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Introduction

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vintagerecyclingconsumerculture/societySubcultures have long played a significant role in the development logosof bandsof popular visual signifiers, which are often the catalyst for mainstream styles. self-identified punkPunk is one of the most influential and highly visible of modern subcultures, alongside other formerly underground scenes such as hip-hop, gothgoth, and electronic dance music. Many elements of punk dress have become iconic in popular culture, and yet some of their implications h

Ups and Downs of Paris Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Nous sortions d’une époque de guerre, d’uniformes, de femmessoldats aux carrures de boxeurs. Je dessinai des femmes-fleurs, épaules douces, bustes épanouis, tailles fines comme lianes et jupes larges comme corolles.ChristianDior, Christian Dior et moi (Paris: Amiot-Domont, 1956), p. 35. Translation in text by Valerie Steele.

Red or Dead

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Politics and Protests on the Catwalk

Else Skjold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

There is no better place from which to voice a critique of fashion than on the catwalk itself. Particularly since the mid-nineteenth century, and more intensely throughout the twentieth century, single individuals and groupings in Western society have challenged dominating standards and conventions of fashion through what they wear and create. But most of this critique has taken place outside the catwalk, in the shape of antifashion movements. However, from the 1970s and onward, there has been a

Teen Fashion: Youth and Identity in Popular Teen Dramas

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Both Gossip Girl and The O.C. share similar thematic and narrative terrain. Each explores topics typically covered in teen dramas (friendship, alienation, family, sex and sexuality, drug and alcohol use, etc.) and is preoccupied with the anxieties regarding one’s position within social hierarchies. These anxieties are magnified insofar as they are shored up by an exploration of class relations; both shows are ‘fish-out-of-water’ narratives. The O.C. charts main character Ryan Attwood’s (Benjamin

Fun With Pins and Rope: How Caroline Baker Styled the 1970s

Alice Beard

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

A double-page photographic spread from Nova magazine picturing a host of fashion editors arriving at the 1969 autumn/winter Paris collections suggests an interest in fashion’s ‘backstage’ that perhaps pre-empts today’s mood of fascination, where stylists are held up as celebrities and fashion editors are the subjects of feature films (see Figure 2.1). The recognisable names are there—among them, Diana Vreeland (American Vogue), Ernestine Carter (Sunday Times) and a young Grace Coddington (British

Lesbian Style: From Mannish Women to Lipstick Dykes

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Of course, there’s a strict gay dress code no matter where you cruise. At the height of my college cruising, I was attending Take Back the Night meetings dressed in Mr Greenjeans overall, Birkenstocks, and a bowl haircut that made me look like I’d just been released from a bad foster home. There is nothing more pitiful to look at than a closeted femme.

Introduction: Islamic Fashion and Anti-fashion: New Perspectives from Europe and North America

Annelies Moors and Emma Tarlo

Source: Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion. New Perspectives from Europe and North America, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

What does dress have to do with religion? Conventionally, religion has been studied in terms of doctrine and institutions and more recently, especially in the case of Islam, as a sociopolitical movement and threat to secularism. With a focus on Islamic fashion, and the everyday corporeal practices of young Muslim women, the starting point of this book is different. We argue that to better understand the importance of dress to religion, we need to go beyond the modernist concept of religion, groun

Guerrilla Media: Towards A Media Theory Of Fashion

Friedrich Weltzien

Source: Fashion Media. Past and Present, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

If you are not busy being born you are busy buying.

Subcultural Body Style

Therèsa M. Winge

Source: Body Style, 2012, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

While it may seem contrary to the individualistic nature of subcultures, these groups have style guidelines expected by members. Subcultural groups subtly and visually communicate acceptable dress and styles to current and future members, as well as to outsiders and posers (i.e., individuals who purposefully mimic subcultural dress). Accordingly, Ted Polhemus and Lynn Proctor (1978) state: The dress code of a social group prescribes limits, not absolute uniformity. To suggest that social identity

Antifashion

Susan B. Kaiser and Ryan Looysen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Antifashion has variously been used to describe everything from countercultural and subcultural styles to traditional or classic forms of dress. Its use has implied an assumption that it is possible to be outside of fashion, but a workable definition suggested by Elizabeth Wilson is “oppositional dress,” that is, dress that opposes mainstream fashion. An example of antifashion is the zoot suit, which, in the late 1930s and early 1940s, became a popular fashion for many African American jazz music

Fashion Variations

Susan Kaiser and Ryan Looysen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

For the last fifty years or so, a central debate in fashion studies has centered around the influence of minority, subcultural, and street styles on high and mainstream fashion. Are these styles outside the realm of fashion? Or is fashion a process of complex negotiation that includes such styles, providing fashion variations for different groups? Among the names assigned to these styles are antifashion, oppositional style, and alternative style. However, these terms all require an opposite again

Tradition and Fashion

Elizabeth D. Lowe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

One might think that because Canada and the United States are countries that can be considered technologically advanced and would be characterized as thoroughly modern societies, the role of fashion in the lives of these countries’ residents would be strong and the place of tradition would be minimal. But to understand where and how tradition and fashion contrast, complement, and intersect in these modern Western societies, it is necessary to begin by exploring the meaning of these concepts.

Antifashion in East Asian Dress: Power of Uniforms

Brian J. McVeigh

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion in East Asia reveals historical trajectories following the same path as Euro–American modernities. Modernization underpins the fashion-oriented consumerism visible today in Japan, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, accounting for the interplay between fashion, counter-fashion, and antifashion. Counter-fashion is concerned with an interest in change and avant-garde styles. It may be associated with dissent, protest, or ridicule. Antifashion (commonly confused with counter-fashion) means styles

Interpreting “Civilization” through Dress

Sandra Niessen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Accepted wisdom holds that dress traditions reflect the full range of environmental factors—physical, cultural, and social—under which they are produced and worn. In this, West European dress is no different from any other clothing system found in the world. Historically, however, the dress of Western civilization has been accorded a special position that has only recently begun to be seriously questioned. At the same time, its primacy can scarcely be disputed, as it has been used as the model fo

Dress and Art: Western

Sandra L. Rosenbaum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Images of people wearing clothing create an obvious connection between dress and art. Because relatively few examples of historic garments survive, these images document the history of dress. Historically, those sitting for portraits chose their dress to project a specific image; the artist was responsible for conveying messages encoded in dress, meticulously reproducing them. Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass have commented that Renaissance clothes were perceived as material forms of pers

Style: The Endless Desire for a New Look

Annette Lynch and Mitchell D. Strauss

Source: Changing Fashion. A Critical Introduction to Trend Analysis and Meaning, 2007, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The new fashionable figure is growing straighter and straighter, less bust, less hips, more waist, a wonderfully long, slender suppleness about the limbs … The long skirt … reveals plainly every line and curve of the leg from hip to ankle. The petticoat is obsolete, prehistoric. How slim, how graceful, how elegant women look! The leg has suddenly become fashionable.

Background Reading

Samantha Holland

Source: Alternative Femininities. Body, Age and Identity, 2004, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Since the key overall theme of the research is femininity (how it is rendered, played out, resisted and understood), here I review ideas about and definitions of femininity and how these definitions do (or do not) link to the research. ‘What is femininity?’ is a question which has exercised feminist writers for decades and many feminist writers have attempted to pin down the elusive concept of femininity. For example, Brownmiller asserts that ‘femininity, in essence, is a romantic sentiment, a no

Categories of Unconventional

Samantha Holland

Source: Alternative Femininities. Body, Age and Identity, 2004, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I have always felt that I was different, you know. I never ever fitted into those patterns, the proper girl pattern … it’s like a paper pattern, I see it in my mind, there are particular lines you have to stay in, and you end up making just this very particular outfit … maybe there are three choices in the packet but they’re all dead similar

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