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Draping Principles and Skills

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Draping principles and skillsDraping is a technique in which DesignDesignersdesigners work with fabric, using a dress form or live model, draping and pinning the pieces together to develop the desired style. Draping is the oldest means of creating clothing. It is an art form in fabric. The techniques by which a designer works to develop a line may vary. Many designers prefer to use draping methods to create their original designs. This is because working with actual materials gives a designer gre

The Basic Bodice

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Shoulder/waistline dart bodiceFitted waist seam bodiceShoulder/waist dart bodiceDart bodiceBodice sloper, basic;When a manufacturer develops a new clothing line, one of the first requirements is a set of foundation patterns (blocks or slopers). These foundation patterns should match the proportion, size, and fit of the target customer. They also provide the designer and manufacturer with a consistent fit, silhouette, ease allowance, armhole size, waistline measurement, and desired length.

The Basic Fitted Skirt

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A basic fitted two-dart straight skirt is a fitted skirt with side seams parallel to the center of the skirt. The center front and center back are on perfect grain and the hip-level lines are on perfect crossgrain, allowing the area below the hip line to hang straight up and down. This skirt has a fitted waist area in which the excess fabric above the hip line is controlled by waistline darts. This skirt is considered the most important of all skirt drapes because of its versatility in creating m

Torso/Blouse Sloper and Basic Shift Silhouettes

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Torso/blouse sloperThe torso/blouse sloper and basic shift silhouettes have a bust-fitting dart and no waistline seam. The waist area can be slightly fitted with one or two fisheye darts, belted, or drawn in with elastic. The side seams hang slightly away from the body and are parallel to center front. By using the torso/blouse sloper, it can be lengthened to make a shift design. Many styles of pockets, plackets, yokes, necklines, collars, and/or sleeves can be used to create the individual style

Designing with Circular Flounces and Ruffles

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesFlounces, circulargathered ruffles andRufflesFlounces, circularFlounces, circulardesignsDesigns with a circular flounce are the stuff of romance. Flounces recall a mood of elegance with a rich, dramatic, graceful flare.

Image Consulting

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Image consultingImage consultantIn this chapter you will learn:

Fashion Lexicon: Terms, Icons, History, and Inspiration

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashioncommunication inIn this chapter you will learn:

How to Research Trends

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In trend forecasting we are not initially researching one particular area of interest, but gathering information on as many areas as possible. Even in fashion, one needs to be aware of what is happening in areas as diverse as politics and the economy. These areas are intertwined and ultimately influence fashion. Politics directly influences society and economics, which will ultimately influence spending. At times of economic uncertainty, spending goes down and also becomes more concentrated on es

Consumer safety and product labeling guidance

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The laws governing mandatory label disclosures have three broad and collective labellinggoalsgoals:

Emerging fashion industry issues

Deanna Clark-Esposito

Source: A Practical Guide to Fashion Law and Compliance, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The marriage between fashion and technology has led to the emergence of a new line of products dubbed as “fashion tech” or “wearable technology.” While the fitness space led the way for the market expansion of these products, such as with the FitbitFitbit®, other more cost prohibitive accessories such as Google GlassGoogle GlassGoogle Glass® (Figure 10.1), only enjoyed a short period of media hype prior to its steady decline. Products offering greater functionality, such as Apple, IncApple, Inc.’

Understanding Product Trends: What Customers Buy

Richard Clodfelter

Source: Retail Buying. From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

product line,As a buyer, you must plan and control the kinds of products that will be offered in your store or department. In other words, you must be concerned with the merchandise mix,merchandise mix—the types or mix of products that are available for customers to purchase. The merchandise mix that you select should meet the specific needs of your customers. It must be frequently monitored because an appropriate mix today might not contain the right products tomorrow.

Color and Texture

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

colorphysical and psychological reactions tocolor psychologyColor psychology is very important in visual merchandising. Many theories have been espoused concerning the effects of color on people and their moods while shopping. Color can immediately create a mood. Most of us have colors that tend to cheer us up when we are feeling down and colors that calm us. Each of us also has colors that can make us physically feel hotter or cooler. The problem for the visual merchandiser is that each person m

Textiles, trims, findings, and materials

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

trims forecastingtextiles forecastingmaterials forecastingfindings forecastingTextiles, trims, findings, and materials forecasting is a process of collecting, editing, interpreting, and analyzing information to be able to predict the textiles, materials, trims, and findings that will be popular in upcoming seasons. As in theme and color, forecasters research and use their creativity, instinct, and experience to sense tactile shifts. Consumers are greatly influenced by the feel of textilestextiles

Home Fashions

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The types of furnishings and household accessories in contemporary American homes are based primarily on models and ideas that the early European immigrants brought with them. Most of our beds and eating utensils, for example, are Western. But many of the fabrics and other material, the decorative patterns, and the objects themselves originated in the East and came to America through rather than from Europe. The Crusaders imported the rugs that covered the floors in medieval European castles, and

Textiles: Fibers and Fabrics

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A fiber—an extremely fine, hairlike strand almost invisible to the eye—is the smallest element of a fabric. It is also the starting point of a fabric. Fibers can be spun or twisted into continuous threads called yarn, and yarns can be knitted, woven, or bonded into fabrics. Though small and fine, fibers have enormous influence on fashion. They are what give a fabric its color, weight, texture, and durability.

Organization and Contents

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Portfolio casesentry-levelEntry-level portfolioThe entry-level portfolio for applying to a fashion design program usually consists of a prescribed format (designed by the college) to demonstrate design, rendering, and presentation skills. Whether you prepared the portfolio on your own or during a pre-college program, your interviewer will be looking for drawing ability, creativity and imagination, individuality/style/ personal vision, and an awareness of fashion. These are the criteria you will b

Presentation Concepts

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because Chapter 4 discusses organization and content, this chapter will primarily deal with the characteristic elements of a Fabric/color portfolio contentspresentation conceptspresentation, namely Mood/theme, presentation conceptsPresentation conceptsmood/thememood/theme, fabric/color story, design groups on figures, and flat presentations.

Children’s Wear Presentations

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT),Children's wear presentationsage and genderThe Children's wear presentationschildrenchildren’s wear designer must be aware of various age groups and their special requirements. From newborns to early teens, each group has specific needs determined by the developmental growth of the child and his or her physical abilities. For portfolio purposes, it is important to define these age groups visually by pose and attitude, which demonstrate the child’s capabilitie

The Textile Cycle: From Fiber to Fashion

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The text begins with the smallest part of a textile—fiber—and follows the textile cycle through to the final step, finishing. With increasing demand for more versatile and functional fabrics, finishing and care have become major areas of interest within the textile world, unlimited in their commercial potential. For example, one segment of the textile industry is devoted to fibers and finishing processes that resist stains. In their search for more stain-resistant fabrics, researchers have develo

Fiber Classification: Natural Fibers

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Critical to the comprehensive understanding of textiles is the chemical base of each fiber. All fibers can be grouped into one of the following five chemical classifications, presented in Table 2.1.

Fiber Classification: Manufactured Fibers

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Manufactured cellulose fibers are made from plant material that is processed with chemicals. This processing causes a permanent change in the structure of the fiber. For this reason, although the fibers are made from natural ingredients, they are classified as manufactured fibers. For a list of properties appropriate to all manufactured cellulose fibers, see Table 2.2, Properties Common to All Cellulose Fibers (page 16), and Table 3.1, Properties of Individual Manufactured Fibers (pages 24–25).

Fiber Classification: Synthetic Fibers

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By 1939, the process of manufacturing fibers extended to using resources such as petroleum products, petrochemicals, natural gas, and coal. The raw materials undergo complex processes necessary to spin the materials into fiber. DuPont created the first purely chemical fiber, called fiber 66. Today this fiber is called nylon.

Yarn Classification

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A yarn is a group of fibers twisted together to form a continuous strand. Yarns can be filament, spun, or novelty (see Figure 5.1).

Plain Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The difference between fiber and fabric is one of the most fundamental concepts in textiles and generally one of the most misunderstood. Fibers are the basic building materials. Fabrics are the final result of weaving, knitting, or minor fabrications. Identifying the fiber content is important, but it does not provide the complete picture for predicting performance. Think of describing a house by labeling it as wood. While the house may be built primarily of wood, that description does not create

Plain-Weave Variations: Basket and Rib Weaves

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Like plain weaves, basket-weave construction is perfectly balanced, but two or more yarns act together as one to create the structure. Basket weaves are often represented by multiples in the yarn, such as two to two, three to three, four to four, and so on. See Figure 7.1 for an example of a 2:2 basket weave.

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