Results: Text (29) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 29 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
Fabrication

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Every time that I wanted to give up, if I saw an interesting textile, print, whatever, suddenly I would see a collection.”

Fibers: Exploring Healthy and Clean Fiber

Gail Baugh

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

GAIL BAUGH has extensive senior management experience in the apparel and textile industries, particularly in global product sourcing for large retail chain stores and for Teijin Frontier (USA). Experienced in retail buying, production management, and textile development, Gail has a Chemistry of Textiles undergraduate degree and a Master’s degree studying consumers’ attitudes toward discarded apparel. “It is my mission,” she says, “to focus the apparel industry on fiber innovations to address the

The Direction Of Fashion Change

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

I try to translate what I sense from the street.

Challenges and Propositions: Alternative Approaches to Design and Engagement

Hélène Day Fraser

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

HÉLÈNE DAY FRASER is an Associate Professor at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, Canada. She isa founding member of theECUMaterial Matters research cluster, a member of the Emily Carr DESIS Lab, the International Local Wisdom research network, and Creatives with Intent (an Emily Carr based sustainability initiative).She is the Lead Investigator on the cloTHING(s) as conversation research project and co-investigator and a Research Fellow with the Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator. Hél

Economic Impact of Textile and Clothing Recycling

Jana Hawley

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

JANA HAWLEY, PHD, is professor and director of the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona. She has conducted research for more than fifteen years on recycled clothing from a systems perspective that ranges from consumers’ discard habits, to policy makers and international trade law, to charitable organizations, and finally to for-profit organizations that search for value-added opportunities for recycled clothing. Hawley believes that recycling clothing is just

Best Practices: Peg and Awl: To Make Things out of Other Things: Interview by Janet Hethorn, September 30, 2014

Janet Hethorn and Connie Ulasewicz (eds)

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“Peg and Awl” is the title of a song by the Carolina Tar Heels. Margaux reflects, “It’s a song that I liked about shoemaking and also takes us back to a time when things were made well.” The Peg and Awl logo contains a Hagal rune symbol, meaning (in part), “what happens after the destruction.” This also symbolizes continuous change and creative building. Both their name and visual messaging, via marketing and social media, reflect their values of quality and renewal. It was clear from the start o

Best Practices The Filippa K Story

Kerli Kant Hvass

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

According to their sustainability manager, one of the biggest impacts the business has is in the consumer phase, and therefore they are trying to implement practices to help consumers make more conscious choices when it comes to consumption, use, and reuse. In pursuing this, and to encourage a longer life for their products, they opened their first Filippa K Second Hand store in Stockholm in 2008. This was done in collaboration with a local entrepreneur who had successfully run another female con

Textiles and The Environment

Ingrid Johnson, Allen C. Cohen and Ajoy K. Sarkar

Source: J.J. Pizzuto’s Fabric Science, 11th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The twentieth century was an awesome period in human history due to the significant amount of technology developed during the time period. Cars, jets, computers, manufactured fibers, the artificial heart, television, and cell phones have benefited mankind. It was the golden age of science and technology.

The Fashion of Sustainability

Linda Welters

Source: Sustainable Fashion What’s Next?. A Conversation about Issues, Practices and Possibilities, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

LINDA WELTERS, PHD, is professor in the Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design Department at the University of Rhode Island. She has published on European folk dress, archaeological textiles, American quilts, and American fashion. Her most recent publication is The Fashion Reader, 2nd edition (Berg, 2011), which she coedited with Abby Lillethun. With Patricia Cunningham, she coedited Twentieth-Century American Fashion (Berg, 2005).

End-of-life

Alison Gwilt

Source: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

‘The recycling of textiles into upcycled garments is what makes us sustainable. We create style that outlasts seasons while still managing to retain the original ethos of individuality off the peg.’

Chapter nine: Sustainable Fashion: An Eco-Friendly Movement

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Eco fashion, green fashion, sustainable fashion—whatever you call it— is more about reconnecting with the clothing. We’ve lost touch with the environmental and social justice implications of fashion.

Why Do We Display?

Martin M. Pegler

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

After You Have Read This Chapter, You Will Be Able To Discuss

Textiles And The Ecosystem

Virginia Hencken Elsasser

Source: Textiles. Concepts and Principles, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Consumers, retailers, and manufacturers are concerned about the impact of textile product production on the ecosystem. All phases of fabric production—fiber, yarn, fabric, finish, and coloration—can impact on the environment. The textile industry has begun to reduce its impact through development of renewable and low-impact fibers, reduction of waste from processing plants, and use of less harmful chemicals for finishing and dyeing.

Germany

Irene Guenther

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

German dress in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was closely linked to French–German relations. Critics disapproved of affluent German women’s fondness for French styles. During the Napoleonic wars, German rural folk dress often featured prominently at national festivals, manifesting patriotism. Ironically, it was with the French occupation during this time that German fragmentation consolidated, bringing a sense of “Germanness.” Industrialization occurred rapidly in the German states. Afte

Secondhand Clothing

Karen Tranberg Hansen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Secondhand clothing constitutes a global market of commerce and consumption that has a long but changing history with complex links to garment production, tailoring, and couture. In Europe and North America, secondhand clothing was an important source of clothing well into the nineteenth century, until mass production and growing prosperity enabled more and more people to purchase brand-new rather than previously worn garments. During Europe’s imperial expansion, the trade in secondhand clothing

Ecological Issues in Dress

Jana M. Hawley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Ecological concerns relating to dress arise at various points in the processes used to manufacture textiles and apparel and also as a result of the use of those products. These concerns are similar in both the United States and Canada, and the solutions to these problems are much the same in both countries.

Secondhand Clothing

Heike Jenss

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The term secondhand clothing connotes garments that enter a second or new circle of use after they have been worn or used by a previous owner. The handing down, sale, and reuse of previously worn garments have been common practices throughout the history of dress. Even into the twentieth century, garments were expensive goods and often a family investment that was passed on to the next generation or traded and exchanged for other goods. With the wider accessibility of fashion and the acceleration

Vintage Dress

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The term vintage generally refers to the revived use of certain secondhand clothes, shoes, and accessories primarily originating from the twentieth century. From being a subcultural phenomenon in the mid-1990s, vintage became a mainstream trend in Euro-American markets around the beginning of the twenty-first century. Vintage can be seen as a paradoxical fashion phenomenon in the sense that it assumes durable qualities similar to those of vintage cars and wine, while fashion is often defined by t

Switzerland

Sigrid Pallmert

Translated by Kirsten Warner

Philipp Thüring

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

As a multicultural country, dress in Switzerland has been characterized by a cosmopolitan outlook and adoption of international influences. Bourgeois styles have been dominant, but at various times communities of radical thinkers and avant-garde artists have made their mark on Swiss dress styles. For the rural population, regional and ethnic dress has been very important, to the extent that Swiss folklore has had a considerable influence on the perception of Switzerland. This is true even in the

Norway

Tone Rasch

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Is it possible to understand the way people dress by looking at their history and natural environment? A survey of Norwegians’ habits and attitudes related to clothing suggests that the answer is yes. The country is located on the periphery of the European continent. There are few inhabitants, and the combination of a long coastline and numerous mountain ranges has led to scattered settlements and great distances between them. Politically, Norway became independent in 1905 after being a part of t

Ethics and Industry

Lise Skov

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The question of ethics is about determining concepts of right and wrong human action. There are a number of ethical controversies in relation to the industries that dress the visible self, especially the clothing, shoes, accessories, and skin-care industries. The five main areas of controversy are, first, representations of idealized gender and body images; second, fakes and counterfeits of branded goods; third, working conditions; fourth, environmental impact and sustainability; and fifth, anima

England

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In 1800, the people of England dressed in the general West European clothing style that was worn by all fashionable people. Wealth determined what a person could afford to wear but not the style. There was no folk dress, so the general impression was that wealthy people wore the same styles as their workers, with only the quality showing the difference. The poor acquired garments from secondhand clothes dealers or as gifts from wealthier family members or friends, charities, and employers, as wel

Going Green

Jay Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Retailing in the Twenty-First Century, 2nd Edition, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Discussions of the green movement, advertisements that speak to it, and programs that address the concept all involve the use of terminology that is often not fully understood by consumers and business people. In order to develop a better understanding about what retailers and writers on the topic are speaking of, it is essential to have a working knowledge of the “green” language. The following terms are frequently employed:

Other People's Clothes? The International Secondhand Clothing Trade and Dress Practices in Zambia

Karen Tranberg Hansen

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In much of the West today, second-hand clothing makes up fringe, or niche, markets. Income distribution, purchasing power, affordable mass-produced garments and apparel, and concerns with fashion have reduced the need for large segments of the population to purchase used clothing. But well into the nineteenth century, used clothing constituted the effective market for much of the population except the very rich. Still in many countries in the Third World today, where the cost factor is enormously

Ethics in Manufacturing and Sourcing Fashion Products

V. Ann Paulins and Julie L. Hillery

Source: Ethics in the Fashion Industry, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The concept of consumer sovereignty refers to the power that consumers have in the marketplace to exercise choice and ultimately drive the production of goods. Economic theory (and common sense) holds that consumers will demand and purchase only those products that they find to be acceptable. Therefore manufacturers and retailers of substandard goods will fail in the marketplace because consumers will stop buying and using unsatisfactory products. According to the theory, this process of consumer

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 29 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2