Results: Text (352) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 352 (15 pages)
    Page 1 of 15
How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

La Mode Retrouvée

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History 3rd Edition 2017

Book chapter

Chacune de ses robes m’apparaissait comme une ambiance naturelle, nécessaire, comme la projection d’un aspect particulier de son âme.

Superheroes and the fashion of being unfashionable

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

Those superhero costumes that remain most static over time are largely symbolic. When costumes are utilitarian, as with Iron Man (character)Iron Man’s suit, extreme transformation is justifiable as a technological development. By contrast, the costumes of Superman (character)Superman and Wonder WomanWonder Woman, which do little to enhance their performance, remain relatively consistent. Such garments function through stylistic or, following Barthes, RolandBarthes, linguistic expression, more tha

Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Seeing in the dark—sunglasses and “outsider” cool (1940s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Many of the most evocative images show sunglasses worn in the dark, indoors, possibly because in these images we are forced to acknowledge their more oblique functions. Layers of darkness and blackness are compounded by dark frames with dark lenses in many of these images; think of Miles Davis in a murky club, in a dark suit, what light there is just highlighting the sheen of his skin against the intense glossy blackness of his shades.

Dress, Self-Fashioning and Display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Christine Guth

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

Isabella Stewart Gardner negotiated a prominent public position for herself in Boston through the establishment of a museum that promoted a different attitude towards art than those founded with the aim of educating the public. She assembled her collection as an individual, producing a competing, but equally ideologically motivated account of what she regarded as art. Her collection embraced the cultures of Europe and Asia, but also gave recognition to products of female craft such as lace. While

Vivienne Westwood, “On Liberty,” Fall/Winter 1994

Lydia Edwards

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“My job, more than anything, is to idealize women,” Vivienne Westwood has said of her work, including the fall/winter collection “On Liberty,” which premiered in Paris in 1994. Her appropriation of historic styles is well known, but in this collection a reinvention of the bustle, the nineteenth-century skirt support that accented a woman’s behind and allowed for elaborate skirt drapery, is more fluid than similar iterations have been. Westwood’s stark wire cage from 1990, for instance, was not so

Vivienne Westwood’s Elevated Ghillie Shoes from 1993

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” collection, Vivienne Westwood perched her models on extremely elevated platform shoes. Inspired, as most of her collection, by Scottish traditional garments, the platform shoes reinterpreted ancestral ghillies worn for folkloric dances. However, apart from the lacing structure, the shoes were more reminiscent of fetish footwear—an aesthetic typical of Vivienne Westwood’s taste for combining conservatism with subversiveness. When the British designer rein

Underwear from the 1970s to 2000

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From the twentieth century, underwear has acquired a functional and an aesthetic purpose, sometimes serving as a second skin for comfort and at other times as an exoskeleton, reshaping the body’s natural form. It conceals or audaciously reveals women’s intimacy and thus nourishes erotic fantasies in a flirtatious game of “nice meets naughty.” Underwear originally had a function of protection, hygiene, and support; it embodied the existing social boundaries between the hidden intimacy and the publ

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Pam Hogg

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Helen Storey

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Book chapter

Using legacies left to them by their mother Emma, and with financial help from their father, Norman Hartnell and his sister Phyllis opened a couture house on a small scale at 10 Bruton Street, Mayfair in 1923. By 1934 Hartnell had become a very successful and wealthy couture fashion designer, and the firm moved to much larger premises at 26 Bruton Street, employing up to 500 staff and producing thousands of couture garments a year by 1939. A close study of reviews of his fashion collections in th

Moroccan Fashion as Tradition

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity 2015

Book chapter

Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, there have been a number of political events that have had an important impact on the development of Moroccan fashion. Under the French FrenchProtectorateProtectorate, for example, it was decided to separate the new European city centres from the indigenousindigenous Arab city centres. This resulted in a cultural buffer against French cultural influences, allowing the continuity of a Moroccan lifestylelifestyle. Over time, this led to two more

Icons of Modernity: Sixties Fashion and Youth Culture

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture 2015

Book chapter

One of the first media reports on mods, under the headline “Faces without Shadows” and published in Town Magazine in September 1962, provides insight into the consumer practices of these youths (see partial reprint in Rawlings 2000: 42–7). The article revolves around the fifteen-year-old Feld, MarkMark Feld (later, Marc Bolan of the band T-Rex) and his twenty-year-old friends Sugar, PeterPeter Sugar and Simmonds, MichaelMichael Simmonds living in the London neighborhood Stoke Newington. They desc

Sonja Nuttall

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Ghost London

Morna Laing

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Luciano Soprani

Nanna Marie Lund

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Marc Jacobs, Spring/Summer 1995

Hayley-Jane Mazières

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

When the American designer Marc Jacobs appeared on New York’s fashion scene, in 1986, after graduating from the Parsons School of Design, he promptly attracted the attention of the fashion press, which praised his playful yet sophisticated streetwear. During his appointment as Perry Ellis’s creative director from 1988, he dared to launch a groundbreaking grunge collection in 1992—the press loved it; Perry Ellis executives loathed it—and he was publicly suspended from his assignment. Nonetheless,

Gendered Identities, Ideologies and Cultural Difference

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

sheet music coversfunctions ofperformersmarketing song titlesmusic production systemmusic industrymass-marketsmarketingby performerscommercialization, of jazzPrior to the 1920s dominance of phonograph records and radio, a dominant American aesthetic was disseminated into households via illustrated sheet music covers. These booklets contained descriptive cover art, music, lyrics, dance instructions and photographs, publicityphotographs of performers that stimulated popular interest in songwriters,

Beyond The Gardenia: Billie Holiday

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation 2015

Book chapter

Holiday, Billieinfluence of Hollywoodstyleof Billie HolidayHoliday, Billiedress/style ofOn April 7, 1915, Eleanora Fagan, who would later become known as Billie Holiday, was born in Philadelphia to Sadie, a single mother. This simple event did not foreshadow the star that would suddenly shine bright and burn out within a few decades. In Baltimore, Fagan’s Holiday, Billieearly yearsearly years included a laboring mother, an absent father, truancy, rape by a neighbor and time at an institution for

Introducing Japanese Fashion, Past and Present

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

Culture refers to behaviour and beliefs that are learned and shared: learned so it is not ‘instinctual’ and shared so it is not individual. Sharing refers to social sharing but there is no limitation as to the boundaries of this sociality. No territorial or historical boundaries are implied as part of the definition. This Wilson, Elizabeththe ‘format’ and ‘product’ theoryunderstanding of culture is open-ended. Leaning is always ongoing as a function of changing circumstances and therefore culture

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 352 (15 pages)
Page 1 of 15