Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Liza Foley

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Although leather was essential for the production of a wide range of eighteenth-century objects, including gloves, very little consideration has been given to the significance of the materiality of leather itself. As historian Giorgio Riello has shown, leather was a scarce material in pre-Industrial England. ‘Confined to the natural world and to a stable cattle asset’ (2008: 77), its production largely depended on the meat market, which, in the case of sheep, and to a greater extent cattle, accou

Louis Vuitton (house)

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Dyeing and Staining Fabric

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

To dye fabric means to create a chemical bath of a colorant dissolved into water. Fabric is submersed and agitated until the color is sufficiently absorbed—this is known as the immersion technique, or tub dyeing method, a reliable method for even distribution of dye. Often a mordant, or dye carrier, is needed to help the dye adhere to the fabric and to provide colorfastness. The dye binds with the fabric molecularly to create long-lasting, vibrant colors.

Discharging Color and Using Resists

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A negative image or pattern on a dark-colored fabric or leather can be created by removing color (Figure 2.1). Color removal can also be beneficial as an all-over lightener or used before applying other dyes or prints to provide a lighter base, thus creating more vibrant results.

Printing and Transfer

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Printing is the act of applying an easily repeatable pattern to fabric. It can be done on any fabric or leather as long as the dye or paint is appropriate to the fiber content of that fabric (see Appendix A, Burn Test, page 252). A wide range of printing techniques have been in practice for much of human existence. Simple repeatable images can be created using blocks or stamps, while screen printing achieves clean crisp lines on a larger surface area.

Fiber Manipulation

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Removing fibers from fabric can be done with a product known as Fiber Etch. It is made of sodium bisulfate, water, glycerin, and printing paste. It works by removing the cellulose fibers from fabric creating a devoré, or burnout, effect on mixed fiber fabrics, and will remove sections of natural (cellulose) fibers on fabric, creating a cut-out effect.

Embroidery

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Early needles and threads were used to sew together animal hides to make simple clothing and shelter, but eventually sewing evolved into a decorative craft. Embroidery developed throughout Siberia and the Middle East as early as the Bronze Age (4500–100 BC) and in China during the Zhou Dynasty (1100–256 BC).ClarkeSimon. Textile Design. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2011. It spread into Europe by the 12th century where it was found on religious banners and streamers bearing coats of arms. Embr

Embellishment

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Beading is the art of embellishing fabric by attaching beads. The methods are simple and are limited only by the designer’s imagination. Most needlework techniques can be adapted to beading with the right bead, needle, and thread.

Combining Techniques

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Video Tutorial: Combining Techniques

Performance, Technical, and Smart Textiles

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The strength of the United States textile industry is in the research and development of technology applicable to the marketplace. Efficient mill production of commodity textiles alone is no longer sufficient to insure a strong, vibrant business. To gain a competitive edge in the global textile market, continual investment in cutting edge technologies is the key to future success. This chapter focuses on processes and products that meet the criteria of unique and high value-added textile material

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Copperwheat Blundell

Michelle Labrague

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Tristan Webber

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

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