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Introduction

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Exploring contemporary fashion imagery shows that the mythical or stereotypical connotations of tweeds form a useful starting point for a deeper investigation into their history. For example, an advertisementsadvertisement in Vogue magazinesVogue for Lauren, RalphRalph Lauren’s autumn/winter 2012 womenswear collection featured outfits that were strongly influenced by British country house partiescountry clothing and 1920s fashion, including fitted jackets and jodhpurs in tweed, worn with “mannish

Tweed: Terms, Descriptions, and Characteristics

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The word tweed began to be used to denote woolen cloths from Scotland in the twill weave from the 1830s.The Satirist, September 2, 1838, front cover. Before that decade, its only form was the proper noun, Tweed, which is the name of a river that flows through the Scottish Borders region. That river became well known throughout Britain and to an extent, Europe, in the early nineteenth century because of its close associations with the famous writer, Sir Walter Scott, who lived near it.D.Watson, “T

Origins and Early Development of Tweed to 1850

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Gulvin, CliffordGulvin argues that improvements made in the Scottish woolen industry between 1770 and the late 1820s helped to lay the foundations for the later successful development of tweed production. Prior to the 1770s, the production of woolens in Scotland was considerably less advanced than that of its neighbor England in terms of its economic success and the quality of its cloths. By the late eighteenth century, England had long been renowned for producing fine broadclothsbroadcloths, whi

Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

Tweed, Femininity, and Fashion, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Prior to the early 1850s, Scottish woolen manufacturers predominantly catered to the ladies’ trade through the weaving of shawls and fine, merino dress fabrics that were known as ““cloakings”cloakings,” as noted in Chapter 3. In 1863, Locke, JamesJames Locke described recent changes in the Scottish woolen industryScottish woolen industry, by stating: The Scotch tweed trade then may be divided into three distinct sections- viz. tweeds, shawlsshawls, and cloakings. The last of these came to their c

Suits You: Men and Tweed, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Following the First World War, as Jenkins, DavidJenkins clarifies, there was an immediate boom in the wool textiles trade, which for a brief period generated high profits and labor demand.DavidJenkins, “Wool Textiles in the Twentieth Century,” in DavidJenkins, The Cambridge History of Western Textiles, II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), p. 995. In the company history of Crombie, J. & J. (company)J. & J. Crombie of Aberdeen these developments are described as follows: there was a tr

Sportswear Chic: Tweed in Womenswear, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Detailed statistics about the proportion of British tweeds, which were consumed by women, or made specifically for the female market between 1919 and 1952 are not available. However, estimates from key Scottish woolen industry bodies and a government study give a useful indication about the picture within Scotland up to 1946. The visit of the Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association (SWTA)Scottish Woollen Trade Mark Association to the USA and Canada toward the end of 1921 prompted an article in Ga

Couture to Pop and Nostalgic Fashion, 1953–1980

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Between the early 1950s and the late 1970s, the production of woolen cloths in Britain was still primarily concentrated in Yorkshire wool textiles industryYorkshire, Scotland and the West of England woolen industryWest of England.G. F.Rainnie, The Woollen and Worsted Industry: An Economic Analysis (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1965), pp. 29–31. Yorkshire continued to suitsfor menform by far the largest manufacturing region and Brearley, AlanBrearley and Iredale, John A.Iredale concluded in 1977 that

Tradition and Innovation, 1981–2014

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Hardill, IreneHardill’s study shows that woolen manufacturing in Yorkshire wool textiles industryYorkshire, which was still by far the largest center of that industry in the UK had suffered major contraction by 1981.IreneHardill, The Regional Implications of Restructuring (Aldershot: Gower Publishing Company Limited, 1987), pp. 193–4. Research for this book has identified that by 2014, the few firms trading from Yorkshire that made tweeds and other woolen cloths, included Abraham Moon & SonsAbrah

Yarn Classification

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A yarn is a group of fibers twisted together to form a continuous strand. Yarns can be filament, spun, or novelty (see Figure 5.1).

Rendering Concepts

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

For the purposes of this book, we will group the fabrics into four categories, which include: (1) wool and other textured fabrics; (2) shiny fabrics; (3) sheers; and (4) prints. To help you understand these breakdowns and categories, let's take a look at each one.

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Scotland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

By 1800, those people in Scotland who could afford it dressed in the style of clothing usually known as fashionable West European. This was no different from the dress of others of their class within Britain. There is no folk dress in Scotland, but there are some types of occupational dress that have been associated with Scotland or with particular types of work. Those who had little income for clothing dressed in what they could afford or were given by charities. As in former times, secondhand c

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