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Charitable Non-Love and Philanthrocapitalism

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chapter 4 further develops the theme of power relations between design and craft and between the rich and the poor. Many designers working with craftspeople also run non-governmental organizations to ‘empower’ these workers, while cultivating the rhetoric of ethical business and philanthropy, and offering their customers in addition to luxurious clothing also good conscience. Such NGOs and trusts become effective tools of co-option of the village workforce into the capitalist system and reproduce

Introduction

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

White Lotus, the theme of the funeral that has transported us into the world of fashion designers and the South Delhi business elite, is a fitting metaphor for the key motif of this book. It is also a fitting metaphor for the ethnographic journey in which this work is grounded and for its analytical angle. Like the lotus, the beauties ritualof Indian fashion and heritage luxuryheritage luxury cannot be conceived without their juxtaposition, without the mud from which they grow and that brings the

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

The People and Places of Costume Production

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Cultural fields are vulnerable to the effects of time in that no field can be expected to remain the same, even as its products and its rationale appear consistent. The essential framework of costume production in Mumbai has remained the same for nearly one hundred years, including its institutional figures (on-set costumers, or dressmen) and local economic contingencies (the vast number and versatility of tailors in the city). But any conversation with retired personnel brings to light the chang

Costume and Character: Wearing and Being

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

My clothes may express the dressmaker, but they don’t express me.

Costume and the Body

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The difference between a costume designer and fashion designer? The boutiques, they can just provide you with a salwar kurta, but not a good fit. For a film you require to be perfect. If you have a defect on the shoulders, if you have a defect on your arm, if you have a defect on your waist or hips, it is the costume designer who has to work on that and see how you are looking. Whatever defect is there in your body has to be removed.

Fashion and Spectacle

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.

Dressing the Past

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The demands of costuming for period films are, in some ways, comparable to those for contemporary films. At the same time, they are distinctly different, since the clothes must evoke in viewers a sense of a past of which they typically have little or no direct experience.This is the “veridiction contract” (Calefato 2004, 92), which refers to the production of “truth” within constrained social and historical circumstances. In other words, not only must what is considered to be true conform to cert

Beyond the Screen

Clare M. Wilkinson-Weber

Source: Fashioning Bollywood. The Making and Meaning of Hindi Film Costume, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Who ever saw his old clothes—his old coat, actually worn out, resolved into its primitive elements, so that it was not a deed of charity to bestow it on some poor boy…

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