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Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Dress, Self-Fashioning and Display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Christine Guth

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Isabella Stewart Gardner negotiated a prominent public position for herself in Boston through the establishment of a museum that promoted a different attitude towards art than those founded with the aim of educating the public. She assembled her collection as an individual, producing a competing, but equally ideologically motivated account of what she regarded as art. Her collection embraced the cultures of Europe and Asia, but also gave recognition to products of female craft such as lace. While

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Dai Rees

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Minimalism: Donald Judd Or Ikea?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Minimalist artists constructed simple, monochromatic, geometric objects of formal symmetry, characterized by an absence of traditional composition. Minimalism was an extreme abstract art, not imitative but solipsistic, self-referential: it was unto itself, harking back to the idea of truth to materials whose lineage can be located in the Russian Constructivists (particularly Rodchenko, AleksandrRodchenko and El Lissitzky) through to Moore, HenryMoore, Hepworth, BarbaraHepworth, Gabo, NoamGabo, Pe

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

‘At Once Classical and Modern’: Raymond Duncan Dress and Textiles in the Royal Ontario Museum

Alexandra Palmer

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

I first learned about Raymond Duncan from a lecture on men in togas given by Lou Taylor in the mid-1980s. She showed an astonishing image from the turn of the century of a man walking along the banks of the Seine wearing a draped toga, sandals and pushing an enormous black perambulator. I was flabbergasted, not only by his appearance, but also by the fact that I had not heard nor read about such a colourful character during my years studying art, fashion and textile history. Since seeing his text

The Empress’s Old Clothes: Biographies of African Dress at the Victoria And Albert Museum

Nicola Stylianou

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

On 20 April 1869 the V&A accessioned a number of objects from Ethiopia including clothes and jewellery that were listed in the museum register as having been given to the museum by the ‘Secretary of State for India’ and ‘belonging formerly to the Queen of Abyssinia’ (V&A 1869). At this time the V&A had not yet been divided into departments with objects being accepted for inclusion in the museum on the grounds of design excellence or as demonstrations of particular techniques. Included in this gif

Picturing the Material/Manifesting the Visual: Aesthetic Dress in Late-Nineteenth-Century British Culture

Kimberly Wahl

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

The complex relationship between material forms of clothing and visual/literary representations of ‘fashion’ is nowhere more clearly articulated than in the dress practices of nineteenth-century Aestheticism. From the 1870s to the 1890s, Aesthetic dress in Britain was characterized by its comfort, elegance and adherence to classical and medieval dress-ideals. Initially based on earlier Pre-Raphaelite models, Aesthetic dress was eclectic and historicist, merging Antique or medieval models with pic

Appraised, Displayed, and Concealed: Fashion Photography on The Swedish Museum Stage

Anna Dahlgren

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Röhsska Museet, founded in 1916, is dedicated to fashion, design, and craft. It currently holds a collection of 50,000 artifacts; dresses and accessories and other artifacts from the fashion system, but the collection contains only a handful of fashion photographs.When this text was written in 2011 Röhsska had not a single fashion photograph in the collection, www.designmuseum.se and telephone interview with Anna Billing-Wetterlundh, curator, Röhsska Museet, April 26, 2011. Since then the museum

From Museum of Costume to Fashion Museum: The Case of The Fashion Museum in Bath

Rosemary Harden

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The Fashion Museum, previously known as the Museum of Costume, Bath,The Fashion Museum changed its name from the Museum of Costume, Bath, in 2007 following an extensive consultation exercise which found that “fashion” was the term that better reflected both the nature of the collection and visitor expectations. “Costume” was regarded as a term for dress to be put on to play a role, i.e. on the stage. has been situated in the Assembly Rooms in the Georgian city of Bath for nearly fifty years, and

Exhibiting The Body, Dress, and Time in Museums: A Historical Perspective

Anne-Sofie Hjemdahl

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The headless mannequins are so filled with character that one can easily imagine the missing faces with their hairstyles and hats.

Autobiography as A Proposed Approach to A Fashion Exhibition

Jeff Horsley

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Before embarking on the construction of my own fashion autobiography, I reviewed a number of recent exhibitions for evidence of fashion autobiographic content. The majority of these exhibitions I had visited personally and documented through photography and notes, supplementing this material through reference to accompanying publications and online resources. Other exhibitions are evaluated solely through review of their catalog. While not ideal, I concluded that such publications could arguably

The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: An Evolving History

Harold Koda and Jessica Glasscock

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

By 1938, 400 objects had been assembled and Bernstein was presenting a series of talks on costume history. Lewisohn headed the Museum’s committee, planning it as “a source of authentic information and inspiration to stylists, couturiers, designers, and manufacturers” (New York Times 1937: 28). They were joined by textile authority M.D.C. Crawford, who had been instrumental in starting the Design Laboratory (the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s costume study collection), the production designer Lee Simons

Class and Gender in A Museum Collection: Female Skiwear

Marianne Larsson

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Urban middle-class women have been active in open-air activities and sports since the end of the nineteenth century. When men could easily wear a used woolen suit, women had to challenge the fashion of corseted waists and full-length skirts, as well as the conventions that excluded them from physical exercise in public and outside. In this study, I want to show how women’s desire for outdoor life has influenced their ski clothing according to new social and cultural patterns. With a focus on fema

Introduction: Understanding Fashion and Dress Museology

Marie Riegels Melchior

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The question of why fashion has become significantly popular in museums seems at first to offer an almost obvious conclusion: it is a fashion. Like other areas of society, it can be argued that museums are embedded in the discourse of fashion and the attraction of the new. The Swedish ethnologist Orvar Löfgren uses the term “catwalk economycatwalk economy” to describe the contemporary invasion of the fashion industry and its catwalk technologies into the corporate world (Löfgren 2005). The catwal

Contemporary Fashion History in Museums

Marco Pecorari

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

As Alexandra Palmer, AlexandraPalmer argues, the continuous proliferation of alternative forms of exhibiting dress in connection with some specific economic and practical museological reasons brought many fashion museums to favor the exhibition of contemporary dress (Palmer 2008: 36). Such a turn from historical dress to contemporary dress brought diverse fashion museums to dismiss the important tradition of dress history while, at the same time, simplifying the current discussion on fashion hist

Gender Considerations in Fashion History Exhibitions

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

It was because of the connections between the worlds of economy and history that historical fashion entered and was interpreted in museums. Indeed, one of the first suggestions for a British museum of costume came from a satire on the consumerist tendencies of fashion-mad women. In an 1847Punch article titled “Hints for the British Museum Commission,” the anonymous author suggested that rather than natural history specimens, examples of fashion might induce “the softer sex to find attractions in

Engaging The Public in Issues of Dress And Identity: A Case Study of Amagermuseet in Denmark

Ingeborg Philipsen

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

In Denmark we do not have a tradition of wearing regional folk dress on special occasions as they do in the other Scandinavian countries, especially in Norway (Haugen 2011). Amager, however, makes an exception for this rule in Denmark: what is known as the Amager folk dress still constitutes a central element in building and reproducing the local community’s identity as does the history of the Dutch settlement. Many local men and women in this community of 11,700 citizens still pursue their Dutch

Learning Through Fashion: The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology

Tone Rasch and Ingebjørg Eidhammer

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The educational program is designed for history classes from the third year of high school when students are about 18 years old. It consists of a general tour of the museum exhibition that deals with the Industrial Revolution, focusing on the textile industry. Secondly, the students look at different original primary sources such as letters, an account book, and a sample book from the Hjula archive. After that the students receive a box with copies of selected sources and a question booklet relat

In Conclusion: Museums Dressed in Fashion

Birgitta Svensson

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

brandingtourismMuseu Nacional do Traje e da Moda (Portugal)Museums tend to adapt to management strategies to survive by attracting the growing heritage industry and the tourism economy. When visiting Lisbon in 2011 I found it strikingly easy to find the new fashion and design museum MUDE—Museu do Design e da Moda. It was located in a spectacular architecturally designed building in the very busy city center and shopping district, among the main tourist attractions. The museum tries to convey an i

Understanding Fashion Through The Museum

José Teunissen

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

visual artWhen “Streetstyle: From Sidewalk to Catwalk” opened at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) in 1994, it was one of the most significant fashion exhibitions to be based on cultural theory and the book Subculture by Dick Hebdige (Steele 2008: 23).The exhibition was accompanied by the publication of the book Streetstyle by anthropologist Ted Polhemus, who as its creator and curator interpreted the exhibition from an anthropological viewpoint. For the first time, the starting point was n

Collecting Practice: Designmuseum Danmark

Kirsten Toftegaard

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

As an art museum, Designmuseum Danmark is selective in collecting, and the overall collecting criteria constitute a combination of form, function, material, and execution seen from an aesthetic point of view. It has been and still is the intention to collect contemporary as well as historical cutting-edge or leading design, which in one way or another belongs to the avant-garde. As long as it is considered to fall into this criterion, the museum should not differentiate between for instance a pie

Evidence about Dress in Canada

Christina Bates

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Dress in Canada is a complex topic, encompassed by seventeenth-century New France, the settling of the west in the late nineteenth century, and the growing multicultural cities of the twenty-first century. Canada is a land of immigrants, from the founding nations of France and England, to the waves of European and now Asian immigration. There is the strong influence of England on the Commonwealth nation, and of the United States. The study of dress is spread unevenly across Canada, engaging acade

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