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Draping Principles and Skills

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Draping principles and skillsDraping is a technique in which DesignDesignersdesigners work with fabric, using a dress form or live model, draping and pinning the pieces together to develop the desired style. Draping is the oldest means of creating clothing. It is an art form in fabric. The techniques by which a designer works to develop a line may vary. Many designers prefer to use draping methods to create their original designs. This is because working with actual materials gives a designer gre

Torso/Blouse Sloper and Basic Shift Silhouettes

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Torso/blouse sloperThe torso/blouse sloper and basic shift silhouettes have a bust-fitting dart and no waistline seam. The waist area can be slightly fitted with one or two fisheye darts, belted, or drawn in with elastic. The side seams hang slightly away from the body and are parallel to center front. By using the torso/blouse sloper, it can be lengthened to make a shift design. Many styles of pockets, plackets, yokes, necklines, collars, and/or sleeves can be used to create the individual style

The Textile Cycle: From Fiber to Fashion

Deborah E. Young

Source: Swatch Reference Guide for Fashion Fabrics, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The text begins with the smallest part of a textile—fiber—and follows the textile cycle through to the final step, finishing. With increasing demand for more versatile and functional fabrics, finishing and care have become major areas of interest within the textile world, unlimited in their commercial potential. For example, one segment of the textile industry is devoted to fibers and finishing processes that resist stains. In their search for more stain-resistant fabrics, researchers have develo

Toile/muslin/prototype development

Jennifer Prendergast

Source: Sewing Techniques. An introduction to construction skills within the design process, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Realizing your designs through the toile development process is very satisfying. There will be mistakes along the way but this is normal and should be expected; nobody ever produces perfect results first time. There will be amendments throughout the process, for example to the details, such as pockets and trims, as well as to the toile fitting itself.

DesignTools and Supplies for Draping

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Use this list to check off each tool as you purchase it:

Fabric Characteristics and Terms

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fabric is produced from natural fibers (animal or plant) and synthetic filaments, which are spun, twisted, cured, shrunk, bulked, or manipulated in other ways to achieve yarn for weaving. Fabric structure is the result of a process of being woven, knitted, knotted, or felted to produce yarns that become cloth. Three basic weaves are the basis for all other weaves: plain weave, satin weave, and twill weave.

Basic Dress Foundation

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The dress is draped to fit the dimensions of the dress form or model, and bridges hollow areas between the bust, buttocks, and shoulder blades. Ease is added for comfortable movement without the appearance of stress. The sleeve's center grain should hang slightly forward of the front side seam, and in perfect alignment with a model's stance. The skirt hangs straight from the widest part of the hip and the hem is parallel to the floor. A number of darts control the fit of the garment by taking up

Manipulating Dart Excess and Adding Fullness

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The basic dart has creative value when draped as clusters, curved, asymmetric, or as intersecting darts, to name a few. The dart excess, when used creatively, is referred to as a dart equivalent. The following list includes by no means the only design possibilities:

Bodice Styles

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The difference between the classic Princess design and the armhole Princess is in the change of direction for one part of the shared dart leg. Other variations of the armhole Princess are shown at the end of this project in Figure 17. There are many other design possibilities based on this principle.

Skirt

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The amount of deviation from the basic straight-line skirt determines the new silhouette. Four skirt prototypes are identified by their silhouettes and are the basis for an infinite number of designs; these include the straight, or rectangle; the A-line, or triangle; the peg, or inverted triangle; and the bell silhouettes.

Collars

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar edge: The design part of a collar.

Built-Up Necklines

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A bateau neckline extends beyond and away from the neckline. Two styles of the bateau are given: one with a tuck-dart in front (Figure 1a), the other without a dart (Figure 1b).

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Dress Foundations and Designs

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The torso foundation is draped by combining the upper bodice and continuing past the waist to the hip level without an interruption of a waistline seam (see page 323Design Analysis, Figure 1). To apply the torso principle to the drape, the crossgrain is held parallel with the floor at hip level of the form. There will be excess above the waist at the side seam, which is to be taken up as a side dart. The drape establishes the principle of the basic torso foundation and is the basis for limitless

Kimono, Raglan, and Drop Shoulder

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The kimono sleeve is in-one with the bodice and draped to follow the slope of the shoulder. The overarm front and back sleeve are joined. The underseams join the front and back at varying distances below the armhole. The sleeve part of the foundation can be draped to any length and can be designed as a flared sleeve, gathered sleeve, or as a lowered shoulder (Figure 1). The kimono is draped as a bodice, but by adding length, it can be draped as a batwing dress, or be adapted to a caftan (Figure 2

Shirts and Blouses

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There are three shirt foundations— the casual dartless shirt (a), the classic shirt with yoke (b), and the oversized dartless shirt (c)—each with distinctive draping and drafting procedures. The differences are based on the amount of fullness of the shirt/blouse, the depth and enlargement of the armhole, and the modification to the basic sleeve.

Jacket/Coat Foundations and Designs

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The two illustrations mark and label the important terms associated with jackets and coats. The terms should be learned and understood for better communication in the design room.

Pants

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The baggy pant is an extension of the design possibilities of the trouser pant. It is suitable for active-wear or evening wear.

Preparing to Drape

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The preparation process for draping patterns starts by adjusting the dress form and the fabric. Key areas on the dress form will be marked with woven tape and guide pins. The fabric, either gingham or muslin, may have to be realigned in order to ensure that the lengthwise and the crosswise grains are at right angles to each other.

Tools and Supplies

Bina Abling and Kathleen Maggio

Source: Integrating Draping, Drafting, and Drawing, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The drawn form imitates both the outline contour of the real dress form and the construction (body lines) detail on the form. The difference between the flat figure and the fashion figure is that fashion figure is altered by slightly elongating its form in a nod to fashion emphasis on a slender torso.

Talk About Muslin: Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey

Clair Hughes

Source: Dressed in Fiction, 2006, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

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