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Conducting Research on Dress

Sharron J. Lennon, Kim P. Johnson and Nancy A. Rudd

Source: Social Psychology of Dress, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Dressing the body is an important phenomenon to study. So how do we learn about this behavior? We all dress our bodies, so we all know something about the process from our first-hand experiences. However, when approaching any topic in a scholarly manner, it is important to gather facts, determine relationships, and offer explanations via an active, thorough, and systematic process. The name of such a process is called research. Conducting research involves the formulation of questions, the gather

Research

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

There is no point in trying to be fashionable. This book cannot tell you how to design fashion; it can only tell you what the ingredients are, ways to put them together, and many of the important things that you will need to consider when designing clothes. Clothing is only “fashionable” when your peers or the industry deem a design to be of the zeitgeist. It either is or it isn’t.

What is a collection?

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Any successful or financially viable collection requires an enormous amount of research, investigation, and planning. Successful designers, manufacturers, and retailers have a clear understanding of their customers’ needs, as well as an understanding of their position in a highly competitive market. In addition to the creation and realization of any collection, designers need to consider a range of issues if the final garments are to hang in customers’ closets.

The student collection

Elinor Renfrew and Colin Renfrew

Source: Developing a Fashion Collection, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This may be referred to as the final brief, proposal, statement of intent, or concept outline. Regardless of its name, the activity and process is the same. Begin by asking yourself what will showcase your skills and creativity in the best way. Some students approach this stage of their final collection with vague or unrealistic ideas, being driven to making the ultimate personal catwalk statement. Without reflection, research, and a great deal of hard work, this will not work. Creativity in fash

Retail Research Directions in Today’s Retail Environment

Jay Diamond, Ellen Diamond and Sheri Litt

Source: Fashion Retailing. A multi-channel approach, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Retailers must make a variety of decisions concerning store location, merchandising, advertising and promotion, customer services, human resources, sales methods, and competition. They must study each area so that they will be able to function in the most profitable manner. The following sections list the types of questions retailers should consider about these areas; some of them relate exclusively to brick-and-mortar establishments and others relate more to off-site or on-site ventures.

Dress Thinking: Disciplines and Indisciplinarity

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

This chapter will consider some of the pioneering works in the field of dress history. Although these works predate any notion of interdisciplinarity, I believe they achieve an enviable ‘indisciplinarity’, a condition that offers an alternative to the contemporary disciplinary side-taking threatening to cannibalize our field. Before proceeding any further, however, it should be made clear that this chapter is in no way intended to be some sort of polemic against the current state of dress studies

Comparing Designers

Tony Glenville

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Conclusion

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The main aim of this research has been to analyse Moroccan fashion as a materialization of social, cultural, political, economic and religious developments in Moroccan society, because until now Moroccan fashion has been predominantly studied as physical objects in which the materials and construction of the garments have been given primacy over their social and cultural meanings. Simultaneously, this research has aimed to contest prevailing misconceptions concerning traditional dress as being st

Introduction

M. Angela Jansen

Source: Moroccan Fashion. Design, tradition and modernity, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is only in the past fifteen years that ‘fashion of traditional dress’ gained the attention of social scientists, simply because it was considered a contradictio in terminis. It was probably John Flügel (1950 [1930]: 129–30) who set the trend in the 1930s by introducing his dichotomy ‘fixed’ versus ‘modish’ costume, whereby ‘fixed costume changes slowly in time, and its whole value depends, to some extent, upon its permanence’. Modish costume, on the other hand, he explains, ‘changes very rapid

Fashion and Anthropology

Brent Luvaas

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Anthropologists have largely shied away from the study of fashion, preferring to focus their attention to dress on those everyday items that define an individual as part of an enduring cultural tradition. Only in the last two decades, as anthropologists have shifted their attention to global processes, have they begun to look at fashion specifically as a site of critical enquiry. As they do so, they bring with them a disciplinary attention to the messy and contradictory lived experiences that mak

Introduction: Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools

Charlotte Nicklas and Annebella Pollen

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Terminology is a perpetual difficulty in the study of dress history: how should ‘dress’, ‘fashion’, ‘clothing’ (or ‘clothes’) and ‘costume’ be defined and distinguished from each other? In current scholarship, how do ‘dress history’, ‘fashion history’ and ‘fashion studies’ differ? The meanings of these words and phrases overlap and interconnect, their definitions continuing to challenge researchers (Cumming 2004: 8, 15; Harte 2009: 176; Taylor 2013: 26). Joanne Eicher and Susan Kaiser both emphas

How Marketers Obtain and Use Consumer Information

Patricia Mink Rath, Stefani Bay, Richard Petrizzi and Penny Gill

Source: The Why Of The Buy. Consumer Behavior and Fashion Marketing, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Having studied the preceding chapters, you understand how complex consumer behavior is—and why marketers work hard to decipher those complexities so that they can best meet the needs and wants of their target customers. But how do they do that? In large part, they do it by collecting information from and about consumers through research.

Dots in Fashion

Jo Turney

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Spots, dots, spheres, circles, and even “splats” are central to the expression of fashion as fun. With reference to 1950s bobby-soxers and nostalgic soda fountains, child-like innocence, summer vacations, dance, and escapism in general, spotty fashion has, since the 1970s, embraced humor and playfulness. Yet, prior to this date, dots in fashion and in representation in general have negotiated a paradoxical relationship with taste, encompassing both the naive and the sophisticated, which has incre

Bibliographic guide

In response to the question of what is the social psychology of dress, one first needs to address two related questions: what is dress and what is social psychology? The term dress has been defined by dress scholars Mary Ellen Roach and Joanne Eicher (1992) as the total arrangement of outwardly detectable body modifications and all material objects added to it in the form of body supplements. Body modifications are transformations made directly to the body and include making changes of color (e.g, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

In academic literature, the words “sex” and “gender” have specific meanings that are interchangeable in popular usage. To the scholar, “sex” is used to denote biological categories (male, female); “gender” is used for distinctions in role, appearance, and behavior that are cultural in origin, but stemming from an individual’s sex (masculinity and femininity). In practice, these classifications are more complex; recent scholarship has begun to take into consideration the fact that biological sex i, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

A number of scholars have helped to develop the field of aesthetics of dress using a multidisciplinary approach. An early literature review was completed by dress scholars DeLong et al. (1974). Marilyn Horn (1975), also a dress scholar, approached the study of clothing as an interdisciplinary topic. Later, DeLong and Ann Marie Fiore (1994), seeking to provide a better understanding of aesthetics of dress, edited a compilation of papers that included a variety of perspectives. Fiore, Patricia Kiml, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Dress, along with cloth, textiles, and adornment, has been an important part of the study of material culture in anthropology since the early times of the discipline, when the focus was on cross-cultural variation and the relationships between different parts of culture and their changes. Some earlier studies aimed specifically to record the significance of material culture in the face of change in a manner that sometimes has been described as “salvage anthropology.” A later generation of anthrop, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Sources employed for the study of dress history include documents, visual representations, and material artifacts. Documents include all manner of written records such as wills, inventories, wardrobe accounts, bills of sale, advice on dressing, as well as eyewitness accounts of how people dressed in the past. An early example would be the Roman historian Tacitus, who described the dress of the inhabitants of central Europe in Germania in 98 C.E. The visual record includes paintings, drawings, eng, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

]Introductory texts on world religions are numerous and generally offer a selection of definitions—from the classic to more contemporary approaches that attempt to embrace all religions under a problematical single all-encompassing definition. In the study of religion, theoretical frameworks vary from the sociological, psychological, and anthropological to the neurophysiological; there are also those from studies in religion. Scholars of religion Willard G. Oxtoby and Alan F. Segal, in A Concise , Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

The word “media” is the plural form of “medium,” from the Latin, meaning “middle” or “middle layer.” Thus, a medium is much like a middleman, a conduit that serves to “lead” or “bring together.” In fashion, each medium functions to hold and deliver information: visual, textual, cultural., Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Research in sustainable fashion examines relevant issues from perspectives including theoretical, cultural, social, design-led, industry-based, educational, economic, and psychological. For reasons that might be purely serendipitous, but indicating much underlying research activity, 2008 was a significant year for scholarly publications on sustainable fashion. Comprehensive texts by two UK design-based academics, theorist Kate Fletcher (2008) and practitioner Sandy Black (2008), articulate and ad, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Fashion as a research topic has been marginal and never been popular or mainstream in the field of social sciences. It was a topic often taken up by philosophers and moral/social critics in the first half of the nineteenth century, such as René König. Fashion scholars such as Yuniya Kawamura, Gilles Lipovetsky, Sandra Niessen, Anne Brydon, and Elizabeth Wilson have pointed out the academic devaluation of the topic. But with a growing number of academic journals and publications on fashion and dre, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Trend forecasting looks into the shifts in cultural, economic, and technological contexts to predict how people will behave in the future in terms of their consumption patterns. Trend forecasting is especially vital for creative domains like fashion. Fashion is also one of the most visible media for trends as it reflects the change in the collective aesthetic through multiple mediums. The successful prediction of future fashion trends requires research across multiple industries and contexts. Int, Berg Fashion Library

Bibliographic guide

Western subcultural style uses the dressed body as a place of social critique and artistic expression that does not follow the conventions of mainstream style. Subcultural dress can also demonstrate lifestyle and community participation, as well as individual experiences that pertain to the subcultural interests. Scholarship on the dress practices of punk, goth, hip-hop, hippie, and other underground lifestyles has shown that subcultural dress can be a catalyst for change in the mainstream fashio, Berg Fashion Library

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