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How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Islamic Style

Magdalena Crăciun

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion designers have found inspiration in past and present sartorial repertoires. Islamically appropriate forms of covered dress have aesthetically been drawn upon as well. Consequently, headscarves, face veils and head-to-toe outerwear have occasionally appeared on the catwalk. Fashion commentators have pointed out that such creations and assemblages referenced ethic, traditional, historical, exotic or oriental dress, and only rarely labelled their source of inspiration as Islamic style. The n

Moroccan Fashion as Tradition

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there have been a number of political events that have had an important impact on the development of Moroccan fashion. Under the French FrenchProtectorateProtectorate, for example, it was decided to separate the new European city centres from the indigenousindigenous Arab city centres. This resulted in a cultural buffer against French cultural influences, allowing the continuity of a Moroccan lifestylelifestyle. Over time, this led to two more

Şule Yüksel Şenler: An Early Style Icon of Urban Islamic Fashion in Turkey

Rustem Ertug Altinay

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The formative years of the Republic of Turkey were characterized by a series of social and legal reforms implemented under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in order to construct a secular (albeit implicitly Sunni Muslim), modern, Western nation-state with an authentic Turkish essence. In Turkey’s modernization and nation-building program, women were imagined as the builders of a new life, ‘a modern way of living both in the private and the public spaces’ (Göle 1997: 51). They were expected

Covering Up on the Prairies: Perceptions of Muslim Identity, Multiculturalism and Security in Canada

A. Brenda Anderson and F. Volker Greifenhagen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Canadian mediaOur analysis is restricted to the English-language media and does not include French Canadian publications. tend to portray headcovering as a practice that is forced on women; one can never assume that it is the women’s free choice.For example, ‘The majority of women wearing face coverings are not doing so because of free will; they are doing so because some Neanderthal husband or cleric has told them it is necessary’ (Martinuk 2011; see also Bramham 2010; Kay 2010). According t

‘I Love My Prophet’: Religious Taste, Consumption and Distinction in Berlin

Synnøve Bendixsen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The majority of mosque associations and prayer rooms in Berlin were established by the so-called first-generation migrants who arrived as guest workers in Germany in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These religious organizations and places are mostly divided along ethno-national lines in terms of their participants, language of instruction and religious references. In contrast, the religious youth organization MJD was established in 1994 by eight young Muslims with various ethnic and national back

Miss Headscarf: Islamic Fashion and the Danish Media

Connie Carøe Christiansen

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Whilst cultural commentators tended to downplay the aesthetic potential of the headscarf, contestants were generally more sensitive to its potential both as an item of fashion and self-cultivation. They were also conscious of the need to challenge perceptions of Muslim women through their appearance. In several of the Danish newspaper articles which featured the contest, young Muslim women in Denmark were given the opportunity to speak and to present another angle on the headscarf to that usually

Closet Tales from a Turkish Cultural Center in the ‘Petro Metro’, Houston, Texas

Maria Curtis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Turquoise Center, or the Turkish Cultural Center as it is commonly called, consists of the Raindrop Turkish House and the Istanbul Conference Center (Figure 7.2). It reaches out to Turkish Americans, American converts and anyone interested in learning about Turkey. Raindrop Turkish House estimates Turks constitute 6,000 of Houston’s 250,000 Muslims. Whereas some of them came decades ago and have lived mainly secular lifestyles, younger practising women have often come to Houston with a well-d

Perspectives on Muslim Dress in Poland: A Tatar View

Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska and Michał Łyszczarz

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Numbering around 3,000–5,000 people, Tatars constitute one of the smallest ethnic groups in Poland. Centuries of living in a mainstream Polish and Catholic society and being isolated from any other Tatar or Muslim population resulted in their losing a lot of their cultural heritage. However, it was not so much the pressure from the outside world as the willingness of Tatars to integrate, or even assimilate, that has informed Tatar clothing choices. Historically, soon after reaching Lithuania and

Transnational Networks of Veiling-fashion between Turkey and Western Europe

Banu Gökarıksel and Anna Secor

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Turkish veiling-fashion industry, while paralleling many of the broader trends in apparel production in Turkey, nonetheless has a unique profile. In the autumn of 2008, we conducted a detailed survey with 174 veiling-fashion firms (that is, firms with 10 per cent or more of their production in Islamic dress for women), which we identified through the membership lists of textile associations, advertising and industry fairs. We estimate that there are a total of 200 to 225 such firms in the cou

Hijab on the Shop Floor: Muslims in Fashion Retail in Britain

Reina Lewis

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

UK employment law has shifted in recent years from equal opportunities legislation which outlawed discrimination on the grounds of race and ethnicity to new policies concerned more broadly with diversity. In 2003, the UK Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations brought the United Kingdom in line with the European Employment Equality Directive of 2000, extending legal protection to cover discrimination ‘on the grounds of perceived as well as actual religion or belief’.

Burqinis, Bikinis and Bodies: Encounters in Public Pools in Italy and Sweden

Pia Karlsson Minganti

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The burqini is often met with resistance. Muslim women are considered to cover themselves too much. Their habits differ from ours, whether in Sweden and Italy or elsewhere in Europe. One day I experienced how this taken-for-granted assumption on European homogeneity is challenged. During a stay in Italy, I had decided to go swimming at a public swimming bath. While in the shower, washing myself before going into the pool, I noticed an information panel on the wall. It stated the regulations, incl

Fashion and Its Discontents: The Aesthetics of Covering in the Netherlands

Annelies Moors

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

A convenient starting point to discuss the fashion-Islam nexus is the eight-page article ‘Hip with the Headscarf’. Appearing in 1999 in the weekend magazine of an upscale Dutch daily, Volkskrant Magazine, this article started with the observation that ‘more and more women with headscarves wear fashionable styles of dress and lots of make-up’ (Jungschleger and Riemersma 1999). Next to portraying a number of young women wearing such fashionable styles, it also presented the points of view of ‘expe

Introduction: Islamic Fashion and Anti-fashion: New Perspectives from Europe and North America

Annelies Moors and Emma Tarlo

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

What does dress have to do with religion? Conventionally, religion has been studied in terms of doctrine and institutions and more recently, especially in the case of Islam, as a sociopolitical movement and threat to secularism. With a focus on Islamic fashion, and the everyday corporeal practices of young Muslim women, the starting point of this book is different. We argue that to better understand the importance of dress to religion, we need to go beyond the modernist concept of religion, groun

Mediating Islamic Looks

Degla Salim

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The field of fashion is an industry of images (McRobbie 1998: 172). Imagery dominates the industry to such a degree that the distinction between what is really being sold, the garment or the image of the garment, has become increasingly blurry (cf. Baudrillard 1975).The image of the garment is here referred to in a double sense. Image is meant to be regarded as both a consumable photograph of the clothes and as a social ‘image’, an aura that the garment carries. When it comes to understanding the

The Clothing Dilemmas of Transylvanian Muslim Converts

Daniela Stoica

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The Transylvanian city of Cluj-Napoca has lost much of the visual uniformity that dominated it during the socialist and immediate post-socialist periods. With elegant or bohemian cafeterias, stylish dining rooms and clubs, it has become a setting that stands in sharp contrast to the uniform socialist neighbourhoods created under communism. At the beginning of the summer, when the Transylvania International Film Festival animates the city with a young and diverse public, and at the beginning of au

Landscapes of Attraction and Rejection: South Asian Aestheticsin Islamic Fashion in London

Emma Tarlo

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The most obvious feature of dress is its proximity to the body and the intimacy of our relationship to it. Whilst sociologists of the wardrobe rightly remind us that some clothing remains forever unworn or may be kept only for special occasions, it is nonetheless true that it is through being worn that dress springs into life and attains its primary purpose. This intimate relationship between our bodies and our clothes is not, however, without potential conflict. Bodies animate clothes, but they

‘Fashion Is the Biggest Oxymoron in My Life’: Fashion Blogger, Designer and Cover Girl Zinah Nur Sharif in Conversation with Emma Tarlo

Emma Tarlo and Annelies Moors (eds)

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Edited version of an interview conducted over email by Emma Tarlo in October 2012.

Made in France: Islamic Fashion Companies on Display

Leila Karin Österlind

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

The fashion retailing company Amal-mode has two shops in the outskirts of Paris.The two shops are situated in Saint-Denis and Sarcelles. In the bazaar, it had chosen to separate its goods into three categories, each with their own stand. At one of these stands, only festive dress was sold. Items of more modest dress such as jilbabs, abayas, Jilbabs and abayas are both full-length outer garments, somewhat similar to kaftans.khimarsLong, modest headscarf model that covers the shoulders and sometime

The Genealogy of the Turkish Pardösü in the Netherlands

R. Arzu Ünal

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America 2013

Book chapter

Three-quarter-length overcoats were the most commonly worn outdoor attire mentioned in the accounts of migrant women coming to the Netherlands in the late 1970s. A few Turkish women came alone as workers;most of them were the wives of guest workers and came as temporary residents. The first generation of migrant women described that particular style of overcoat as the first modern and şehirli(urban) item of outdoor clothing they had ever worn. These were relatively close-fitting overcoats, intend

Multiple Meanings of the ‘Hijab’ in Contemporary France

Malcolm D. Brown

Source: Dressed to Impress. Looking the Part 2011

Book chapter

The affaire du foulard first came to prominence in the autumn of 1989, shortly after France had celebrated the bicentenary of the Revolution, when three Muslim schoolgirls in the town of Creil, not far from Paris, were expelled for wearing the hijab, and refusing to remove it. In so doing, they were judged to have infringed secular Republican principles, or, more accurately, the principle of laïcité, which had been developed from the ideas of the Revolution, and was held to be an important guaran

Somalia

Heather Marie Akou

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Somalia is located in the Horn of Africa. The northern coast is less than one hundred miles from the Arabian Peninsula and shares a great deal of history and dress with that region. In the cities, houses are built with thick walls to keep out the heat; in the deserts, nomadic people live in shelters constructed of branches covered with leather or plastic, and distinct differences in dress exist. Nomadic dress has typically been more practical and flexible, consisting of leather, cotton wrappers,

Burqini

Heather Marie Akou

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The burqini is a full-body swimsuit that combines the terms burqa and bikini. Aheda Zanetti, an Australian designer of Lebanese descent, created the burqini in 2006 as an alternative form of dress for Muslim women serving as lifeguards in Australia. Within months it became available to the general public worldwide. Buyers have included both Muslims and non-Muslims, who wear it for reasons ranging from modesty, to protection from UV light, to enhanced athletic performance. Similar full-body swimsu

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