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Ideals for Individual Appearance and the Art of Dress

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

The African Wrapper

Christopher Richards

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The wrapper, known by a variety of names including lappa and pagne, is one of the simplest and most visually present forms of bodily adornment found across the African continent. Although the material of a wrapper can vary from strip-woven, hand-dyed textiles to industrially printed cotton, the method for wearing a wrapper is remarkably consistent: the textile is wrapped horizontally around the wearer’s waist, and secured to the body through a process of folding or knotting that can reflect speci

Ghana

Doran H. Ross

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Africa, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Modern Ghana (to be distinguished from the medieval kingdom of Ghana in Mali) is centered on the Atlantic coast of West Africa and is firmly within the tropics with its shoreline about five degrees north of the equator. The country is bordered by Togo on the east, Burkina Faso on the north, and Côte d’Ivoire on the west, and, like all countries in Africa, it shares a history of dress with its neighbors. The contemporary peoples of Ghana may be conveniently divided between the largely Muslim north

The Power of Touch: Women’s Waist Beads in Ghana

Suzanne Gott

Source: Dress Sense. Emotional and Sensory Experiences of the Body and Clothes, 2007, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Within the Ashanti region, it has been a long-established practice for mothers to adorn infant daughters with strands of beads tied loosely around their hips, wrists, ankles, and above their calves and forearms in the belief that this will aid in the development of a full, beautifully shaped body (Figure 8.2).Some women report that beads may be placed on infant boys because they, too, “need shape” to be attractive. But if so, these beads are removed after a few weeks while, until recent years,

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