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Introduction to Fashion Styling

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

StylingFashion stylingTrends, how to spot current and emergingIn this chapter you will learn:

Careers in Styling

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion stylistdiversifyingIn this chapter you will learn:

Trend Details for Business

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

VetementsMacy’sClose-to-selling-seasonCamouflageanalysisBurberry In this chapter we will explore what information should be gathered from catwalks, street styling and trade shows. These three areas form the basis for a wellrounded trend analysis, which can serve as a starting point for a longer-term trend forecast. Catwalks are usually considered near-season analysis, which is used by companies that want to understand the current state of the menswear business.

How to Research Trends

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In trend forecasting we are not initially researching one particular area of interest, but gathering information on as many areas as possible. Even in fashion, one needs to be aware of what is happening in areas as diverse as politics and the economy. These areas are intertwined and ultimately influence fashion. Politics directly influences society and economics, which will ultimately influence spending. At times of economic uncertainty, spending goes down and also becomes more concentrated on es

Fashion and film

Clare Harris

Source: The Fundamentals of Digital Fashion Marketing, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Fashion and film have had a long and productive relationship. Costume is extremely important in film; costume designers work as storytellers, their designs helping to bring characters to life.

Developing a collection

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As a fashion designer, you can work at various “levels” within the fashion industry. The choice of direction you make will depend on your training, ability, and interests—as well as, of course, how much you would like to be paid for your work. Finding your niche in fashion design may be something that you’ve been working toward from the beginning—or it may evolve more organically as you continue on your career path.

The Fashion Show: from Couturier to Catwalk

Jon Cope and Dennis Maloney

Source: Fashion Promotion in Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter examines types of fashion shows and their essential components. We discuss the evolution of the show, and how online technologies and social media have accelerated promotion before, during, and after the event. Finally, we look to the future and ask whether a wider audience reach means the end of the front row.

What is a collection?

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any successful or financially viable collection requires an enormous amount of research, investigation, and planning. Successful designers, manufacturers, and retailers have a clear understanding of their customers’ needs, as well as an understanding of their position in a highly competitive market. In addition to the creation and realization of any collection, designers need to consider a range of issues if the final garments are to hang in customers’ closets.

Fashion Shows and Special Events

Kristen K. Swanson and Judith C. Everett

Source: Promotion In The Merchandising Environment, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“This collection is dedicated to the women who inspire me and to the showgirl in all of us.”

Fashion Forecasting

Kristen K. Swanson and Judith C. Everett

Source: Promotion In The Merchandising Environment, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“One of the things we’ve noticed at our shows is that we have all walks of life as far as attendees. We have everything from the emerging fashion designer to the large department store buyers.”

Dsquared2

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” Trousers

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” trousers caused a sensation as one of the most provocative designs of the 1990s. McQueen redefined the silhouette with the Bumsters by cutting the waistband two inches below that of hipster trousers to elongate the torso and expose the lower spine and top of the buttocks. Although a prototype pair was made in late 1992, Bumsters first appeared on the catwalk in McQueen’s inaugural show, “Nihilism” (spring/summer 1994). Reappearing in collections including the controv

Makeup on the Catwalk from the 1970s to 2000

Geraldine Biddle-Perry

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This article is an exploratory history within a history of the catwalk since the 1970s. It examines the centrality of makeup to shifting systems and structures of catwalk performance and spectacle, but it is not a trend-by-trend analysis of cosmetic practices and products. Rather, the aim is to examine catwalk makeup as a generative force within the wider transformation of fashion image as commodity and cultural form in the latter decades of the twentieth century.

Fashion Journalism and the Catwalk

Julie Bradford

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The second half of the twentieth century may go down as a golden age for the fashion press covering the collections. As ready-to-wear shows multiplied and fashion became part of popular culture—but before live-streaming and social media meant that everyone could see collections instantly—journalists were in a uniquely privileged position to convey news of this exciting new world to a burgeoning audience. This article will investigate how integral the press was to the development of fashion shows

Striptease

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Striptease is a public performance of the otherwise private act of undressing. It is characterized by its emphasis on clothes, rather than the body beneath. As a demonstration of transformation, striptease highlights the capacity for clothes to conceal and reveal what lies beneath, be it a naked body or another layer of cloth. Catwalk shows make regular use of elements of striptease, layering garments so that ensembles can be revealed piece by piece. More overt references to erotic striptease are

Christian Dior Haute Couture by John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1997–1998

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Following his enthusiastically celebrated debut at Dior, for his second couture collection, John Galliano staged another highly theatricalized défilé in the notoriously gallant environment of the Jardin de Bagatelle. It was the first set design in a series commissioned from Michael Howells, who created complementing backdrops for Galliano’s garments and scenography. Aesthetical measures established in the first show for spring—traditional visual codes and the sartorial heritage of Christian Dior,

Michiko Koshino

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Red or Dead, Spring/Summer 1996

Jenny Evans

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Red or Dead’s “New York Dolls” collection caused outrage in the British tabloid press. The Mail on Sunday described the show as the “sick face of British fashion” after models brandished bloodied knives, knitting needles, and scissors. The clothing was almost overshadowed by the show’s melodramatic kitsch depiction of a dystopian future inhabited by “disturbed housewives.” While the emergence of “Cool Britannia” was attracting positive global attention, Wayne and Geraldine Hemingway, Red or Dead’

Kansai Yamamoto

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Analyzing the Presentation of a Fashion Collection

Tony Glenville

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Promotion for the Designer and Manufacturer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

What is the difference between consumer and trade publications? A consumer publication is readily available to the layperson, the general customer. The consumer may subscribe to the periodical, online or in print, or purchase it at a store. Nearly all consumer lifestyle publications feature some type of fashion content (e.g., People, Town & Country, and Travel ); some are devoted exclusively to fashion and interior design. Examples of fashion consumer publications include Vogue, In Style, House &

Fashion Styling, Photography, and Costume Design

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A retailer, manufacturer, designer, or organization may contract an independent firm, the fashion show and event planning company, to do all or part of this work for a fee. In general, the fashion show and event producer manages fashion shows and special events for its clients. The company works with each client to determine the type of event, intended purpose, designated audience, and the budget. The company may be contracted to handle part or all of the advertising and public relations, which c

Couture Shows of the 2000s

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Haute couture’s economic feasibility remained questionable throughout the 2000s, though ateliers were supported by increased patronage from Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern and Russian clients. Hundreds of petites mains shut down their businesses, while a minority were purchased by houses. Several labels conceded their haute couture memberships; however, the Chambre Syndicale also inducted a handful of new houses and welcomed Armani Privé as a “corresponding member.” Prospective couturiers could m

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Spring/Summer 1994

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This collection was shown in Paris beneath the Louvre in the newly renovated Carrousel underground complex, the first time a fashion show had been organized underground. The collection attracted controversy because of three dresses printed with Arabic writing. When clerics in Indonesia protested, Lagerfeld apologized, destroyed the dresses, and asked journalists and photographers not to publish photos of them. The mannequins in this show were not just top models, but celebrities and actresses. Th

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