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Wearers and Wardrobes

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Wardrobe(s)Wardrobe(s)wardrobe studiesThe fashion fashionsystemsystem is realized in the creation of the fashion items, and in their diffusion to the public through mediamedia images. However, a fashion system does not exist without fashion leaders and followers. If there are no wearers, then there is no fashion. This chapter investigates kimono wearing practice through a wardrobe survey of kimono wearerskimono wearers, discussion of kimono group(s)groups, and also through interviews with kimono

Returning Kimono to the Streets

Sheila Cliffe

Source: The Social Life of Kimono. Japanese Fashion Past and Present, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The hegemonyhegemony that continues to state either directly or indirectly that fashion is a product of European society is facing increasing challenges, and we appear to be in the midst of a paradigm shift. The story of the kimono can be considered one of these challenges. Clothing history in Japan shows an obsession with selfself-presentation going way back to early historical records. While accomplishment in all the arts was desirable for the HeianHeian Edoperiodperiod woman, the most importan

Introduction

Adam Geczy

Source: The Artificial Body in Fashion and Art. Marionettes, Models, and Mannequins, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

PlutarchHegel, Georg, Wilhelm FriedrichZizek, SlavojIt is not difficult to credit that statues may have appeared to ooze with sweat, shed tears, or exude something which resembles drops of blood, since wood and stone often gather a mould which produces moisture, and not only display various colours themselves, but take on other tints from the atmosphere, and there is nothing to prevent us from believing that heaven sometimes employs such portents to foreshadow the future. It is also possible that

Sneakers as a Symbol of Manhood: Wearing Masculinity on Their Feet

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Sneakers. Fashion, Gender, and Subculture, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is a consensus among dress and fashion scholars that human footwear was not always gendered, but there are different accounts as to when footwear became gender-specific. The distinction between ladies’ shoemakers and men’s shoemakers in the eighteenth century clearly indicates that footwear was gendered.

Gender and Trends—On Variability

Jenny Lantz

Source: The Trendmakers. Behind the Scenes of the Global Fashion Industry, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Men always look a bit silly in a trend, don’t they?

Introduction

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vintagerecyclingconsumerculture/societySubcultures have long played a significant role in the development logosof bandsof popular visual signifiers, which are often the catalyst for mainstream styles. self-identified punkPunk is one of the most influential and highly visible of modern subcultures, alongside other formerly underground scenes such as hip-hop, gothgoth, and electronic dance music. Many elements of punk dress have become iconic in popular culture, and yet some of their implications h

Punk Style Motivations and Explanations

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There is no simple way to answer the question “why does someone dress in a punk style?” Motivations cannot be entirely quantified, however there are dominant themes that drive many to make stylistic choices toward a punk look. Punk style is a way to express individual identity, as it addresses internal emotions as well as lifestyle choices and position within society. The individual choosing punk dress may be expressing internal feelings as well as trying to find external recognition for his or h

Summary of Punk Style

Monica Sklar

Source: Punk Style, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Original punk looks were solidified in the eyes of outsiders and the media, and became cues for insiders and for following generations. However, the look is not as much of a uniform as observers would come to stereotype. While punk style has simultaneously maintained some of its original subcultural intent, it has also developed mass appeal, perhaps in an adulterated or appropriated form. This mass image then cyclically helps solidify the stereotypical vision of punk style including such images a

The Movement of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: The Dynamics of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

We have likened the movement of fashion to the movement of a river. As dress historian James Laver, James,Laver said, in comparing the fashion cycle to a force of nature, “Nothing seems to be able to turn it back until it has spent itself, until it has provoked a reaction by its very excess.”JamesLaver, Taste and Fashion, rev. ed. (London: George G. Harrop, 1946), p. 52. However, just as a river can swell to turbulent flood stage or be slowed or diverted by a dam, so the movement of fashion can b

Introduction

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

I once asked my father if it became compulsory for all men to wear flared trousers, what would he do? He replied, “Go in the nuddy [nude]”. I laughed at his response, thinking he was just old fashioned. I must have been about eleven or twelve and my idea of a well-dressed man came in the form of Jimi Hendrix who reigned supreme in such pants. This was the period of revolutionary dress for the young.

“We Also Should Walk in the Newness of Life”: Individualized Harlem Style of the 1930s

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

With the visual arts of the 1920s and 1930s anchored by black peoples, we can recollect and reimagine this twentieth-century moment when Harlem was not only “in vogue”, or “on the minds” of a complacent few, but also a geo-political metaphor for modernity and an icon for an increasingly complex black diasporal presence in the world.

“My Man, Let Me Pull Your Coat to Something”: Malcolm X

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

[P]eople are always speculating—why am I as I am? To understand that of any person, his whole life, from birth must be reviewed. All of our experiences fuse into our personality. Everything that ever happened to us is an ingredient.

Coda

Carol Tulloch

Source: The Birth of Cool. Style Narratives of the African Diaspora, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Being Fashionable in the Globalization Era in India: Holy Writing on Garments

Janaki Turaga

Source: Modern Fashion Traditions. Negotiating Tradition and Modernity through Fashion, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Using a case study of ‘holy fashion’ in India, Janaki Turaga explores why this has become so popular in a nation that is grappling with rapid modernization and globalization amid the retention of the traditions and heritage of ancient India. Indicatively, fashion-conscious Indians have embraced a diverse range of ‘secularised sacred’ fashion garments that were previously reserved for believers in culturally prescribed sacred contexts in order to demonstrate fashion and lifestyle statements. Garme

Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Mannequins and Mannequin Alternatives

Judy Bell and Kate Ternus

Source: Silent Selling. Best Practices and Effective Strategies in Visual Merchandising, 5th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The mannequin is regarded as one of the fashion retailer’s most powerful communication tools. Used strategically, it speaks volumes about fashion trends and a store’s brand identity. We know that in order to communicate effectively, a store mannequin must relate to a shopper’s self-image. When shoppers follow current fashion—read about it, talk about it, look at it, buy it, and wear it—they are defining self and describing who they are through the clothing they wear. In fact, more than one indust

Dress and Body Image

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

As you learned in Chapter 6, “Dress and Physical Appearance,” the body is a very important vehicle in the public presentation of oneself to others. We make assessments of others on the basis of body characteristics and configurations, we categorize others (often unknowingly) based on their body size, color, attractiveness, or other physical features, and we often make evaluations and judgments about their worth (real or imagined) once we have assessed and categorized them. The previous chapter we

Dress and Personality

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 1, “Why Study Dress?” we noted that why you look the way you do and the choices that you make to dress your body and thereby modify your appearance is a result of three major influences: the culture and environment that you are living in, the social groups that you participate in, and the combination of individual characteristics that make you a unique individual. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on an individual characteristic, the psychological concept of personality, and how

Dress and the Self

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How do you think about yourself on an individual basis? You may have ideas about yourself as a physical being. For example, you may like your weight but not your skin. You may love your hair but not your nails. You may also have ideas about yourself as a dressed being. How do you look in jeans? In a uniform? With your hair colored? You may also have ideas about your inner personality.Relationships between dress and personality as discussed in Chapter 8. What type of person am I? What do you belie

Dress and Identity

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 9, “Dress and the Self “ we said that the self is a dynamic interactive system of beliefs, feelings, and motives that characterize you as an individual. But because humans are complex, our selves are multi-dimensional. In the mornings you attend classes (i.e., you are a student), on weekends you play basketball with other members of your team (i.e., you are an athlete). To acknowledge this diversity, we say that the self is composed of several identities. It is important to understand

Dress and Socialization

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Key to the understanding of a society is the concept of social position. You will recall from Chapter 10, “Dress and Identity,” that every society, regardless of its size, is comprised of a set of social positions. For example, typically there are individuals who formally or informally lead the members of the society (e.g., Presidents, chiefs, executives) and those who follow (e.g., citizens, members, employees). This example has two simple social positions: Leader and follower.

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

Military Dress as an Ideological Marker in Roman Palestine

Guy D. Stiebel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Only a few instances from the Roman Empire actually provide scholars with near-complete assemblages of panoplies, and most rare of all are the remains that derived directly from conflict lands. In addition to the celebrated navy soldier from ce79 Herculaneum,R. Gore, “2000 Years of Silence: The Dead Do Tell Tales at Vesuvius,” National Geographic, 165 (1984), pp. 557–613; S. Ortisi “Pompeji und Herculaneum—Soldaten in den Vesuvsdäten,” Archäologie der Schlachtfelder—Militaria aus Zerstörungshoriz

The Movement of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Fashion is, in many ways, like a river. A river is always in motion, continuously flowing—sometimes it is slow and gentle; other times it is rushed and turbulent. It is exciting and never the same. It affects those who ride its currents and those who rest on its shores. Its movements depend on the environment.

Identity, role and the Mask

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The function of a costume or mask is to “disguisedisguise, protect or transform” (Wilsher, 2007, p. 12). For superheroes, the mask serves all three of these functions. It identity constructionreligiontransforms the wearer from ordinary civilian to superhero, disguising him in order to protect the identity of his alter ego, and those he cares about. The duality of the superhero’s identity is bound up in his costume. His public face, the mask, conceals his private face, hidden underneath.

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