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Secular Fashion In Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

national dress/costumeSabraIsrael, twentieth centuryIn national images depicting the early years of the State of Israel, the word “fashion” is deliberately associated with the unkempt pioneering sabra look: khakikhaki shorts and blue shirts characteristic of the socialist youth movements, pinafores and rubashka shirts influenced by Eastern European style, Bedouin kaffiyahkaffiyahs, biblical sandals, and dome-shaped caps known as kova tembel. To a large extent, this look became Israel’s national m

Seeing the cyborg—eye-shading, cool, and the hi-tech body (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Exploring speed in the last chapter has already enabled us to consider some aspects of the relationship between sunglasses and modern technologytechnology. But this relationship goes further. Sunglasses became a more general sign of encounters with the wonders and perils of modern technology; in the early days of TV advertising, sunglasses were worn by immaculate, 1950s housewives shading their eyes from the terrifying brilliance of whites achieved with innovative washing powders.

Seeing in the light—“sun”glasses, modern glamor, cool, and celebrity (1920s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Today, a more general sense that sunglasses protect our eyes from sunlight dominates. After all, the name finally settled on for all kinds of motor goggles, protective spectacles, autoglasses, and so on was (and is) sunglasses, conjuring up countless images of those bikini-clad women and casual, white linen-clad men basking in the glow of their own attractiveness, their sunglasses bouncing back that gold-colored light of happiness and success. Smiling or not, these men and women are embodiments o

Seeing in the dark—sunglasses and “outsider” cool (1940s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Many of the most evocative images show sunglasses worn in the dark, indoors, possibly because in these images we are forced to acknowledge their more oblique functions. Layers of darkness and blackness are compounded by dark frames with dark lenses in many of these images; think of Miles Davis in a murky club, in a dark suit, what light there is just highlighting the sheen of his skin against the intense glossy blackness of his shades.

Heading for the shade—the spread of outsider cool (1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

outsiderSunglasses were tactically used by people who were “outside” the goals and means of dominant society, as part of an articulation of a dissonant style which held an attraction just as great as that of those sunny images of “straight” success and leisure. This chapter will show how the more complex connotations of “outsider cool” became desirable and were appropriated by the “mainstream” in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond. Sunglasses could act as a sign of a “bettered self”—but they also sta

Seeing in the “eclipse”—sunglasses, cool, and the absence of meaning (late 1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Warhol, Andyglamorempty (or hollow) glamorThe light is artificial and mirrors are provided, but not windows, because the characters must be protected from bleak, bruising reality.

Sunglasses and cool—conclusions

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Before sunglasses, certain modernitychangechanges were taking place which created an environment in which they could become functionally and symbolically useful. The city, as an exemplar of modern life, was a place of new opportunities for display, self-fashioning, and casual voyeurism, as well as new levels of sensory and psychological stimulation which threatened to swamp the individual, and from which some kind of protection was required. This initially came in the form of a “blasé attitude,”

Style Narratives: Sixties in the Twenty-First Century

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

Music has been described by many of the sixties enthusiasts I interviewed to be at the core of, if not initiating, their interest in the sixties, indicating the significant role music plays in the development of style. Music affects our bodybody, moving inside from the outside. Baacke, DieterDieter Baacke describes it as a phenomenon that “storms our senses”—one that penetrates and moves the body, it drives our corporealitycorporeality and expression, it gets us to dance, to tap with our feet, or

Subversive Representation: Vernacular, Dress and Morality

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

radical notions, of jazznewspapersnegative portrayals of jazzmedianegative portrayals of jazzjazzradical notions of“Hiawatha”threatblack men asragtimerejection by black aristocracyragtimeand refined art/classmenblack/as threatfearof the Negrocommunitiesblack/and the churchclassblack aristocracychurchand black communitiesblack communities, and the churchblack aristocracyaristocracy, blackEarly jazz, including ragtime and blues, found fruition at a time of social, political and economic change in A

Beyond The Gardenia: Billie Holiday

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

Holiday, Billieinfluence of Hollywoodstyleof Billie HolidayHoliday, Billiedress/style ofOn April 7, 1915, Eleanora Fagan, who would later become known as Billie Holiday, was born in Philadelphia to Sadie, a single mother. This simple event did not foreshadow the star that would suddenly shine bright and burn out within a few decades. In Baltimore, Fagan’s Holiday, Billieearly yearsearly years included a laboring mother, an absent father, truancy, rape by a neighbor and time at an institution for

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

Glacé Wonderland: Cuteness, Sexuality and Young Women

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

kawaii (cute) aestheticswomen andporn-chicKawase, Tomoko (Tommy)‘Bloomin’!’kawaii (cute) aestheticsinfantile kindKawaii is like love of humanity, you need a certain mental capacity, strength and experiences to appreciate the fragile.Hitomi, quoted and explained by Kenji of Milkboy during a Skype interview, 29 November 2013. I thank Kenji for sharing this important story.

Ribbons and Lace: Girls, Decorative Femininity and Androgyny

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘There’s one thing about you,’ Maudie said. ‘You always look ladylike.’JeanRhys, Voyage in the Dark (London: Penguin Books, 2000 [1934]), p. 10. ‘Oh God,’ I said, ‘who wants to look ladylike?’

An Ivy Boy and A Preppy Girl: Style Import-Export

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

Taking great care of appearance is the first step of every fashion.

Concluding Japanese Fashion Cultures, Change and Continuity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

For both men and women, whenever sex is an issue, so also is looking and being seen. Every woman who has ever been accosted on the street knows the temporary desire to be invisible, just as every person of either sex has posed in public, hoping to be regarded as attractive by his or her peers.ValerieSteele, Fashion and Eroticism: Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Jazz Age (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), p. 247.

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Desi-Chic: The Image and Ideals of Fashion in Indian Magazines

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style 2015

Book chapter

The evolution of a distinctive visual identity within the local fashion design industry that responds to Indian tastes, traditions and crafts, along with the presence of international fashion brands in India have not only led to a shift in the sartorial landscape, they have also had an impact on the image and representation of fashion. This was evident in the discussion over the previous chapter with regard to film, television and emerging spheres of fashion blogging, and is also mirrored in prin

A Soundtrack for Consumerism: Music, Image and Myth

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Fashion, Costume and Narrative Tropes in TV Drama

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The use of fashion in Sex and the City and Ugly Betty is bound up with notions of performativity and ‘excess’. Ugly Betty relies upon an ‘excessive’, ‘camp’ aesthetic which foregrounds its own construction and in so doing adopts an ambiguous attitude towards the notion of the ‘authentic’ self—at times entirely rejecting it in favour of an ‘image-based’ identity. This image-based identity is presented as potentially subversive and resistive, challenging the assumption that the so-called postmodern

Fun With Pins and Rope: How Caroline Baker Styled the 1970s

Alice Beard

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present 2013

Book chapter

A double-page photographic spread from Nova magazine picturing a host of fashion editors arriving at the 1969 autumn/winter Paris collections suggests an interest in fashion’s ‘backstage’ that perhaps pre-empts today’s mood of fascination, where stylists are held up as celebrities and fashion editors are the subjects of feature films (see Figure 2.1). The recognisable names are there—among them, Diana Vreeland (American Vogue), Ernestine Carter (Sunday Times) and a young Grace Coddington (British

The Meaning of Style between Classic and Queer

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

It’s part of my bad side.

Lesbian Style: From Mannish Women to Lipstick Dykes

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

Of course, there’s a strict gay dress code no matter where you cruise. At the height of my college cruising, I was attending Take Back the Night meetings dressed in Mr Greenjeans overall, Birkenstocks, and a bowl haircut that made me look like I’d just been released from a bad foster home. There is nothing more pitiful to look at than a closeted femme.

Gay Men’s Style: From Macaroni to Metrosexual

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

The term for the particular form of male style from the late eighteenth century, macaroni (or maccaroni), did in fact come from eating pasta (the Greek makaria literally means ‘food made from barley’), which had become fashionable in the 1760s through men who had returned to England after exploring the European continent, especially Italy, on the Grand Tour. Macaronis typically took pains to announce their difference in outlandish examples of foreign clothing that was either foreign—French and It

Kiss of the Whip: Bondage, Discipline and Sadomasochism, or BDSM Style

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style 2013

Book chapter

You modern men, you children of reason, cannot begin to appreciate love as pure bliss and divine serenity; indeed this kind of love is disastrous for men like you, for as soon as you try to be natural you become vulgar. To you Nature is an enemy. You have made devils of the smiling gods of Greece and have turned me into a creature of evil.

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