Results: Text (17) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 17 of 17 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Location Factors

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

On-Site and Off-Site Locations

Jay Diamond, Ellen Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Fashion Retailing. A multi-channel approach, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Selecting the most suitable location involves a three-pronged approach. First is the choice of a trading area that best serves the needs of the particular company, second is the exploration of the available shopping districts within the desired trading area, and third is the choice of the exact site on which the store will stand. The following sections explore each prong and show its importance to success.

Space Planning Principles

Sarah Bailey and Jonathan Baker

Source: Visual Merchandising for Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The most important factor for any retailer is to define its product and inform its customers of the product ranges and available choices. While visual merchandising is used to attract customers, it is also necessary to define a brand’s image and encourage brand loyalty by creating a pleasurable and memorable shopping experience. Key indicators include:

Store Layout And Merchandise Presentation

John Donnellan

Source: Merchandise Buying and Management, 4th Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A store’s physical appearance is an image component that conveys a message about offerings, pricing strategy, and market positioning. A prototype is a model store that combines elements of décor, lighting, fixturing, and signage to create a shopping ambiance consistent with the store’s image and target customers. A prototype is a synthesis of standards for operational efficiency, merchandise presentation, and customer service. Though specialty stores are best known for their distinctive prototype

Retail Leasing for Fashion

Matthew E. Epstein and Lee Sporn

Source: Fashion Law. A Guide for Designers, Fashion Executives, and Attorneys, 2nd Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter outlines the process of entering into a retail lease and reviews those key lease provisions that are critical to a successful retail operation. Special attention will be given to the provisions that can allow a company to exit from a location that has failed to thrive.

Chapter twenty-three: The Fashion Retailer

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Good taste shouldn’t have to cost anything extra.

The Plan

Judith C. Everett and Kristen K. Swanson

Source: Guide to Producing A Fashion Show, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Professional designer runway shows, which are produced for such events as fashion week in New York, London, or Milan, or the prêtà-porter and haute couture shows in Paris, typically rely on the designer’s public relations officer to assist the designer in hiring a show producer. Retailers, fashion schools, and charitable organizations more typically use the skills of a staff member, faculty member, or community volunteer to serve as fashion show director to produce the show. Both types of shows r

Developing a Road Map for Success

Michele M. Granger and Tina M. Sterling

Source: Fashion Entrepreneurship. Retail Business Planning, 2nd Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

To an entrepreneur in today’s fast-changing environment, the business plan is critical. A business plan is a written document outlining a direction for where the business is going and how it is going to get there. If approached objectively, the business plan addresses whether the concept is feasible, whether there is enough money to start and sustain the business through the start-up phase, what makes the best use of time and money, and whether there is a market large enough for the business to b

Analyzing the Industry and Finding Customers

Michele M. Granger and Tina M. Sterling

Source: Fashion Entrepreneurship. Retail Business Planning, 2nd Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The marketing plan describes the industry and the entrepreneur’s specific actions intended to bring his or her products or services to market and persuade consumers to buy. Without a solid marketing plan, the business is going nowhere. Profitability rests, in large part, on not only identifying a target market, but also ensuring that there is a big enough market to make the business profitable. Researching the market and understanding that market can give the entrepreneur a better idea of the nee

Finding the Right Location for the Business

Michele M. Granger and Tina M. Sterling

Source: Fashion Entrepreneurship. Retail Business Planning, 2nd Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The entrepreneur’s ultimate objective in deciding where a business should be located is to position the business at a site that will maximize the likelihood of success. Choosing a location is a matter of selecting the place that best serves the needs of the business’s target market. Sometimes, the general location for the business may be limited to the area where the entrepreneur lives. If there are no such limitations, the location selection may begin with a broad regional search that is systema

Retail Strategy

Virginia Grose

Source: Fashion Merchandising, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Johnson and Scholes define strategy as ‘the direction and scope of an organization over the long-term: which achieves advantage for the organization through its configuration of resources within a challenging environment, to meet the needs of markets and to fulfil stakeholder expectations.’

The Company Mission, Image, and Location

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Intern, 2nd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The internship company is directed by its vision, one that is often articulated through its mission statement. The company’s goals and objectives produce an image, a company personality, and a culture. The places it chooses to locate its products and workforce contribute to this image. All are examined in this chapter.

Brick-and-Mortar Retailing

Jay Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Retailing in the Twenty-First Century, 2nd Edition, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Best known among the traditional retailers are department stores and specialty chain organizations. These are among the largest retail classifications both here and abroad. Each type serves a specific merchandising need, with the former offering a wide array of products and the latter a more narrow range of merchandise. Every classification of consumer products, ranging from apparel to foods, is available through one of these two types of retailers.

Location Analysis and Selection

Jay Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Retailing in the Twenty-First Century, 2nd Edition, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The United States—and, for that matter, the entire world—comprises general trading areas in which retailers may choose to establish business outlets. A trading area might be an entire country, a region of a country, a city, or a community within a city. Many major retailers such as Wal-Mart are expanding their businesses into overseas arenas and therefore must consider the entire globe as their potential trading area. On the other hand, smaller merchants generally narrow their markets to more res

Finding the Right Location

Rosalie J. Regni and Jimmie G. Anderson

Source: Entrepreneurship in Action. A Retail Store Simulation, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Location, Location, Location … Where have I heard that before?”

Site Selection

Lynda Rose Poloian

Source: Retailing Principles. Global, Multichannel, and Managerial Viewpoints, 2nd Edition, 2003, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After completing this chapter you should be able to:

Only Bright Lights for Uniqlo?

Myles Ethan Lascity

Source: Bloomsbury Fashion Business Cases

Level: Introductory

Business case

Japanese specialty-store retailer of private-label apparel, Uniqlo, has outlets around the globe, but their expansion in the U.S. market has seemingly stalled. Since 2005 the retailer has had a presence in the United States, first with several mall locations before it switched to using flagship stores as a market entry strategy. As such, flagships now dot fashion-forward areas, including in New York’s SoHo district, San Francisco’s Union Square, and Chicago’s Michigan Avenue; the chain also opene

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 17 of 17 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1