Results: Text (30) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 30 (2 pages)
    Page 1 of 2
The Fashion Buyer

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A fashion buyer is the individual or group of individuals (the buying team) whose primary role is to purchase merchandise for a retail organization. They work diligently in researching trends; sourcing materials and/or product; creating seasonal buying plans; and working with outside vendors and designers to produce a range that will be distributed through various retail channels such as brick-and-mortar locations, online stores, and/or catalogs.

The Fashion Show: from Couturier to Catwalk

Jon Cope and Dennis Maloney

Source: Fashion Promotion in Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter examines types of fashion shows and their essential components. We discuss the evolution of the show, and how online technologies and social media have accelerated promotion before, during, and after the event. Finally, we look to the future and ask whether a wider audience reach means the end of the front row.

Cargo Pants

Joseph H. Hancock

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

During the twentieth century, cargo pants have gone from being a traditional military uniform to a popular casual pant worn by many consumers in the global consumer market. Since the late 1960s, when hippies wore army surplus vintage styles as a sign of protest against the Vietnam War, cargo pants have undergone a considerable transformation, changing in both fabrication and form. They have penetrated popular culture through intermediaries such as the military, subcultural style, film, media, ret

Max Mara

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Brands And Private Labels

John Donnellan

Source: Merchandise Buying and Management, 4th Edition, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Branded merchandise, or brand-name merchandise, is identified by a name and/or symbol associated with certain product characteristics. Lucky Brand, Wrangler, Louis Vuitton, Levi’s, Ralph Lauren, and Escada are brands. Certain product characteristics are associated with each brand: Lucky Brand (high price), Wrangler (moderate price), Levi’s (fit), Louis Vuitton (durability), Ralph Lauren (styling), and Escada (prestige). Most brand names imply multiple product characteristics. Louis Vuitton is kno

New Markets and Expansion: 1880s–1900

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: A History of the Paper Pattern Industry. The Home Dressmaking Fashion Revolution, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

By 1880, the six major U.S. pattern companies—Demorest, Butterick, McCall, Harper’s Bazar, Taylor, and Domestic—had positioned themselves in the market. Each published a magazine advertising their patterns for the latest fashions for women, a full complement of children’s clothing, undergarments for all, and shirts, trousers, and various other men’s non-tailored garments.

Visualizing the Customer

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“My idea is ‘woman’ in general, and a collection must fit all types.”

Mass-Market Fashion Brands

Kaled K. Hameide

Source: Fashion Branding. Unraveled, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

MASS-MARKET brands are ones that are mass produced. They range in price from low-priced budget brands to high-priced premium brands with mid-priced consumer brands in between. Mass-market fashion brands are generally fashion followers and not trendsetters. They may suffer from sameness, indistinguishable differences, or lack of creativity compared to luxury brands; thus, they are rarely positioned on creativity but on values derived from price, and convenience. Accordingly, these brands’ values u

The Jeans that Don’t Fit: Marketing Cheap Jeans in Brazil

Rosana Pinheiro-Machado

Source: Global Denim, 2011, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the Denim Manifesto anthropologists are challenged to study denim – something that is commonplace in our everyday lives but notably absent from ethnographic analyses. As a manifesto, the authors refute the ontological philosophical logic that an element, such as clothing, that is located on the surface of bodies is intrinsically a superficial problem. Instead they consider the philosophical implications of the use of jeans – a clothing resource that resolves the anxiety and the contradictions

IT in the Clothing Industry

Céline Abecassis-Moedas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Information technology (IT) in the clothing industry is one of the elements that allows the latest fashion trends from the catwalks to be transformed into mass-market products within days. In clothing manufacturing, it is important to distinguish between preassembly of garments (design, marker-making, or putting the patterns on the fabric, spreading the fabric, cutting, and bundling operations) and garment assembly. Most of the innovations in production and information technologies are taking pla

North American Influences on West European Dress

Rebecca Arnold

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

North America’s effect on West European fashion is often viewed only in relation to Hollywood and celebrity. However, its influence has been far more diverse, from technological inventions to leisure wear and the professionalization of the industry.

Ethical Fashion and Ecofashion

Sandy Black

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Although the fashion industry is fast-moving and often dismissed as frivolous, it represents one of the major global economic players. Fashion is one of the few remaining craft-based industries, relying on skilled manual labour for manufacturing across its wide spectrum of levels, which raises particular issues for production. There is an urgent need to reconcile ethical, environmental, social, and personal agendas through future product development and manufacturing cycles in the fashion industr

Size and Fit in Industrially Produced Clothes

Karen Borregaard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The defining characteristic of ready-to-wear clothes, which differentiates them from made-to-measure clothes, is that they are produced in standard sizes to fit individuals whose exact body dimensions are not known by producers. The aim of standard sizes is to fit as many in a target group as possible. Size refers to both a garment’s measurements and the way size is communicated to customers. In addition, each ready-to-wear style is produced in a range of sizes, known as a sizing system. The numb

Fashion Cities

Christopher Breward

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The history of Western fashion is closely related to the history of urban life. As cultural geographer David Gilbert has claimed, this complex relationship underpins contemporary understandings of global fashion as a system orchestrated around a shifting network of world cities, particularly Paris, New York, London, Milan, and Tokyo but also incorporating (at various times) Moscow, Vienna, Berlin, São Paulo, Kuwait City, Cape Town, Barcelona, Antwerp, Delhi, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Hong Kong

The Art, Craft, and Business of Tailoring

Milva Fiorella Di Lorenzo

Source: Tailoring Techniques for Fashion, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After you have read this chapter, you should be able to discuss:

Global Positioning of Australian Fashion

Robyn Healy

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Over the years Australia has found it difficult to establish a presence in the fashion centers of Europe and the United States. Yet when Sydney fashion designer Collette Dinnigan staged a full-scale parade in the 1995 official Paris ready-to-wear calendar, it changed forever the perception of Australian fashion as being somewhat out of touch. This defining moment sparked debate and extensive media coverage about a new wave of emerging designers and was crucial in the development of the local indu

Copying French Couture for American Consumers

Sara Idacavage

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Throughout the first half of the twentieth century, it was common practice for American dress manufacturers and designers to directly copy clothing styles designed by Parisian couturiers, or to adapt them slightly to better meet the tastes of female American consumers. Twice a year, retail buyers, independent designers, manufacturers, publicists, and journalists from the United States traveled to Paris to view the latest couture collections. As the French couture industry was not able to cater to

The Fashion Industry

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The origin of garment making is traceable to when humans started covering their bodies. Western clothes changed from the unconstructed dress of the ancient Mediterranean world to the more structured garments of the late Middle Ages. Western apparel became more intricate, requiring increasingly specialized skills for its construction. Before the Industrial Revolution that began in England in the latter half of the eighteenth century, making clothes was an arduous task, and quality garments were an

New Zealand Textiles and Apparel Sectors

R. M. Laing and C. A. Wilson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Development of the textile and apparel sectors in New Zealand can be traced from settler society to the early twenty-first century, influenced by geography, communication, trade policies and agreements, government assistance, and fashion and technical developments of Western Europe and the United States. During this period there were times of dependence, then relative self-sufficiency in the late nineteenth and much of the early twentieth century. The change to greater dependency on imports durin

The Dynamics of Fashion in West Europe

Bo Lönnqvist

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in Europe can be defined as a cultural phenomenon since about 1500. Sociological definitions of fashion have emphasized collective and individualistic processes, expressed in such notions as: leaders and adherents, court fashion, bourgeois fashion and social class, fashion restrictions, and mass fashion. All can be found in West Europe, where modern fashion originated. Social change, reflected in changing fashions, has been closely connected with cultural change. Sumptuary laws promulgate

Trends

Maria Mackinney-Valentin

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

One of the defining features of fashion can be said to be the constant change in its visual expression. The term trend is often employed to describe the motor that drives fashion; it can refer to both fashion change (innovation) and fashion adoption behavior (diffusion). A trend may involve a certain item of dress, a way of wearing an item, or a certain style, silhouette, material, color, or pattern. In fashion theory, fashion process and fashion cycle are sometimes used as synonyms for trend.

Globalization and Dress

Margaret Maynard

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The trading of articles of dress, cloth, body adornments, precious stones, oils, and perfumes across wide areas of the globe, whether by sea, river, or overland routes, has taken place for centuries. All manner of cultural transfers and modifications of dress have eventuated because of migrations, diasporic movements, and subjugation of peoples. Something very different, though, is the globalization of dress, the increasing dominance of mass-produced standardized clothing across the world, which

Fragrances and Perfumes

Brian Moeran

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The development of modern perfume may be traced to the court of Louis XIV (1643–1715), whose palace at Versailles had no bathrooms. Quantities of perfume were used at court, primarily to mask odors. In the fifth century, an Arab perfumer, Avicenna, had pioneered the distillation of rose water. Arab perfumers established businesses in Granada, and from the eleventh century onwards, the crusaders brought back knowledge of Oriental fragrances to Europe. The first alcohol-based eau de toilette was l’

Customer Focus

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers, 3rd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The importance of focusing on a specific market and customer is directly linked to the job search process. Each clothing company has a reputation for a particular kind of clothing. This is not to say a company cannot make more than one product. Those that have divisions or licensees most certainly offer a variety of merchandise. When interviewing for any company, it is essential to research that company to better understand its range of products, look, fabric/color direction, and price point. Tho

European Retailers and Global Sourcing Networks

Lotte Thomsen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The sourcing networks of global buyers have spread over a large range of countries and regions, and clothing consumption in West Europe in the early twenty-first century is almost entirely fed by imports from developing countries. There are considerable differences in the sourcing policies and practices of major West European retailers. But in the early twenty-first century, clothing sourcing networks—especially those based in Anglo-Saxon countries—are reaching a level of maturity that imposes ne

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 30 (2 pages)
Page 1 of 2