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Identifying Fashion Fabrics

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Clements Ribeiro

Amber Jane Butchart

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Kostas Murkudis

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

AllSaints

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Lainey Keogh

Shonagh Marshall

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Missoni

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Flyte Ostell

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Sonia Rykiel, Fall/Winter 1986

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Held in the Tuileries Gardens on Sunday 23 March 1986 at 6 p.m., Sonia Rykiel’s fall/winter fashion show was a lengthy and glorious celebration of creativity and drama, offering a series of distinct acts of design. Figure-hugging knit silhouettes in vibrant pink as well as subdued tones of camel, black, and white were luxurious enough to transition from day to night. Panné velvet dresses with rows of provocative ruffles declared a new direction in glamour. Matching purses in the shape of oversize

Sonia Rykiel, Fall/Winter 1998

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Celebrating her thirtieth anniversary, Sonia Rykiel presented her 1998 fall/winter collection at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. The show was saturated in extravagance through looks from day to evening, and sportswear to formalwear. “No one has ever made skiwear look that glamorous,” reported the New York Times. Feminine touches in floral prints, seductive necklines, and bra tops were balanced with low-slung, wide-leg trousers with patch pockets. The collection included not only womenswear

Sonia Rykiel, Spring/Summer 1983

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Sonia Rykiel’s collection of spring/summer 1983 expressed great flamboyance and fun in a range of body-conscious silhouettes. Pastel colors, soft ties along necklines, floral prints, and white pantyhose and gloves set tones of soft femininity. “Pure Sonia Rykiel” was best shown off through “long knitted cardigans with flounced ruffle knit skirts,” along with a number of separates in signature primary colored stripes. Theatricality reigned as models danced down the runway, wore life preservers, an

Amanda Wakeley

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Anne Klein

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Laura Biagiotti

Laura Snelgrove

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Koji Tatsuno, Fall/Winter 1993

Nadya Wang

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Koji Tatsuno is a London-based Japanese designer who first arrived in the city on an antiques sourcing trip in 1982. The invitation to his fall/winter 1993 presentation was printed on paper towels, which reflected his love of, and talent for, combining found fabrics with deft ornamentation to create highly imaginative outfits—and this was shown off well in this collection, which received high praise from fashion critics.

‘Cloth for Men’: Wool and the Whisper of Darker Things In Dormeuil’s Tonik Press Campaign, 1968–75

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Ladakh

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Situated in the upper reaches of the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges, Ladakh is India’s high-altitude border region, characterized by an extraordinary desertlike landscape where barren mountains thrust toward an intensely blue sky, punctuated by green oases that reveal human habitation. Living in extreme weather conditions where temperatures drop to minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 50 degrees Celsius) in winter and rise to 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius)in summer, Ladakh’s i

Morocco

Cynthia J. Becker

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Morocco has long been a crossroads between Europe, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa, and dress reflects the richness of its history as well as its geographic and cultural diversity. Forty to sixty percent of the Moroccan population is Berber, and many Berbers have retained their indigenous language. After the Phoenicians and then the Romans settled in Morocco and encountered the Berbers, Arabs moved into Morocco in the seventh century, founding the city of Fes and gradually converting the

Sweden

Ulla Brück

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Historically there are several indications of an urge to follow fashion in Sweden, although changes were slow. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries medieval and Renaissance traits still dominated. In the eighteenth century, two-piece dresses for women and breeches and jackets for men became more common. Sweden has numerous varieties of provincial folk dress. Some consider these to be historic items, with strong local identification, while others see them as inventions of nineteenth-cent

Ireland

Síle de Cléir

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The situation regarding the various types of dress in Ireland in the period between the beginning of the nineteenth and the end of the twentieth centuries is a complex one. It is useful, perhaps, in this context to see dress in Ireland at this time as a continuum: folk dress at one end, characterized by locally produced fabrics and traditional aesthetics and deeply embedded in a local social and cultural context; and fashionable dress at the other, with a wider choice of materials and styles conn

History of Textiles of South Asia

Jasleen Dhamija

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

South Asia’s rich cultural heritage is expressed in the continuing tradition of textiles, going back nearly five thousand years. Although silk was an important textile very early, it was cotton, cultivated in most parts of South Asia and developed as a fabric, that was probably exported to other countries. Cultivated cotton, developed in the Indian subcontinent around 3000 b.c.e., was woven throughout India. South Asia was open to several contacts through trade, migrations, and conquest, enrichin

Underwear

Grace Evans

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The fashionable silhouette has gone through bewildering changes during the last two hundred years, and these would not have been possible without the shapes created beneath. Underwear and outerwear progressed in tandem. Underwear designers responded to prevailing styles of fashionable dress, and fashion designers built and relied upon the capabilities of structural underpinnings as they developed. These changes were, in turn, influenced by key social, economic, and technological developments, whi

Icelandic Knitted Apparel

Jennifer Graham

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The Kashmir Shawl: A Historical Study

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Kashmir produced export-quality textiles from at least the fourteenth century onwards, although the nature of the earliest ones is uncertain. By the late sixteenth century, fine Kashmir textiles were identified as shawl, meaning a twill-woven fabric in pashmina (cashmere) sourced from western Tibet. This material was made up not only as shoulder mantles but also as waist girdles, and in lengths to be tailored into men’s garments, as well as other forms. Only in the nineteenth century was the term

The Kashmir Shawl and Its Use in the Indo-Islamic World and Europe

Janet Rizvi

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

For the entire period of its known history, the classic Kashmir shawl, woven in twill tapestry from the finest trans-Himalayan goat pashm (cashmere), was manufactured as an export item, destined for the highest end of the market in plains India, Afghanistan, Iran, and the Ottoman Empire, and later in Europe and the United States. The industry was highly structured, and its output was tailored to the demand of particular markets. Merchants from foreign countries traveled to Srinagar, Kashmir’s cap

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