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Introduction to Size Specification and Technical Design

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

National and designer brand merchandise is owned by manufacturing companies called wholesalers. The brands are produced in factories owned or contracted by the wholesaler, then purchased by various retail establishments. Brands are widely recognized by consumers, in part due to national advertising. Free People, Stussy, and 7 for All Mankind are a few of the popular brands reported by blogger Olivia Newton of the hip British Youth market.Which are the brands that Millennials love, hate or worse h

The Sourcing Process

Jeremy A. Rosenau and David L. Wilson

Source: Apparel Merchandising. The Line Starts Here, 3rd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Because difficulties in sourcing arise when no structure is in place, specific procedures should be developed and followed by a company that chooses to source domestically. A “fire-fighting” philosophy of resolving problems as they occur is a guarantee that the sourcing executives will be constantly fighting fires rather than preventing them. Too many issues in sourcing have the potential for error. The following are processes and procedures that have been used effectively by companies that have

Chapter twenty-one: Outsourcing Fashion Design, Production, and Management

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

One of the greatest victories you can gain over someone is to beat him with politeness.

The Supply Chain

Virginia Grose

Source: Fashion Merchandising, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

It is useful to understand industrialization, within the context of the textiles industry, in order to examine supply chain management in more detail.

Production

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Intern, 2nd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A flowchart of the production or manufacturing process as it relates to the various sectors of the fashion industry is shown as Figure 11.2. Next is an examination of the actual manufacturing steps, from development of the production pattern to distribution of the finished product. At the end of this chapter, costing activities for the various steps are presented.

The Apparel Industry

Jan Hilger

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Before the mid-nineteenth century garments were produced manually. With the invention of sewing machines, mass manufacturing became possible. In just over 160 years, business complexity increased from one-man companies, dominated by artisan tailors, to multinational corporations. In Europe and in the United States the first apparel factories following the Fordist model were established. A new unskilled workforce replaced skilled craftsmen. With growing distance from the consumer and decreasing in

Home Production

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothes are connected to necessity as well as to luxury. The production of them can be viewed the same way. Many clothes have historically been produced at home but in different contexts. Sewing and needlework have been paid work, hobbies, and a part of domestic work during the last couple of centuries. In the early twentieth century, many (if not most) clothes and garments were made at home. This situation has changed, although textiles and clothing are still important parts of housekeeping in t

European Retailers and Global Sourcing Networks

Lotte Thomsen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The sourcing networks of global buyers have spread over a large range of countries and regions, and clothing consumption in West Europe in the early twenty-first century is almost entirely fed by imports from developing countries. There are considerable differences in the sourcing policies and practices of major West European retailers. But in the early twenty-first century, clothing sourcing networks—especially those based in Anglo-Saxon countries—are reaching a level of maturity that imposes ne

H&M Post-Rana Plaza

David S. Waller , Helen J. Waller

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Introductory

Business case

In 2017, the Swedish-based global clothes retailer H&M was chosen as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies, for the seventh consecutive time, by the Ethisphere Institute. H&M is an example of a “fast fashion” retailer, which produces clothing that is designed quickly and produced cheaply to take advantage of the latest trend, which is then discarded for the next trend. Fast fashion has

Dries Van Noten

Annette Condello

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Introductory

Business case

The themes of sustainability and luxury intertwine in the business of fashion. This case study evaluates the relationship between the two by exploring the strong link that exists for the fashion label Dries van Noten. Inspired by novel craft technologies and ancient traditions, unassuming Belgian fashion designer Dries Van Noten integrates sustainability with luxury in his approach to business. In the Dries Van Noten Antwerp store the customer experience is enhanced by the company’s unique appare

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