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Secular Fashion In Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

national dress/costumeSabraIsrael, twentieth centuryIn national images depicting the early years of the State of Israel, the word “fashion” is deliberately associated with the unkempt pioneering sabra look: khakikhaki shorts and blue shirts characteristic of the socialist youth movements, pinafores and rubashka shirts influenced by Eastern European style, Bedouin kaffiyahkaffiyahs, biblical sandals, and dome-shaped caps known as kova tembel. To a large extent, this look became Israel’s national m

How Muslim Women Dress in Israel

Oz Almog

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Islamic/Muslim dressIn order to understand fully Muslim female dress in Israel, some basic concepts will be clarified here. Islam, like most other religions, regulates the behavior of its believers.Linda B. Arthur ed., “Introduction,” Religion, Dress and the Body, Oxford and NY: Berg, 1999, p. 1. Like other faiths, its legal code lays down rules regarding the related fields of clothing and sexuality.Steele, Valerie, Fashion and Eroticism, Ideals of Feminine Beauty from the Victorian Era to the Ja

Feminist Ideologies in Postmodern Japanese Fashion: Rei Kawakubo Meets Marie Antoinette in Downtown Tokyo

Ory Bartal

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

In the 1970s, the modernistic social paradigm collapsed in many post-industrial countries. In Japan, it resulted in the falling apart of the homogeneous culture that hailed collectivism. Various groups began to form. In 1970s Tokyo, the Karasu-Zoku (raven tribe) emerged as a parallel to the British Punk movement. Alongside the karasu-zoku was the an-non-zoku, a young and fashionable “tribe” consisting of women who enjoyed reading the mass communicationmagazinesmagazines an-an and non-no. The idea

Fashion and Feminism

Henriette Dahan-Kalev and Shoshana-Rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

civil rightsgenderDuring the French Revolution, dress became an important issue: one of the ways in which revolutionaries’ values were to be obtained and symbolized was through the adoption of class-less styles of clothing, which expressed the ideals of Fraternity, Liberty, and Equality.

Sartorial Boundaries on the Chinese Frontier

Antonia Finnane

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

I return home and see my kin …

Fashion Politics and Practice: Indian Cottons and Consumer Innovation in Tokugawa Japan and Early Modern England, C. 1600–1800

Beverly Lemire

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

textilescottonJapansixteenth–seventeenth centuriesEnglandsixteenth–seventeenth centuriesConsumerism, consumptionThe historical characteristics of consumer behavior have been the subject of intensive study for a generation.Among the pioneer studies see: Jan De Vries “Peasant Demand and Economic Development: Friesland 1559–1700,” in William Parker and E. L. Jones eds, European Peasants and their Markets, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975; Economic Policy and Projects: The Development of a

Dress as Political Ideology in Rabelais and Voltaire Utopias

Shoshana-rose Marzel

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

François Rabelais (1494–1553), a major French RenaissanceRenaissance writer and humanist, dedicated five novels to a family of giants and their adventures. Although these books are written in an amusing and satirical vein, through them Rabelais denounces Middle Ages backwardness and promotes Renaissance values; according to David M. Posner, “[t]he comic or parodic aspects of the text are, for Rabelais, inseparable from the hermeneutic act, and are essential both to accurate reading and to a recog

Ideology, Fashion and the Darlys’ “Macaroni” Prints

Peter Mcneil

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

Painted caricatures began on the “Grand TourGrand Tour” as private jokes shared between young men and their tutors. Private Italian painters working in Florence inspired the English development of this field. Etchings were made by Pier Leone Ghezzi (1674–1755) and Pietro Longhi (1702–85), and painted in Rome by English artists including Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Patch (1725–82). Horace Walpole wrote in his journal thus: “Patch was excellent in Caricatura, and was in much favour with the youn

Rabbinical Dress in Italy

Asher Salah

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

The promulgation of sumptuary laws, regulating specific items of dress that might be worn by various individuals on certain occasions, is a well-known chapter of European social history from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century.On Jewish sumptuary legislation in general see: Salo Wittmayer Baron, The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution, 3 vols, Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1942; Louis Finkelstein, Jewish Self-Government in the Middle Ages,

Breastfeeding, Ideology and Clothing in Nineteenth-Century France

Gal Ventura

Source: Dress and Ideology. Fashioning Identity from Antiquity to the Present 2017

Book chapter

The human species has always been dependent on breastfeeding, at least until the last third of the nineteenth century, when Louis Pasteur (1822–1895) invented the pasteurization of animal milk to be used to feed infants. Indeed, while examining artistic depictions of infant feeding through Western history, bottle-feeding was extremely rare in comparison to nursing women.See for example: Hubert Robert, Jeune femme tenant un biberon à un bébé, 1773, oil on canvas, 22 x 27 cm, Valence, Musée des Bea

Superman: Codifying the Superhero Wardrobe

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

Superman’s othernessotherness is firmly established in a costume that is identical from day to day. Wearing only one costume, Superman reduces his core values to a single, consistent message which is not compromised by daily adjustments to his wardrobe. This kind of “distinctive persistent dress,” finds Gregory Stone (1981, p. 144), is more commonly associated with professional responsibilities than with personal identity, and so through consistency of dress, Superman presents himself as acting i

Superheroes and the fashion of being unfashionable

Barbara Brownie and Danny Graydon

Source: The Superhero Costume. Identity and disguise in fact and fiction 2016

Book chapter

Those superhero costumes that remain most static over time are largely symbolic. When costumes are utilitarian, as with Iron Man (character)Iron Man’s suit, extreme transformation is justifiable as a technological development. By contrast, the costumes of Superman (character)Superman and Wonder WomanWonder Woman, which do little to enhance their performance, remain relatively consistent. Such garments function through stylistic or, following Barthes, RolandBarthes, linguistic expression, more tha

Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Modernity—an onslaught on the eyes

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

emotiondandyBefore the twentieth century, sunglasses as we think of them today were not in any kind of widespread use. Tinted glass (green or blue) had been recommended since the eighteenth century—but for correctivespectaclesspectacles (Ayscough in Drewry 1994) intended to be worn indoors. Mid-eighteenth century Venice saw green tinted glasses used against glare from the water (the “Goldoni” type, worn by and named after the leader of the commedia dell’ arte). At the turn of the nineteenth centu

Seeing the blur—perception, cool, and mechanized speed (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

speedindustrialised consciousness; panoramic perception; Virilio, PaulAlthough the now-ubiquitous image of bikini, shades, and sun-lounger might suggest that the ideal wearer of sunglasses enjoys the luxury of being blissfully inert, the dynamic power, excess, and seductive glamor of men and women speeding along in shades is undeniable—from the tough sheen of Marlon Brando in The Wild Ones to twenty-first century pop acts like Britney SpearsBritney Spears in “Toxic,” where impenetrable diamond-st

Introduction—why write a book about sunglasses?

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

As a lecturer in visual culture in a fashion department, I had observed that sunglasses have also been remarkably resilient to changes in fashion and indeed in the sartorial languages of cool. Since sunglasses became fashionable in the early twentieth century, they have remained a powerful component of the fashionable or cool image; in fact, it seems sunglasses are almost synonymous with fashion, underscored by the iconic images of fashion elite like Anna Wintour and Karl Lagerfeld, both recogniz

Seeing in the light—“sun”glasses, modern glamor, cool, and celebrity (1920s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Today, a more general sense that sunglasses protect our eyes from sunlight dominates. After all, the name finally settled on for all kinds of motor goggles, protective spectacles, autoglasses, and so on was (and is) sunglasses, conjuring up countless images of those bikini-clad women and casual, white linen-clad men basking in the glow of their own attractiveness, their sunglasses bouncing back that gold-colored light of happiness and success. Smiling or not, these men and women are embodiments o

Seeing in the dark—sunglasses and “outsider” cool (1940s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Many of the most evocative images show sunglasses worn in the dark, indoors, possibly because in these images we are forced to acknowledge their more oblique functions. Layers of darkness and blackness are compounded by dark frames with dark lenses in many of these images; think of Miles Davis in a murky club, in a dark suit, what light there is just highlighting the sheen of his skin against the intense glossy blackness of his shades.

Seeing the cyborg—eye-shading, cool, and the hi-tech body (1910–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Exploring speed in the last chapter has already enabled us to consider some aspects of the relationship between sunglasses and modern technologytechnology. But this relationship goes further. Sunglasses became a more general sign of encounters with the wonders and perils of modern technology; in the early days of TV advertising, sunglasses were worn by immaculate, 1950s housewives shading their eyes from the terrifying brilliance of whites achieved with innovative washing powders.

Heading for the shade—the spread of outsider cool (1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

outsiderSunglasses were tactically used by people who were “outside” the goals and means of dominant society, as part of an articulation of a dissonant style which held an attraction just as great as that of those sunny images of “straight” success and leisure. This chapter will show how the more complex connotations of “outsider cool” became desirable and were appropriated by the “mainstream” in the 1950s and 1960s and beyond. Sunglasses could act as a sign of a “bettered self”—but they also sta

Seeing in the “eclipse”—sunglasses, cool, and the absence of meaning (late 1950s–present)

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Warhol, Andyglamorempty (or hollow) glamorThe light is artificial and mirrors are provided, but not windows, because the characters must be protected from bleak, bruising reality.

Sunglasses and cool—conclusions

Vanessa Brown

Source: Cool Shades. The History and Meaning of Sunglasses 2015

Book chapter

Before sunglasses, certain modernitychangechanges were taking place which created an environment in which they could become functionally and symbolically useful. The city, as an exemplar of modern life, was a place of new opportunities for display, self-fashioning, and casual voyeurism, as well as new levels of sensory and psychological stimulation which threatened to swamp the individual, and from which some kind of protection was required. This initially came in the form of a “blasé attitude,”

All Out in the Wash: Convict Stain Removal in the Narryna Heritage Museum’s Dress Collection

Jennifer Clynk and Sharon Peoples

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This study extends historian Stefan Petrow’s 2009 study of the convict stain and Narryna by suggesting ways in which its effects can be overcome or reinterpreted, especially in relation to dress. The metaphor of the convict stain relates to a social stigma dating from the 1840s, when anti-transportationists in VDL began a fierce political and moral campaign against convict transportation to the colony. The stain metaphor was a nineteenth-century term applied by historians from the 1850s through t

Dress Thinking: Disciplines and Indisciplinarity

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter will consider some of the pioneering works in the field of dress history. Although these works predate any notion of interdisciplinarity, I believe they achieve an enviable ‘indisciplinarity’, a condition that offers an alternative to the contemporary disciplinary side-taking threatening to cannibalize our field. Before proceeding any further, however, it should be made clear that this chapter is in no way intended to be some sort of polemic against the current state of dress studies

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