Results: Text (7) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Dress and Body Image

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As you learned in Chapter 6, “Dress and Physical Appearance,” the body is a very important vehicle in the public presentation of oneself to others. We make assessments of others on the basis of body characteristics and configurations, we categorize others (often unknowingly) based on their body size, color, attractiveness, or other physical features, and we often make evaluations and judgments about their worth (real or imagined) once we have assessed and categorized them. The previous chapter we

La Mode Retrouvée

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Chacune de ses robes m’apparaissait comme une ambiance naturelle, nécessaire, comme la projection d’un aspect particulier de son âme.

An ‘Unexpected Pearl’: Gender And Performativity in the Public and Private Lives of London Couturier Norman Hartnell

Jane Hattrick

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using legacies left to them by their mother Emma, and with financial help from their father, Norman Hartnell and his sister Phyllis opened a couture house on a small scale at 10 Bruton Street, Mayfair in 1923. By 1934 Hartnell had become a very successful and wealthy couture fashion designer, and the firm moved to much larger premises at 26 Bruton Street, employing up to 500 staff and producing thousands of couture garments a year by 1939. A close study of reviews of his fashion collections in th

Gay Men’s Style: From Macaroni to Metrosexual

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The term for the particular form of male style from the late eighteenth century, macaroni (or maccaroni), did in fact come from eating pasta (the Greek makaria literally means ‘food made from barley’), which had become fashionable in the 1760s through men who had returned to England after exploring the European continent, especially Italy, on the Grand Tour. Macaronis typically took pains to announce their difference in outlandish examples of foreign clothing that was either foreign—French and It

Kiss of the Whip: Bondage, Discipline and Sadomasochism, or BDSM Style

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

You modern men, you children of reason, cannot begin to appreciate love as pure bliss and divine serenity; indeed this kind of love is disastrous for men like you, for as soon as you try to be natural you become vulgar. To you Nature is an enemy. You have made devils of the smiling gods of Greece and have turned me into a creature of evil.

The Meaning of Style between Classic and Queer

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It’s part of my bad side.

Queer Fashion

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Queer fashion (henceforth queer style) can be retrospectively linked to flamboyant or transgressive forms of dressing. The term “queer” grew in the late 1980s when scholars and activists began using the term to identify and establish a community that incorporated a broader definition of sexuality, one that encompassed diversity and difference. Prior to this time, alternate sexualities were referred to either as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. Cross-dressing men were known as “drag queens” and cross-dr

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 7 of 7 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1