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Watchmen

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

practicalitycapeappropriationAlan Moore, AlanMoore and Dave Gibbons, DaveGibbons’ WatchmenWatchmen (1986–1987) is a deconstruction of the superhero comic that poses the question “what if superheroes [and their costumes] were real?” (Thompson, 2005, p. 105). Such self-conscious responses to genre occur, writes Geoff Klock (2002, p. 3), when the “building density of tradition becomes anxiety.” The superhero genre has mushroomed to such proportions that it seems uncontrollable, providing audiences w

Iron Man

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

upgradestechnologyinsigniacivilian alter egoidentity constructionOnce a costume is established as a representation of a certain set of values and abilities, the superhero identity can become more attached to the costume than to its wearer. In the case of Iron Man, identityidentity is more bound up in the costume than with any other superhero. Indeed, Iron Man is not a man, but an augmentation.

The X-Men

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction, 2016, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

identitycustomizationconformitycolorReynolds (1992, p. 26) observes that all superhero costumes function “as a uniform, binding together all super-beings.” The superhero uniformuniform asserts his readiness to perform acts of heroism, and aligns him with crime-fighting values. Costume “creates a community between its wearers” (ibid.), communicating to audiences that even the most isolated or rebellious superhero conforms to a core set of ideals that define the superhero genre. More so than other

Popular Culture And Forecasting

Evelyn L. Brannon and Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Forecasting, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

It used to be that we had six months to show something and then manufacture it. Now it only takes a week to copy something from an image on the Internet. So creatively, you have to be more and more unique.

Introduction—why write a book about sunglasses?

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

As a lecturer in visual culture in a fashion department, I had observed that sunglasses have also been remarkably resilient to changes in fashion and indeed in the sartorial languages of cool. Since sunglasses became fashionable in the early twentieth century, they have remained a powerful component of the fashionable or cool image; in fact, it seems sunglasses are almost synonymous with fashion, underscored by the iconic images of fashion elite like Anna Wintour and Karl Lagerfeld, both recogniz

Seeing in the “eclipse”—sunglasses, cool, and the absence of meaning (late 1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Warhol, Andyglamorempty (or hollow) glamorThe light is artificial and mirrors are provided, but not windows, because the characters must be protected from bleak, bruising reality.

Sunglasses and cool—conclusions

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Before sunglasses, certain modernitychangechanges were taking place which created an environment in which they could become functionally and symbolically useful. The city, as an exemplar of modern life, was a place of new opportunities for display, self-fashioning, and casual voyeurism, as well as new levels of sensory and psychological stimulation which threatened to swamp the individual, and from which some kind of protection was required. This initially came in the form of a “blasé attitude,”

Elvis Presley

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Elvis Presley’s ascent from impoverished childhood to worldwide fame as a singer and actor in the 1950s allowed him to indulge a love of clothes that began as a teenager. A career of over twenty years established a sharp-dressing persona, graduating into extravagant stage attire in the 1970s. The shock of his early death only served to increase the public’s fascination with him and to immortalize him as a cultural icon. Elvis’s handsome image continues to reassert itself in the early twenty-first

Madonna

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Madonna—singer, actress, entertainer—has maintained a consistently high profile since the early 1980s, when her feisty image and eclectic style choices resonated with a generation of young women. Sexualized, underwear-revealing costumes popularized the trend for underwear-as-outerwear. Her profile has ensured that designers have been thrilled to design for her, disseminating couture values to a wide audience; fashion has in turn absorbed her influence and aspects of her look continue to be regene

Véronique Branquinho

Alessandro Esculapio

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Red or Dead, Spring/Summer 1996

Jenny Evans

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Red or Dead’s “New York Dolls” collection caused outrage in the British tabloid press. The Mail on Sunday described the show as the “sick face of British fashion” after models brandished bloodied knives, knitting needles, and scissors. The clothing was almost overshadowed by the show’s melodramatic kitsch depiction of a dystopian future inhabited by “disturbed housewives.” While the emergence of “Cool Britannia” was attracting positive global attention, Wayne and Geraldine Hemingway, Red or Dead’

Conclusion: Fashionable Art

Adam Geczy and Jacqueline Millner

Source: Fashionable Art, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Introduction: Fashion and Cultural Memory

Heike Jenss

Source: Fashioning Memory. Vintage Style and Youth Culture, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

It is only through our ability to remember that we experience “being/becoming (in time)being” or “becoming” in time, experiences through which we develop a sense of selfsense of self in time and place and in relation to others (see Olick, Vinitzky-Seroussi and Levi 2011: 37). Or in other words, the activating, sharing and shaping of memories together with others is crucial to the formation of identities, the generation of social relations/social relationshipssocial relationships and our experienc

Marc Jacobs, Spring/Summer 1995

Hayley-Jane Mazières

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

When the American designer Marc Jacobs appeared on New York’s fashion scene, in 1986, after graduating from the Parsons School of Design, he promptly attracted the attention of the fashion press, which praised his playful yet sophisticated streetwear. During his appointment as Perry Ellis’s creative director from 1988, he dared to launch a groundbreaking grunge collection in 1992—the press loved it; Perry Ellis executives loathed it—and he was publicly suspended from his assignment. Nonetheless,

Dress Theory, Fashion and A Jazz Aesthetic

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

influence(s)between jazz/fashionmusiciansuse of clothingfashion designersincorporating meaningclothingas act of meaningFashion and jazz are disciplines that have significantly influenced one another in the first half of the twentieth century. Aesthetics, aestheticsdefineddefined as “the identification of the beautiful” (Weiner 2012: 8), were generated, shared and communicated through a merger of visual, behavioral and acoustic qualities among performers. In Cultural PassionsCultural Passions, Eli

Narcotics and Jazz: A Fashionable Addiction

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

There has been a narrative of narcotics in American popular culture. Narcotics are one of the five classes of drugs regulated by the Controlled Substances Act (CSA)Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in the United States. Classified as a Schedule I substance under the CSA, 21 U.S.C. § 812, heroin has “a high potential for abuse, no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision” (Drug Enforcement Administration 2012a).

Philadelphia Nightlife, Nostalgia and Popular Culture

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

vaudeville entertainmentsminstrel entertainmentAlthough New Orleans, New York and Chicago flourished with neighborhoods of jazz including Storyville, Harlem and the South Side correspondingly, Philadelphia, jazz cityPhiladelphia is a setting where innovators and establishments shaped a noteworthy history. The documentation of entertainment outlets was evidenced at the end of the first decade. From 1910 to 1919, society, political and religious groups promoted balls, dances and concerts via the Ph

Introducing Japanese Fashion, Past and Present

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Culture refers to behaviour and beliefs that are learned and shared: learned so it is not ‘instinctual’ and shared so it is not individual. Sharing refers to social sharing but there is no limitation as to the boundaries of this sociality. No territorial or historical boundaries are implied as part of the definition. This Wilson, Elizabeththe ‘format’ and ‘product’ theoryunderstanding of culture is open-ended. Leaning is always ongoing as a function of changing circumstances and therefore culture

Concluding Japanese Fashion Cultures, Change and Continuity

Masafumi Monden

Source: Japanese Fashion Cultures. Dress and gender in contemporary Japan, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

For both men and women, whenever sex is an issue, so also is looking and being seen. Every woman who has ever been accosted on the street knows the temporary desire to be invisible, just as every person of either sex has posed in public, hoping to be regarded as attractive by his or her peers.ValerieSteele, Fashion and Eroticism: Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Jazz Age (New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), p. 247.

Why Is Consumer Behavior Important to the Fields of Fashion and Design?

Patricia Mink Rath, Stefani Bay, Richard Petrizzi and Penny Gill

Source: The Why Of The Buy. Consumer Behavior and Fashion Marketing, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Did you know that there is a group of young African men from the Republic of the Congo, known as Sapeurs, or members of the Société des Ambianceurs et des Personnes élégantes (Society of Tastemakers and Elegant People), who, although chronically unemployed and living in the worst poverty, devote themselves to purchasing and wearing expensive clothing, made in the design houses of Paris, London, and Milan? To possess these precious pieces, Sapeurs do whatever it takes to make enough money to buy a

Punk

Monica Sklar

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Punk is one of the most influential and highly visible of modern subcultures around the globe. While maintaining its original cachet with subcultural wearers, the aesthetic is also seen on high-fashion runways, in mainstream mall stores, and in every ideation imaginable on the street. Many elements of punk dress, such as combat boots, studded belts, and vibrantly dyed hair, have become iconic in popular culture, yet symbolism and meanings have changed over time. Today’s punk dress is primarily ro

Teen Fashion: Youth and Identity in Popular Teen Dramas

Helen Warner

Source: Fashion on Television. Identity and Celebrity Culture, 2014, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Both Gossip Girl and The O.C. share similar thematic and narrative terrain. Each explores topics typically covered in teen dramas (friendship, alienation, family, sex and sexuality, drug and alcohol use, etc.) and is preoccupied with the anxieties regarding one’s position within social hierarchies. These anxieties are magnified insofar as they are shored up by an exploration of class relations; both shows are ‘fish-out-of-water’ narratives. The O.C. charts main character Ryan Attwood’s (Benjamin

Lesbian Style: From Mannish Women to Lipstick Dykes

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Of course, there’s a strict gay dress code no matter where you cruise. At the height of my college cruising, I was attending Take Back the Night meetings dressed in Mr Greenjeans overall, Birkenstocks, and a bowl haircut that made me look like I’d just been released from a bad foster home. There is nothing more pitiful to look at than a closeted femme.

Gay Men’s Style: From Macaroni to Metrosexual

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The term for the particular form of male style from the late eighteenth century, macaroni (or maccaroni), did in fact come from eating pasta (the Greek makaria literally means ‘food made from barley’), which had become fashionable in the 1760s through men who had returned to England after exploring the European continent, especially Italy, on the Grand Tour. Macaronis typically took pains to announce their difference in outlandish examples of foreign clothing that was either foreign—French and It

Drag: Of Kings and Queens

Adam Geczy and Vicki Karaminas

Source: Queer Style, 2013, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The stylistic ideal of the drag queen, is screaming vulgarity, the overstated look of the balloon-breasted tramp in the leopard-skin micro-mini skirt who strives to be loud, tawdry and cheap… unlike the lone fetishist who in an effort to ‘pass’, squeezes into corsets and tapes his breasts together to create the illusion of cleavage.Harris, The Rise and Fall of Gay Culture, 204.

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