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Traje De Crioula: Representing Nineteenth-Century Afro-Brazilian Dress

Aline T. and Monteiro Damgaard

Source: Dress History. New Directions in Theory and Practice 2015

Book chapter

This chapter examines representations of Afro-Brazilian dress from nineteenth-century Brazil with the aim of examining the traje de crioula’s origin, formation and influence. The research includes comparative analysis of a broad range of nineteenth-century visual representations and written descriptions alongside analysis of surviving garments currently held in museum collections, and their subsequent interpretation and display. To present a case study for this chapter, a sample of four images is

Carmen Miranda

Fiona Corbridge

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Carmen Miranda was born in Portugal but grew up in Rio de Janeiro and considered herself a Brazilian. Her love of singing led to a career as a musical star in Brazil, going on conquer the US in 1939. Her cheery, colorful persona wiggled through a succession of Hollywood movies in extraordinary costumes that celebrated the color and passion of Brazil and its music, accented with Carmen’s trademark headpieces. Her influence on fashion in her lifetime was strong, with ranges of clothing, jewelry, sh

Alexandre Herchcovitch

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Carolina Herrera

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

For reasons concerning the politics of power governing the site I had chosen to do my fieldwork on, I was told by the party’s manager that I should not talk to the dancers at the events. If I wanted to do my research there I should carry it out in a discreet and silent way. Not daring to question this, I went to the top of the stand facing the dance floor and started to watch the festivities from there. My project of considering the objects through their materiality and agency had to be postponed

The Jeans that Don’t Fit: Marketing Cheap Jeans in Brazil

Rosana Pinheiro-Machado

Source: Global Denim 2011

Book chapter

In the Denim Manifesto anthropologists are challenged to study denim – something that is commonplace in our everyday lives but notably absent from ethnographic analyses. As a manifesto, the authors refute the ontological philosophical logic that an element, such as clothing, that is located on the surface of bodies is intrinsically a superficial problem. Instead they consider the philosophical implications of the use of jeans – a clothing resource that resolves the anxiety and the contradictions

Secondhand Clothing

Karen Tranberg Hansen

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Secondhand clothing constitutes a global market of commerce and consumption that has a long but changing history with complex links to garment production, tailoring, and couture. In Europe and North America, secondhand clothing was an important source of clothing well into the nineteenth century, until mass production and growing prosperity enabled more and more people to purchase brand-new rather than previously worn garments. During Europe’s imperial expansion, the trade in secondhand clothing

Dress and Fashion Education: Design and Business

Jane E. Hegland

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Haute couture education can be traced back to Louis XIV’s court, where French fashions were promoted through fashion dolls. Early education was informal, mostly based on apprenticeships. In the nineteenth century, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture was formed, providing a formalized education for couturiers. By 1927, the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne emerged as a universally recognized institution. Since these beginnings, the design and business of fashion has expa

Cosmetics, Non-Western

Paula Heinonen

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Hispanic and Latino American

Josephine M. Moreno

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The heritage of Latinos living in the United States and Canada is a mixture of Spanish, Portuguese, European, Native, African, Asian, and other ancestry. Dress needs vary widely and are influenced in part by socioeconomic status, age, income, education, immigration status, faith, popular culture, and gender. Family values and faith play a significant role in Hispanic families and influence dress purchases, particularly for special occasion wear. Latinos also tend to be brand-conscious. Although a

Latin American Fashion

Regina A. Root

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Regional Dress of Latin America in a European Context

Patricia Rieff Anawalt

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

A collision of cultures occurred at the time of Spain’s sixteenth-century conquest of the two great empires of the Americas, the Mesoamerican Aztecs of central Mexico and the Andean Inka of today’s Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. Latin America’s present-day traditional dress—the distinctive, non-Western-style clothing still worn by many Central American and Andean Indians—is an amalgam of New World indigenous apparel and Spanish Colonial–period peasant attire: Two contrasting concepts of clothing con

Mappin Stores: Adding an English Touch to the São Paulo Fashion Scene

Rita Andrade

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

The decision to choose São Paulo for the site of a new English department store stemmed from the fact that commercial relations had existed between Brazil and England since the eighteenth century, during the colonial period and following independence from Portugal. European influences had been prevalent since 1763, when Brazil’s capital was transferred to Rio de Janeiro in order to accommodate expanding commercial activities. This shift began the development of the southeast and, a few decades la

Dress, Body, and Culture in Brazil

Rita Andrade and Regina A. Root

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion magazines in Europe and the United States often use stereotyped, exotic images when portraying Brazilian fashion. Today, Brazilian designers are responding with designs questioning the very concept of “Brazilianness,” seeking to understand and explore multicultural influences. Brazil has a rich, though not well known, sartorial history, showing dramatic regional variation. Before the sixteenth century, natives processed fibers from native plants, which were used for adornment, hammocks, a

National Brand of Colombia

Daniel Salazar Angarita

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Since its beginnings as a Spanish colony, Colombia has demonstrated a great interest in Western fashion, as compared to other styles that have persisted as part of its pre-Hispanic past. In the early years of the twenty-first century, the Colombian Identity project, promoted by several governmental organizations, has integrated fashion designers and craftsmen, with the objective of creating a fashion unique to Colombia. The production of most important items of Western apparel in Colombia has bee

Film and Fashion

Alba F. Aragón

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Attempting a full account of film and fashion in the two dozen nations of Latin America is a daunting task. The mere concept of regional and even national cinemas in Latin America is subject to debate, while the question of what Latin American fashion is has only begun to be addressed by scholars. The development of film in Latin America has been uneven and multifaceted. Often, films produced in Latin America have been purveyors of foreign fashion trends. Occasionally, they have sought to documen

Pre-Hispanic Dress in Colombia and Ecuador

Karen Olsen Bruhns

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

The northern Andean region is geographically and culturally distinct from the central Andes. The mountains are lower, and much of the land is tropical or subtropical, owing to a wide coastal plain in Ecuador and the north–south river valleys of Colombia, all warm and well-watered. The hot, semiarid plains of the Caribbean and of southern Ecuador must also be taken into account, because it was here that ceramics, agriculture, and the earliest evidence of weaving first appeared in South America. Al

The Center for Traditional Textiles of Cuzco, Peru

Nilda Callañaupa and Timothy Wells

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

In 1994 the Center for the Traditional Textiles of Cusco (CTTC: Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco) was established to promote and enable the weaving of traditional textiles in the Cuzco region of the central Andes. In part, CTTC recognized that the weaving and use of traditional textiles would approach extinction within the present generation if something was not done to alter the situation.

South American Headwear

Beverly Chico

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Two basic factors influence clothing and headwear worn by South Americans; one derives from ancient indigenous cultures, and the other from cultural diffusion resulting from the conquest and colonization by the Spanish and Portuguese. Most South Americans today are of mixed racial heritage. The modern urban population usually wears European- or American-style manufactured clothing and headwear. In more isolated areas, characteristic head coverings are still worn, exemplified in three climate regi

Ponchos of the River Plate: Nostalgia for Eden

Ruth Corcuera

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

Rooted in elements that define the Argentine patrimony, the poncho is present in our art, our literature, our songs. It speaks to us of Creole customs and its recollection fragments into infinite images. The poncho is, as is well known, a rectangular garment generally measuring 1.8 m by 1.4 m; it has an opening in the center enabling the wearer to pull it over his head and leave it resting on his shoulders, from which it falls in harmonious and baggy folds, amply covering the body and arms. Depen

Representations of Tradition in Latin American Boundary Textile Art

Elyse Demaray, Melody Keim-Shenk and Mary A. Littrell

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

“Tradition,” is an elusive term that scholars understand in different and often conflicting ways. Some of the primary questions involved in determining the precise meaning of tradition as it relates to boundary textiles include the following: when we speak of traditional textiles, are we referring to designs, colors, fibers, the means of production or all of these elements from the past? How can we determine when a “tradition” began? How long does a design, color, fiber, or technology have to per

“Why Do Gringos Like Black?” Mourning, Tourism and Changing Fashions in Peru

Blenda Femenías

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

One April afternoon, Nilda Bernal took an order for a black vest from my friend. While Patricia Jurewicz and I were riding the bus from Arequipa to the Colca Valley for Semana Santa (Holy Week) of 1992, we had discussed buying embroideries. A textile designer from the United States then living in Peru, Jurewicz was intrigued by bordados, the distinctive Colca-style embroidered clothes.My writings about Peruvian dress, especially Colca bordados, include Femenías 1996, 1997, 2001, 2004, and n.d. To

Scattered Bodies, Unfashionable Flesh

Fabricio Forastelli

Source: The Latin American Fashion Reader 2005

Book chapter

The Nasca on the South Coast of Peru

Mary Frame

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Knowledge of how people dressed in the Nasca region during the early phases of the Nasca period (1–300 c.e.) is reconstructed largely from archaeological sources. The garments themselves have been preserved in burials and ritual deposits, and technical studies of the garments reveal how they were made. In the middle and late phases (300–600 c.e.), textile preservation is too sporadic to provide an accurate overview of Nasca dress. Nasca people embellished their woven clothing with dyeing, embroid

Ancient Peruvian Gold and Silver Jewelry: Fashion and Religion

Carole Fraresso

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Latin America and the Caribbean 2005

Encyclopedia entry

Gold metalworking is a human activity that dates back to antiquity. Mining and refining gold, combining it with other metals to obtain harder or colored alloys, melting it, and forming it into outstanding objects—knowledge of these techniques contributed to increasing the value of gold and justified its use in all ancient hierarchical societies.Worldwide, gold has fascinated human beings. From Mesopotamia to Europe, to the Middle East, ancient Egypt, India, China, and Mexico, gold has been the su

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