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Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

Suits You: Men and Tweed, 1919–1952

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Following the First World War, as Jenkins, DavidJenkins clarifies, there was an immediate boom in the wool textiles trade, which for a brief period generated high profits and labor demand.DavidJenkins, “Wool Textiles in the Twentieth Century,” in DavidJenkins, The Cambridge History of Western Textiles, II (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), p. 995. In the company history of Crombie, J. & J. (company)J. & J. Crombie of Aberdeen these developments are described as follows: there was a tr

Society, Menswear and Trends

Aki Choklat

Source: Menswear Trends, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

La Follet (magazine) Fashion and menswear are often influenced by socioeconomic and cultural influences in society, and this has been the case since their earliest days. A historical foundation of trend knowledge is necessary for better analysis and foresight; we can learn much from historical patterns about what men will want to buy in seasons to come. In this chapter we discuss the importance of history and its role in menswear trend practice by looking at some key events and how they influence

Sneakers as Fashion: Reclaiming Masculine Adornment

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion is considered as a complex social practicepractice in which challenges to reform male appearances are sometimes made by figures with the powerpower to expect obedience. Men have also used their appearance as a strategy of refusal or disinterest in the dominant culture that surrounds them. Others have been reformers who tried to convince the populace that their model of dress would lead to better social relationships. (McNeil 2009: 15)

Sneakers as a Symbol of Manhood: Wearing Masculinity on Their Feet

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is a consensus among dress and fashion scholars that human footwear was not always gendered, but there are different accounts as to when footwear became gender-specific. The distinction between ladies’ shoemakers and men’s shoemakers in the eighteenth century clearly indicates that footwear was gendered.

Sneakers as A Subculture: Emerging From Underground to Upperground

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It [subculture] has come to signify the twentieth-century category for youth groups who possess some sort of marked style and shared affiliations. Whereas sociologists use the term to describe an infinitely wider array of groups—sport fishermen, West Texas Baptists, or toy train hobbyists—“subculture” is more popularly used to characterize groups of young people. (Clark 2003: 223, footnote 2)

Introduction: Placing Sneakers within Sociology

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Footwear is a garment characterized by a long history. In prehistoric times, it was a simple piece of wood or leather and was used to protect the foot. Today shoes are more than functional objects. They convey a wide range of meanings associated with fashion, style, personality, sexualitysexuality, gender, and classclass. (Riello 2006: 1)

Conclusion: Future Directions And Possibilities in Footwear Studies

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I initially came to Japan as a teacher. I wanted to be here because there are great sneakers in Japan. Then friends back home started asking me to buy some pairs that are found only in Japan. I started getting so many orders, and I became so busy that I had to quit my teaching job. I now buy and sell sneakers full-time in Tokyo.

The Sneaker Subculture From Durkheimian Perspectives

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

practicetheory andWhat is the purpose of explaining a subculture from a theoretical viewpoint, such as Durkheim’s? There is no sociologysociology without a theory. A social phenomenon without a theory would be a simple description of what goes on around us. As Mills, C. WrightMills (1959) argues, if theory is not connected to practical research, it remains abstract without any concrete evidence and is therefore meaningless. It has to be able to represent people’s ways of living. Similarly, resear

Brief history of contemporary fashion

Chelsea Rousso and Nancy Kaplan Ostroff

Source: Fashion Forward. A Guide to Fashion Forecasting, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The “spirit of the times,” or zeitgeistzeitgeist, refers to the current state of culture: the expression of the present. The mode of an era is determined by a complex mixture of historical, social, psychological, and aesthetic factors. During each era, creative artists and designers are inspired by current influences that they interpret into innovative ideas and products. It is not surprising that there are commonalities that influence an era. New aesthetics, newaesthetics can often be found in v

Punk Style Past and Present

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

leatherbeltshooded sweatshirt (hoodie)craftreconfiguredcolorblackapparelself-identified punkWhat is punk dress and how did it get that way? For some punk style is an obvious reference to green mohawkmohawk hair, a leather jacket, plaid plaidpantspants, and bootscombat bootscombat bootsboots. For others it is an oversized hooded sweatshirt and jeans, clean white shoes, and a wallet accessorychainchain. Some say it is a current caricaturecaricature logosof bandsof a dead movement while others say i

Punk Style and Society

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Dress products presenting punk imagery have become commercialized and widely distributed, although that does not necessarily strip them of all punk value. The design symbolism in punk style is affected by culture, consumptionfashionfashion consumption, and diffusionproduct diffusionproduct diffusion. Judy Attfield (2000) clarifies that the entirety of an object is more than its tactile and visible features, and also more than the social themes and ideas represented in the look of its design. The

Punk Style Motivations and Explanations

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is no simple way to answer the question “why does someone dress in a punk style?” Motivations cannot be entirely quantified, however there are dominant themes that drive many to make stylistic choices toward a punk look. Punk style is a way to express individual identity, as it addresses internal emotions as well as lifestyle choices and position within society. The individual choosing punk dress may be expressing internal feelings as well as trying to find external recognition for his or h

Introduction

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vintagerecyclingconsumerculture/societySubcultures have long played a significant role in the development logosof bandsof popular visual signifiers, which are often the catalyst for mainstream styles. self-identified punkPunk is one of the most influential and highly visible of modern subcultures, alongside other formerly underground scenes such as hip-hop, gothgoth, and electronic dance music. Many elements of punk dress have become iconic in popular culture, and yet some of their implications h

Summary of Punk Style

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Original punk looks were solidified in the eyes of outsiders and the media, and became cues for insiders and for following generations. However, the look is not as much of a uniform as observers would come to stereotype. While punk style has simultaneously maintained some of its original subcultural intent, it has also developed mass appeal, perhaps in an adulterated or appropriated form. This mass image then cyclically helps solidify the stereotypical vision of punk style including such images a

The Design Sketch: A History of Style

Linda Tain

Source: Portfolio Presentation for Fashion Designers. Fourth Edition, 4th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As women began to be assimilated into the male-dominated workplace, the need arose for a more tailored and functional working wardrobe. Enter the streamlined hourglass silhouette with leg-o’-mutton sleeve, giving new emphasis to the shoulder line. Multiple petticoats replaced the crinoline and bustle, whereas the corseted bodice remained. The Gibson, Charles DanaGibson Girl look for evening, complete with poufed hair knotted on top, was even more detail oriented than its daytime counterpart, aide

“All of Me”: Billie Holiday

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Music is our witness, and our ally. The beat is the confession which recognises changes and conquers time. Then, history becomes a garment we can wear and share, and not a cloak in which to hide; and time becomes a friend.

Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

The Black Prince of Elegance

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Eternelle superiorité du Dandy.

Superman: Codifying the Superhero Wardrobe

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superman’s othernessotherness is firmly established in a costume that is identical from day to day. Wearing only one costume, Superman reduces his core values to a single, consistent message which is not compromised by daily adjustments to his wardrobe. This kind of “distinctive persistent dress,” finds Gregory Stone (1981, p. 144), is more commonly associated with professional responsibilities than with personal identity, and so through consistency of dress, Superman presents himself as acting i

John Galliano, Spring/Summer 1990

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The unexpected success of John Galliano’s graduate collection for Saint Martin’s School of Art in 1984 led to an account with the London department store Browns and opportunities for financial backing. Galliano immersed himself in the creative process, with little concern for business matters. In 1987 he was announced as British Designer of the Year; he would receive the award again in 1994, 1995, and 1997. Galliano had been active in the London club scene during his time at Saint Martin’s. This

Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

Adam Ant

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In the early 1980s, pop musicians embraced historicism in their performance attire. Adam and the Ants, a new wave band based in London, donned clothing inspired by historic military outfits, nineteenth-century dandies, and pirates. They were among the recognized leaders of the New Romantics movement, a London youth subculture known for its taste for eccentric fashion. The band was formed in 1977 and achieved fame with a streak of successful albums, particularly Kings of the Wild Frontier (1980) a

Seeing in the dark—sunglasses and “outsider” cool (1940s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Many of the most evocative images show sunglasses worn in the dark, indoors, possibly because in these images we are forced to acknowledge their more oblique functions. Layers of darkness and blackness are compounded by dark frames with dark lenses in many of these images; think of Miles Davis in a murky club, in a dark suit, what light there is just highlighting the sheen of his skin against the intense glossy blackness of his shades.

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