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Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Lost in A Gaze: Young Men and Fashion in Contemporary Japan

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

‘Do you understand muslins, sir?’JaneAusten, Northanger Abbey (London: Penguin Books, 1996 [1818]), p. 22.

Boy’s Elegance: A Liminality of Boyish Charm and Old-World Suavity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

T-shirts with voluminous scarves are now in store . . . the big scarf looks lovely!Milkboy Staff’s Blog, 2013, available at http://ameblo.jp/mb-staff/page-67.html#main [accessed 7 October 2013]. The texts are translated by Masafumi Monden.

An Ivy Boy and A Preppy Girl: Style Import-Export

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

Taking great care of appearance is the first step of every fashion.

Concluding Japanese Fashion Cultures, Change and Continuity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan 2015

Book chapter

For both men and women, whenever sex is an issue, so also is looking and being seen. Every woman who has ever been accosted on the street knows the temporary desire to be invisible, just as every person of either sex has posed in public, hoping to be regarded as attractive by his or her peers.ValerieSteele, Fashion and Eroticism: Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Jazz Age (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), p. 247.

Bibliographic guide

In academic literature, the words “sex” and “gender” have specific meanings that are interchangeable in popular usage. To the scholar, “sex” is used to denote biological categories (male, female); “gender” is used for distinctions in role, appearance, and behavior that are cultural in origin, but stemming from an individual’s sex (masculinity and femininity). In practice, these classifications are more complex; recent scholarship has begun to take into consideration the fact that biological sex i

The Post-War Market For Men’s Clothing

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Racial Sameness and Racial Difference

Paul Jobling

Source: Advertising Menswear. Masculinity and Fashion in the British Media since 1945 2014

Book chapter

Gender Considerations in Fashion History Exhibitions

Julia Petrov

Source: Fashion and Museums. Theory and Practice 2014

Book chapter

It was because of the connections between the worlds of economy and history that historical fashion entered and was interpreted in museums. Indeed, one of the first suggestions for a British museum of costume came from a satire on the consumerist tendencies of fashion-mad women. In an 1847Punch article titled “Hints for the British Museum Commission,” the anonymous author suggested that rather than natural history specimens, examples of fashion might induce “the softer sex to find attractions in

Consuming Masculinity: Gender, Fashion and TV Celebrity

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture 2014

Book chapter

The 1980s is often cited as an important period during which developments within consumer culture and the fashion industry resulted in increasing media and cultural attention to the male body (Connell 1987; Edwards 1997; Mort 1996; Nixon 1996). Often termed the ‘new man’, a particular incarnation of masculinity emerged which challenged the assumed truth that fashion was an exclusively feminine practice. Writing in the late 1990s, Tim Edwards (1997: 39) suggests that the ‘new man arose as a primar

Peacock Revolution Legacy: American Men’s Fashion in the 1970s

Daniel Delis Hill

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The 1960s peacock revolution in young men’s dress had developed as a visual expression of the young men’s rejection of the conformist, traditional values of their parents and Establishment authorities. Long hair, hiphugger pants, see-through shirts, protest street looks, Nehru jackets, colorful scarves, and love beads had been alarming to the America’s elders. But by the beginning of the 1970s, the once radical looks had become so commercialized by the fashion industry, pop culture, advertising,

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