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Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

Extreme Hellene: Sport, Superheroes and the Modern Übermensch

Adam Geczy

Source: The Artificial Body in Fashion and Art. Marionettes, Models, and Mannequins, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Hellinism, HellenicKirschoff, BodoLagerfeld, KarlI am my own marionette

Sneakers as a Symbol of Manhood: Wearing Masculinity on Their Feet

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is a consensus among dress and fashion scholars that human footwear was not always gendered, but there are different accounts as to when footwear became gender-specific. The distinction between ladies’ shoemakers and men’s shoemakers in the eighteenth century clearly indicates that footwear was gendered.

Sneakers as Fashion: Reclaiming Masculine Adornment

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Fashion is considered as a complex social practicepractice in which challenges to reform male appearances are sometimes made by figures with the powerpower to expect obedience. Men have also used their appearance as a strategy of refusal or disinterest in the dominant culture that surrounds them. Others have been reformers who tried to convince the populace that their model of dress would lead to better social relationships. (McNeil 2009: 15)

Fashion, Whisky and ‘Muscular’ Neo-Royals

Tereza Kuldova

Source: Luxury Indian Fashion. A Social Critique, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The final chapter turns to the world of elite men and the balancing acts of masculinity that they perform in order to cultivate their image of power.The role played by the ‘rhetoric of muscularity’ is investigated, as is the threat of effeminacy, stemming among other things from their indulgence in luxury and consumption. In order to counteract this threat, men appropriate symbols of low class machismo and incorporate them in the elitist aesthetic, in a similar way in which they use ‘dirty’ subst

Culture and Consumer Behavior

Brenda Sternquist and Elizabeth B. Goldsmith

Source: International Retailing, 3rd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you should be able to:

Superman: Codifying the Superhero Wardrobe

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superman’s othernessotherness is firmly established in a costume that is identical from day to day. Wearing only one costume, Superman reduces his core values to a single, consistent message which is not compromised by daily adjustments to his wardrobe. This kind of “distinctive persistent dress,” finds Gregory Stone (1981, p. 144), is more commonly associated with professional responsibilities than with personal identity, and so through consistency of dress, Superman presents himself as acting i

Identity, role and the Mask

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The function of a costume or mask is to “disguisedisguise, protect or transform” (Wilsher, 2007, p. 12). For superheroes, the mask serves all three of these functions. It identity constructionreligiontransforms the wearer from ordinary civilian to superhero, disguising him in order to protect the identity of his alter ego, and those he cares about. The duality of the superhero’s identity is bound up in his costume. His public face, the mask, conceals his private face, hidden underneath.

Evolution and Adaptation: Form versus function

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Superheroes are immediately identified as extraordinary by their costumes. These costumes are, in contrast to the civilian clothing of their alter ego, colorful, bold, figure-hugging, and often seemingly impractical. At first glance, they may print (comics)accuracyappear ludicrous, but their origins reveal aspects of these costumes to be both necessary and plausible.

Wearing the flag: Patriotism and Globalization

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Captain AmericaCaptain America was created as a defender of the values of the United States of America. His appearance resembles those of Olympians, for whom national allegiance becomes the defining factor in the design of their uniforms. When they inject Steve Rogers with a serum to give him super-powers, the American secret service intend that his supernatural athleticismathleticism will be used in combat, on behalf of the US Army. He is dressed in a flag-like costume, and introduced to the wor

Dressing up, dressing down: A spectacle of otherness, and the ordinariness of the civilian alter-ego

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

™ and © DC Comics

Channeling the Beast

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

physiognomyImages depicting animals with human characteristics, and hybrid animal-human beasts, were a staple of ancient religion and mythology. Sometimes, they were deities, like Bastet, the feline goddess of Ancient Egypt, and at other times they were the monstrous product of animal/human coupling, like ancient Crete’s Minotaur. These historical animal-human hybrids had a special power and allure. The duality of this fusion of “human and the non-human” can be frightening, or at least unsettling

Superhero cosplay

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

re-enactmentThe notion of a fan has moved beyond “older ideas of media spectatorship” that involve little more than direct consumption of a cultural artifact (Flemming, 2007, p. 16). participatory fandomParticipatory fandom involves tangential activities which expand upon the fictional world and blur boundaries with reality. “Fans create a fan culture with its own systems of production and distribution that forms . . . a ‘shadow cultural economy’ that lies outside that of the cultural industries

Real-life superheroes

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The appropriation of the superhero costume often comes in conjunction with the performance of a superhero lifestyle. Masked vigilantes patrol the streets of cities including Seattle, Atlanta, New York, Toronto, MexicoMexico City, and London, and congregate in cyberspace via the World Superhero RegistryWorld Superhero Registry. Though they are too numerous to list here, those real-life superheroes that have been the subject of academic study include Phoenix Jones, PhoenixJones, who patrols the str

Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Iron Man

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

upgradestechnologyinsigniacivilian alter egoidentity constructionOnce a costume is established as a representation of a certain set of values and abilities, the superhero identity can become more attached to the costume than to its wearer. In the case of Iron Man, identityidentity is more bound up in the costume than with any other superhero. Indeed, Iron Man is not a man, but an augmentation.

The X-Men

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

identitycustomizationconformitycolorReynolds (1992, p. 26) observes that all superhero costumes function “as a uniform, binding together all super-beings.” The superhero uniformuniform asserts his readiness to perform acts of heroism, and aligns him with crime-fighting values. Costume “creates a community between its wearers” (ibid.), communicating to audiences that even the most isolated or rebellious superhero conforms to a core set of ideals that define the superhero genre. More so than other

Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Men in Skirts

Fruzsina Bekefi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The male skirt has evolved throughout fashion history. From a traditional form of dress worn in Ancient Greece and Rome, non-bifurcated garments worn by men came to be perceived as a challenge to conventional gender norms in the West. Designers such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Vivienne Westwood have used male skirts to interpret masculinity through their designs in the latter half of the twentieth century. In the early twenty-first century, male skirts are gaining traction again.

Victor Victoria

Katy Conover

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Dirk Bikkembergs

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Aesthetics of The Jazz Dandy

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Adding to his narrative, Michel Fontanes, a former executive, author and jazz musician, articulated the French impression of African American male instrumentalists that expatriated to the country. “They were considered in France as Gods. All black musicians not the white musicians.” Regarding his trip to Paris in 1949, Miles Davis offered consensus. “It was the freedom of being in France and being treated like a human being, like someone important. Even the band and the music we played sounded be

Reel to Real Life: Re-Fashioning India from Bollywood to Street

Arti Sandhu

Source: Indian Fashion. Tradition, Innovation, Style, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Cinema in India is an extremely influential cultural medium. India has the world’s largest film industry with over 1,000 films produced every year in more than 20 languagesIbid. and over 14 million Indians go to the movies on a daily basis.In 2008 the industry was valued at approximately US$2.2 billion, and expected to grow by 9 percent p.a. till 2015 (Deloitte 2011 report: “Media & Entertainment in India Digital Road Ahead.” www.deloitte.com/in [accessed June 4, 2013]) Many more watch them at ho

Coco Chanel

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Teen Fashion: Youth and Identity in Popular Teen Dramas

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Both Gossip Girl and The O.C. share similar thematic and narrative terrain. Each explores topics typically covered in teen dramas (friendship, alienation, family, sex and sexuality, drug and alcohol use, etc.) and is preoccupied with the anxieties regarding one’s position within social hierarchies. These anxieties are magnified insofar as they are shored up by an exploration of class relations; both shows are ‘fish-out-of-water’ narratives. The O.C. charts main character Ryan Attwood’s (Benjamin

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