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Understanding Product Trends: What Customers Buy

Richard Clodfelter

Source: Retail Buying. From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

product line,As a buyer, you must plan and control the kinds of products that will be offered in your store or department. In other words, you must be concerned with the merchandise mix,merchandise mix—the types or mix of products that are available for customers to purchase. The merchandise mix that you select should meet the specific needs of your customers. It must be frequently monitored because an appropriate mix today might not contain the right products tomorrow.

Product Development

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Product development,merchandiser role in,Product development,designer role in,Knock-offs,Anchors,American Apparel and Footwear Association,Product lines of apparel are created and styled for wholesale presentation several times, or seasons, per year. In the fashion industries, a product line is simply called a line. A line encompasses not only the individual item of apparel or accessories but the entire season's production from that manufacturer as well. The term line is used for moderate- and po

Sizing and Fit Specifications

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“In analyzing how my competitors communicate fit, I saw a place, an opportunity where we could first use models that have more average size figures and also develop a size chart that is easily understandable . . . I want to gain trust and loyalty with our customer base.”

iBRAND: The Age of Interactive, Wireless, and Virtual Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Interactive branding refers to a situation whereby the consumer interacts directly with the brand or the process of creating and developing it. It is through the help of new technologies that it has become possible for consumers to play a direct and interactive role in shaping a brand as he or she likes. A good example of this trend is the concept of mass customization (or MC). In this chapter we focus on mass customization, explain the concept, give examples of various applications, and then exa

IT in the Clothing Industry

Céline Abecassis-Moedas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Information technology (IT) in the clothing industry is one of the elements that allows the latest fashion trends from the catwalks to be transformed into mass-market products within days. In clothing manufacturing, it is important to distinguish between preassembly of garments (design, marker-making, or putting the patterns on the fabric, spreading the fabric, cutting, and bundling operations) and garment assembly. Most of the innovations in production and information technologies are taking pla

Size and Fit in Industrially Produced Clothes

Karen Borregaard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The defining characteristic of ready-to-wear clothes, which differentiates them from made-to-measure clothes, is that they are produced in standard sizes to fit individuals whose exact body dimensions are not known by producers. The aim of standard sizes is to fit as many in a target group as possible. Size refers to both a garment’s measurements and the way size is communicated to customers. In addition, each ready-to-wear style is produced in a range of sizes, known as a sizing system. The numb

The Apparel Industry

Jan Hilger

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Before the mid-nineteenth century garments were produced manually. With the invention of sewing machines, mass manufacturing became possible. In just over 160 years, business complexity increased from one-man companies, dominated by artisan tailors, to multinational corporations. In Europe and in the United States the first apparel factories following the Fordist model were established. A new unskilled workforce replaced skilled craftsmen. With growing distance from the consumer and decreasing in

The Structure and Form of European Clothes

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing is both a material covering and an enclosure for the body that in West Europe is generally constructed through draping or cutting cloth or through weaving or knitting it to shape. The structure of European dress is also bound up with abstract ideals of conduct and beauty. The aesthetic and phenomenological dimension of clothing moving in space is also significant. Some fashions such as women’s court dress from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were designed to be “read” from a fro

England

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In 1800, the people of England dressed in the general West European clothing style that was worn by all fashionable people. Wealth determined what a person could afford to wear but not the style. There was no folk dress, so the general impression was that wealthy people wore the same styles as their workers, with only the quality showing the difference. The poor acquired garments from secondhand clothes dealers or as gifts from wealthier family members or friends, charities, and employers, as wel

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