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Styling for the Entertainment Industry

Shannon Burns-Tran and Jenny B. Davis

Source: Style Wise. A Practical Guide to Becoming a Fashion Stylist, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter you will learn:

The Theater of Fashion

Valerie Steele

Source: Paris Fashion. A Cultural History, 3rd Edition, 2017, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Nous savons donc beaucoup de gré à mademoiselle Nathalie des sacrifices qu’elle fait pour ses costumes; de beaux habits sur de jolies femmes, rien n’est plus charmant.

Dress and the Arts

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Fashion Styling, Photography, and Costume Design

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A retailer, manufacturer, designer, or organization may contract an independent firm, the fashion show and event planning company, to do all or part of this work for a fee. In general, the fashion show and event producer manages fashion shows and special events for its clients. The company works with each client to determine the type of event, intended purpose, designated audience, and the budget. The company may be contracted to handle part or all of the advertising and public relations, which c

Beauty, Spa, and Wellness

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Sephora was founded in 1970 in France by Dominique Mandonnaud, who, in 1993, fashioned the store’s unique name by blending the Biblical name of Zipporah (Moses’ exceptionally beautiful wife) with the ancient Greek term for “pretty,” sephos. Today, Sephora is the leading chain of perfume and cosmetics stores in France and a powerful beauty retailer around the world. Sephora operates approximately 1,300 stores in 27 countries worldwide, with an expanding base of more than 300 stores across North Am

Specialized Portfolios: Diverse Market Segments

Joanne Ciresi Barrett

Source: Designing Your Fashion Portfolio. From Concept to Presentation, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

What makes a portfolio specialized? Reference the specializations listed in Chapter 4 for consideration. Chapter 5 presents the details of research and execution needed to make your specialized portfolio feature practical, applied, functional details to suit the client’s needs for several categories: accessories, activewear, bridal, costume, eco/green apparel, intimate apparel, millinery, swimwear, T-shirts, technical design, and urban streetwear.

1690–1815: Chinoiserie, Indiennerie, Turquerie and Egyptomania

Adam Geczy

Source: Fashion and Orientalism. Dress, Textiles and Culture from the 17th to the 21st Century, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

See, mademoiselle, how that goes well with your Chinese-style hairstyle, your mantle of peacock feathers, your petticoat of celadon and gold, your cinnamon bottoms and your shoes of jade…

Drag: Of Kings and Queens

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The stylistic ideal of the drag queen, is screaming vulgarity, the overstated look of the balloon-breasted tramp in the leopard-skin micro-mini skirt who strives to be loud, tawdry and cheap… unlike the lone fetishist who in an effort to ‘pass’, squeezes into corsets and tapes his breasts together to create the illusion of cleavage.Harris, The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture, 204.

Overview of Mongolia

Monisha Ahmed

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Walking down the main street in Ulan Bator, Mongolia’s capital, past gray, crumbling Soviet-era buildings, a woman wearing a blue silk del, or robe, contrasts with the robust man by her side in a sober, gray Western-style suit. Walking alongside them are women in skinny jeans, fitted T-shirts, and stiletto heels. But far from the city, a nomad wears his sheepskin robe, sitting astride his horse. Mongolia has many faces. Probably the most celebrated of these is Chinggis Khaan, better known by his

Russian Constructivism in Dress and Textiles

Djurdja Bartlett

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Europe, Russia, and the Caucasus, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Constructivism was embedded in immense political and social changes brought about by the Bolshevik Revolution. Its appearance in 1919 resulted from the merger of two parallel but very different artistic movements: futurism and proletkult. While futurism rebelled against bourgeois culture and lifestyle in a series of anarchistic practices, proletkult was a politically motivated mass movement that promoted a separate culture for the proletariat. In this context, for the constructivists, fashion was

Performance Dress in Japan

Monica Bethe

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In early-twenty-first-century Japan, theater and dance performances range from the avant-garde to traditional performing arts that trace their beginnings to periods spanning over a thousand years. The costumes worn for these traditional performances reflect styles of dress prevalent at various historical periods, though not necessarily the period corresponding to the inception of the art in question. The story of performance costume must therefore be seen against the background of the history of

Costume Designer

Whitney Blausen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

An article in the New Idea Women’s Magazine says that by 1906 theatrical costume design firms flourished in most major cities. Some, like Eaves or Van Horn’s, in New York and Philadelphia respectively, began as manufacturers of uniforms or regalia and expanded into the theatrical market. By contrast, Mrs. Caroline Siedle and Mrs. Castel-Bert, both in New York, established their ateliers specifically to cater to the growing theater industry.

Theatrical Costume

Whitney Blausen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

When theater reemerged, it did so, ironically, in the context of the church. The Christian church was the sworn enemy of the drama (perceiving it to be both immodest and akin to devil-worshiping). But, since services were performed in Latin, which fewer and fewer parishioners could understand, priests had to devise a way to dramatize the liturgy.

Performance Dress in China and Taiwan

Alexandra B. Bonds, Dongshin Chang and Elizabeth Johnson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Over three hundred forms of indigenous theater entertainment incorporating song and music have evolved in China, with different forms of music-dramas being performed in specific regions throughout the country. Among these forms, Kunqu (songs of Kunshan) took shape in the Lower Yangtze region of China in the mid-sixteenth century, attained national popularity in the following two centuries, and is still thriving in the early twenty-first century. Jingju (capital drama), commonly known in the West

Dress as Costume in the Theater and Performing Arts

Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In costume, individuals become characters of plays. Dressing for the performing arts works the same way. The performing arts include theater, dance, opera, films, television, and the circus. Costumes are made up of supplements to the body such as gowns and wigs, also including body modifications like makeup. Stylized Japanese Noh masks completely transform actors and constitute artwork in themselves. Throughout most of the history of theater, actors had to supply their own makeup and costumes, bu

Beaton, Cecil

Nancy Hall-Duncan

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The most important influence on Beaton’s fashion photography was his interest in stage design and theatrical production, in which he was extremely accomplished. He did costume design for the film Gigi and set and costume design for the play and the film My Fair Lady, receiving Oscars for both. He also designed for the Metropolitan Opera, the Comédie Française, the Royal Ballet (London), and the American Ballet Theatre. “Completely stage struck” at an early age, he wrote in his Photobiography that

Barbier, Georges*

Michele Majer

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In Michael Arlen’s best-selling 1924 novel, The Green Hat, the heroine Iris March is compared to a figure in a Barbier fashion illustration: “She stood carelessly like the women in Georges Barbier’s almanacs, Falbalas et Fanfreluches, who know how to stand carelessly. Her hands were thrust into the pockets of a light brown leather jacket—pour le sport” (Steele, p. 247). The casual elegance ascribed to Arlen’s character, a quintessential element of the 1920s fashion ideal, epitomizes Barbier’s fig

Theatrical Makeup

Elizabeth McLafferty

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Makeup Artists

Elizabeth McLafferty

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Cross-Dressing in South Asia

Alka Pande

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. South Asia and Southeast Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Cross-dressing is the act of wearing clothing associated with another gender within a society, although a person who cross-dresses does not always identify as having a gender different from that assigned at birth. The androgyny of ancient Indian gods and goddesses implies the merging of the male and female principle. Brahma, the Hindu creator god, first created images of Prajapati, a male creator having a womb. He lacked the power to create women until Siva appeared before him in an androgynous f

The Actress: Covent Garden and the Strand 1880–1914

Christopher Breward

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In 1908 the Edwardian journalist Edwin Pugh clearly recognized the productive contingency of the Strand's very particular but rapidly changing environment of play and display when he noted its ‘tall pinched … and squat dumpy buildings, brick and red and grey granite and stucco’, a stone ‘coping adorned with a fresco of classical figures in bas relief, advertising some up-to-date brand of physical culture – plate glass windows, expansive and boldly glittering, and windows such as one associates wi

Masculine Apparel

Stephen Orgel

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

it was not lawful for women to swear by Hercules, nor to enter into his temple: this was a punishment laid upon that sex, for the insolency of Queen Omphale over Hercules, in causing him so effeminately to serve her.AlexanderRoss, Mystagogus Poeticus, or the Muses Interpreter (London, 1648), pp. 169–70.

Paul Poiret's Minaret Style: Originality, Reproduction, and Art in Fashion

Nancy J. Troy

Source: Classic and Modern Writings on Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2009, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

During his visit to America, Mr. Poiret was much astonished to see advertised in various shop windows Poiret gowns which he himself had never seen before. Needless to say, Mr. Poiret quickly identified these gowns as never having emanated from his establishment and the labels which were sewed in them as nothing but counterfeits of his original label. He immediately placed the matter in the hands of his attorney, who started an investigation which revealed the fact that not only were Poiret labels

Fashionable Hair in the Eighteenth Century: Theatricality and Display

Louisa Cross

Source: Hair. Styling, Culture and Fashion, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

In the eighteenth century, it was not enough just to be seen to be conspicuously in fashion, it was important to be seen to be fashionable in spectacular style. Changing or accessorizing hairstyles was a more economical way of keeping in the fashion than buying material to make up new items of clothing. For women, this brought about great fluctuation in the heights and variety of hair dressing and its display. There were some high styles at the beginning of the century such as the ‘fontange’ wher

The Theatrical Shoe: The Utterance of Shoemaking: Cobblers on the Israeli Stage

Dorit Yerushalmi

Source: Jews and Shoes, 2008, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Seen within the context of Hebrew drama in prestate Palestine, and in light of his own life story, I consider Sammy (Samuel) Gronemann (1875–1952) as a “cultural cobbler.” At the center of his play stands the “little guy” with all his flaws and aspirations, the flip side of the native Hebrew plays of the 1940s, which focused on national and land myths and often placed the Land of Israel as the hero of the drama, with plots demonstrating how to conquer the wilderness, drain the swampland, and make

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