Results: Text (19) Images (0)

Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 19 of 19 (1 pages)
    Page 1 of 1
Design Development for Menswear

John Hopkins

Source: Menswear, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A man should look as if he’s bought his clothes with intelligence, put them on with care and forgotten all about them.

Merchandise Planning

David Shaw and Dimitri Koumbis

Source: Fashion Buying. From Trend Forecasting to Shop Floor, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Merchandise planners have to gauge daily, weekly, and seasonal demand for what is probably one of the most difficult consumer products to predict. This difficulty arises from a number of factors, of which the need to successfully monitor and control stock is perhaps the most significant. If a fashion business has too little stock, it will potentially lose sales to competitors; on the other hand, if it has too much stock, it will have invested buying money that is effectively “dead.”

Developing a collection

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As a fashion designer, you can work at various “levels” within the fashion industry. The choice of direction you make will depend on your training, ability, and interests—as well as, of course, how much you would like to be paid for your work. Finding your niche in fashion design may be something that you’ve been working toward from the beginning—or it may evolve more organically as you continue on your career path.

The Nature of Fashion

Elaine Stone and Sheryl A. Farnan

Source: In Fashion, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Behold the many faces of fashion—fun, fantastic, frivolous, frantic, fabulous, futuristic, flirtatious, fresh, and financial. Fashion is all of this, and much more. Fashion is the most dynamic of American businesses. It thrives on change—and change is the engine that fuels it. Life might be easier if we never had to change. However, if the fashion business did not change, it would not survive. Refer to Figure 1.1 for an example of fashion’s constant evolution.

Vivienne Westwood’s Elevated Ghillie Shoes from 1993

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” collection, Vivienne Westwood perched her models on extremely elevated platform shoes. Inspired, as most of her collection, by Scottish traditional garments, the platform shoes reinterpreted ancestral ghillies worn for folkloric dances. However, apart from the lacing structure, the shoes were more reminiscent of fetish footwear—an aesthetic typical of Vivienne Westwood’s taste for combining conservatism with subversiveness. When the British designer rein

Bill Blass, Fall/Winter 1997

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Shown in the tents at Bryant Park, New York, Bill Blass’s fall/winter 1997 collection did not have any one particular theme. Instead, he designed simple, classic clothes encompassing a range of styles and looks. There were hints of the 1980s, a decade that other designers—such as Oscar de la Renta—looked to for inspiration for their own fall collections. There were animal prints—ranging from giraffe to python—that glorified the animal kingdom, cubist-patterned velvet jackets over wool pants, and

Discharging Color and Using Resists

Kimberly A. Irwin

Source: Surface Design for Fabric, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A negative image or pattern on a dark-colored fabric or leather can be created by removing color (Figure 2.1). Color removal can also be beneficial as an all-over lightener or used before applying other dyes or prints to provide a lighter base, thus creating more vibrant results.

Valentino, Fall/Winter 1992

Rosily Roberts

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Valentino’s fall/winter 1992 collection, designed shortly after his thirtieth anniversary in the fashion industry, draws on both the history of Western dress and clothing from China and Japan for inspiration. The dramatic silhouette of his 1980s lines has disappeared, and he is allowing for a greater exposure of the model’s body as he creates a collection out of luxurious materials that is rich with detailing. The timeless elegance that he was so well known for by the 1990s continues to appear in

Valentino Couture, Fall/Winter 2000

Rosily Roberts

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 2000, Valentino celebrated forty years in the fashion industry with a series of events and a special display of his previous designs. This collection, created in the midst of this period of self-reflection and celebration, is a witness to that. There are clear references among the garments to previous designs and the fashions of the previous century, which Valentino looks to for inspiration. His fall/winter 2000 designs are slimmer and more revealing than those of the 1980s, displaying more of

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1990

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Two years after the acquisition of Givenchy by Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessey (LVMH), Givenchy’s fall/winter 1990 collection struggled to negotiate its legacy as a couture line and produce designs to appeal to a contemporary clientele. Elements that had worked in favor of the house in the 1980s drew criticism. While other designers unstructured their silhouettes, Givenchy presented square shoulders on wool suits and evening wear alike. Gold lamé and organza dresses with short, dipping hemlines were

Givenchy Couture, Fall/Winter 1983

Aimee Williams

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Givenchy’s well-received fall/winter 1983 couture collection augured the opulence of the decade. Lavish surfeit came in many options for patrons, from jewel-encrusted leather boleros and skirt suits trimmed with mink and fox fur for day, to sequined metallic gowns for evening. Suede and leather gloves and hats and oversized jewels accessorized hand-painted silk skirts and dresses. The chemise and the hourglass shape prevailed. The former figure came in a range of sumptuous textiles, corresponding

Chapter five: Ever-Changing Fashion and its Acceptance

Jay Diamond and Ellen Diamond

Source: The World of Fashion, 5th Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Every generation laughs at old fashions but religiously follows the new.

The fashion machine

Susan Dillon

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Management, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The fashion calendar is a key component in the organization of the fashion industry. It is the tool that facilitates the smooth running of the global fashion network, ensuring that events do not overlap but are also close enough together to enable a buyer to make an extended trip each season to see what is on offer in the fashion capitals of the world. With the advent of the Internet there are many companies publishing this information online and providing their own versions of fashion calendars.

The Design Process and Specialty Apparel

Evelyn L. Brannon

Source: Designer’s Guide to Fashion Apparel, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“The consumer wants to see value, a perceived need, and/or an emotional connection to the product. In response to this we have added value by incorporating fabric innovation and sharpening our design focus.”

Context & communication

Alex Russell

Source: The Fundamentals of Printed Textile Design, 2011, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Seen as a whole, the industry works along broadly similar models. Although there may be variations with individual companies, particularly those in different sectors such as fashion or furnishing, certain key criteria are used by almost all employers or clients that printed textile designers are likely to find themselves working for. Factors such as season, the use of trend predictions or forecasts and the marketing of design products to specific target customers are standard practice. At the ver

Paris as a Fashion City

Martine Elzingre

Translated by Pierre Hodgson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Paris fashions—clothes, lingerie, accessories, and jewelry, together with other beauty products such as hairstyles, fragrances, and cosmetics—have come to dominate the world beyond the borders of France, as well as beyond Europe and indeed outside the West. In Paris itself, the two arts of dressing and seduction have thrived because innumerable ideas and techniques for applying those ideas have constantly been discovered—a continual process of experimentation.

The Product and Pricing

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Intern, 2nd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A product is anything offered to a market for attention, acquisition, use, or consumption. It is capable of satisfying a consumer’s want or need and may be an object, service, activity, place, organization, or idea. A product can be a dress, a pair of shoes, an image makeover, a promotional plan, a trend forecast, a fashion show production, and more. The product may be intangible or tangible. Intangible products are t

Fashion Week

Lise Skov

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In the late twentieth century, fashion week became the standard name for biannual or annual trade fairs and fashion shows. For high-end designers’ biannual presentations, the term collections has been widely used; for example, the Paris Collections or the Tokyo Collections, and the Moscow fairs that started in 2002 are identified by the abbreviation CPM (Collection Première Moscow, organized by Igedo). Trade fairs have been known by a number of different names; in the 1970s, Hong Kong Fashion Wee

Wardrobe Selection Factors

Nancy Plummer

Source: Your Personal Style, 2009, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

“But great style, and a great career, can come only from being true to one’s self, one’s taste, and one’s values.”

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 19 of 19 (1 pages)
Page 1 of 1