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‘Look At Me I’M Different!’: Identity Art And The Expectations Of Race

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

National identification is an exemplary case of how an external border is reflected into an internal limit. Of course, the first step towards the identity of the nation is defined through differences from other nations, via an external border: if I identify myself as an Englishman, I distinguish myself from the French, German, Scots, Irish, and so on. However, in the next stage, the question is raised of who among the English are ‘the real English’, the paradigm of Englishness; who are the Englis

Come Fly With Me: Participatory Art, Interactivity And Audience Involvement

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

interactivityinteractivityparticipatory artaudience involvementrelational aestheticsRelational Aesthetics is also when a successful artist, um, who is too busy touring the globe going from biennial to biennial, and they have no time to make physical art objects any more, so the famous artist uses the attendees at the exhibition as the artwork in some way, you know what I’m saying, like to explore the social relationships between people and y’know this kind of practice is really good when you’re a

Minimalism: Donald Judd Or Ikea?

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Minimalist artists constructed simple, monochromatic, geometric objects of formal symmetry, characterized by an absence of traditional composition. Minimalism was an extreme abstract art, not imitative but solipsistic, self-referential: it was unto itself, harking back to the idea of truth to materials whose lineage can be located in the Russian Constructivists (particularly Rodchenko, AleksandrRodchenko and El Lissitzky) through to Moore, HenryMoore, Hepworth, BarbaraHepworth, Gabo, NoamGabo, Pe

Video Art And Videophilia

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

From the beginning, video art was understood as anti-establishment. It can lay claim to a unique origin: unlike other visual arts media, it was forged in the crucible of contemporary, rather than modern, classical or ancient, art. It had no tradition so was not beholden to it. It had no canon so could start from scratch in response to its immediate circumstances. It had no critical discourse so was not accountable to it. It promised to democratize the production of images. Video art emerged at th

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art 2015

Book chapter

Fashion 1970s–2000s

Colleen Hill

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

In London, the Victoria and Albert Museum’s 1971 exhibition “Fashion: An Anthology by Cecil Beaton” attracted more than 90,000 visitors, making it one of the most well attended shows in the museum’s history. While Beaton acquired examples of historical dress from some of Britain’s most fashionable women, he placed particular emphasis on recent fashion—a largely unprecedented idea. Also important was the exhibition’s experimental installation, created in part by professional store window dressers

Appraised, Displayed, and Concealed: Fashion Photography on The Swedish Museum Stage

Anna Dahlgren

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Röhsska Museet, founded in 1916, is dedicated to fashion, design, and craft. It currently holds a collection of 50,000 artifacts; dresses and accessories and other artifacts from the fashion system, but the collection contains only a handful of fashion photographs.When this text was written in 2011 Röhsska had not a single fashion photograph in the collection, www.designmuseum.se and telephone interview with Anna Billing-Wetterlundh, curator, Röhsska Museet, April 26, 2011. Since then the museum

From Museum of Costume to Fashion Museum: The Case of The Fashion Museum in Bath

Rosemary Harden

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The Fashion Museum, previously known as the Museum of Costume, Bath,The Fashion Museum changed its name from the Museum of Costume, Bath, in 2007 following an extensive consultation exercise which found that “fashion” was the term that better reflected both the nature of the collection and visitor expectations. “Costume” was regarded as a term for dress to be put on to play a role, i.e. on the stage. has been situated in the Assembly Rooms in the Georgian city of Bath for nearly fifty years, and

Exhibiting The Body, Dress, and Time in Museums: A Historical Perspective

Anne-Sofie Hjemdahl

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The headless mannequins are so filled with character that one can easily imagine the missing faces with their hairstyles and hats.

Autobiography as A Proposed Approach to A Fashion Exhibition

Jeff Horsley

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Before embarking on the construction of my own fashion autobiography, I reviewed a number of recent exhibitions for evidence of fashion autobiographic content. The majority of these exhibitions I had visited personally and documented through photography and notes, supplementing this material through reference to accompanying publications and online resources. Other exhibitions are evaluated solely through review of their catalog. While not ideal, I concluded that such publications could arguably

The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: An Evolving History

Harold Koda and Jessica Glasscock

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

By 1938, 400 objects had been assembled and Bernstein was presenting a series of talks on costume history. Lewisohn headed the Museum’s committee, planning it as “a source of authentic information and inspiration to stylists, couturiers, designers, and manufacturers” (New York Times 1937: 28). They were joined by textile authority M.D.C. Crawford, who had been instrumental in starting the Design Laboratory (the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s costume study collection), the production designer Lee Simons

Class and Gender in A Museum Collection: Female Skiwear

Marianne Larsson

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

Urban middle-class women have been active in open-air activities and sports since the end of the nineteenth century. When men could easily wear a used woolen suit, women had to challenge the fashion of corseted waists and full-length skirts, as well as the conventions that excluded them from physical exercise in public and outside. In this study, I want to show how women’s desire for outdoor life has influenced their ski clothing according to new social and cultural patterns. With a focus on fema

Introduction: Understanding Fashion and Dress Museology

Marie Riegels Melchior

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The question of why fashion has become significantly popular in museums seems at first to offer an almost obvious conclusion: it is a fashion. Like other areas of society, it can be argued that museums are embedded in the discourse of fashion and the attraction of the new. The Swedish ethnologist Orvar Löfgren uses the term “catwalk economycatwalk economy” to describe the contemporary invasion of the fashion industry and its catwalk technologies into the corporate world (Löfgren 2005). The catwal

Contemporary Fashion History in Museums

Marco Pecorari

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

As Alexandra Palmer, AlexandraPalmer argues, the continuous proliferation of alternative forms of exhibiting dress in connection with some specific economic and practical museological reasons brought many fashion museums to favor the exhibition of contemporary dress (Palmer 2008: 36). Such a turn from historical dress to contemporary dress brought diverse fashion museums to dismiss the important tradition of dress history while, at the same time, simplifying the current discussion on fashion hist

Gender Considerations in Fashion History Exhibitions

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

It was because of the connections between the worlds of economy and history that historical fashion entered and was interpreted in museums. Indeed, one of the first suggestions for a British museum of costume came from a satire on the consumerist tendencies of fashion-mad women. In an 1847Punch article titled “Hints for the British Museum Commission,” the anonymous author suggested that rather than natural history specimens, examples of fashion might induce “the softer sex to find attractions in

Engaging The Public in Issues of Dress And Identity: A Case Study of Amagermuseet in Denmark

Ingeborg Philipsen

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

In Denmark we do not have a tradition of wearing regional folk dress on special occasions as they do in the other Scandinavian countries, especially in Norway (Haugen 2011). Amager, however, makes an exception for this rule in Denmark: what is known as the Amager folk dress still constitutes a central element in building and reproducing the local community’s identity as does the history of the Dutch settlement. Many local men and women in this community of 11,700 citizens still pursue their Dutch

Learning Through Fashion: The Norwegian Museum of Science and Technology

Tone Rasch and Ingebjørg Eidhammer

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

The educational program is designed for history classes from the third year of high school when students are about 18 years old. It consists of a general tour of the museum exhibition that deals with the Industrial Revolution, focusing on the textile industry. Secondly, the students look at different original primary sources such as letters, an account book, and a sample book from the Hjula archive. After that the students receive a box with copies of selected sources and a question booklet relat

In Conclusion: Museums Dressed in Fashion

Birgitta Svensson

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

brandingtourismMuseu Nacional do Traje e da Moda (Portugal)Museums tend to adapt to management strategies to survive by attracting the growing heritage industry and the tourism economy. When visiting Lisbon in 2011 I found it strikingly easy to find the new fashion and design museum MUDE—Museu do Design e da Moda. It was located in a spectacular architecturally designed building in the very busy city center and shopping district, among the main tourist attractions. The museum tries to convey an i

Understanding Fashion Through The Museum

José Teunissen

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

visual artWhen “Streetstyle: From Sidewalk to Catwalk” opened at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) in 1994, it was one of the most significant fashion exhibitions to be based on cultural theory and the book Subculture by Dick Hebdige (Steele 2008: 23).The exhibition was accompanied by the publication of the book Streetstyle by anthropologist Ted Polhemus, who as its creator and curator interpreted the exhibition from an anthropological viewpoint. For the first time, the starting point was n

Collecting Practice: Designmuseum Danmark

Kirsten Toftegaard

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

As an art museum, Designmuseum Danmark is selective in collecting, and the overall collecting criteria constitute a combination of form, function, material, and execution seen from an aesthetic point of view. It has been and still is the intention to collect contemporary as well as historical cutting-edge or leading design, which in one way or another belongs to the avant-garde. As long as it is considered to fall into this criterion, the museum should not differentiate between for instance a pie

Laver, James

Michael Carter

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Laver was fascinated by the effects that the passing of time has upon people and their works. He was greatly influenced in his theory of time by a notion of zeitgeist, or “time spirit,” a concept taken from nineteenth-century German philosophy. Zeitgeist proposes the existence of a collective psychological, or spiritual, entity that imparts a distinctive pattern of aims and emphases to a culture, nation, or historical epoch. Drawing on this idea of cultural unity, Laver concluded that every aspec

Dress and Fashion Exhibits

Jean L. Druesedow

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Examples of secular and ecclesiastical dress have been part of the founding collections of many of the world’s great museums. In the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, in private “cabinets of curiosities” that were the forerunners of many museums as institutions, elements of dress were collected in part to represent the curious and strange, in part for the artistry of the textiles and ornamentation. A number of museums have been founded on the basis of private collections, and

Introduction: Dress and Fashion in the Context of the Museum

Amy de la Haye

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Until very recently many collections of dress and fashion were generically described as costume. With reference to fashion (the creative expression of designers that can form a trend) and style (the individual look styled by the wearer of fashionable clothes or to signal subcultural allegiances for instance), the Museum of Costume in Bath has been renamed the Fashion Museum. The collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum, formerly described as dress (which can be used as a verb or as a noun ref

Moore, Doris Langley

Michele Majer

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

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