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Introduction

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Exploring contemporary fashion imagery shows that the mythical or stereotypical connotations of tweeds form a useful starting point for a deeper investigation into their history. For example, an advertisementsadvertisement in Vogue magazinesVogue for Lauren, RalphRalph Lauren’s autumn/winter 2012 womenswear collection featured outfits that were strongly influenced by British country house partiescountry clothing and 1920s fashion, including fitted jackets and jodhpurs in tweed, worn with “mannish

Origins and Early Development of Tweed to 1850

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Gulvin, CliffordGulvin argues that improvements made in the Scottish woolen industry between 1770 and the late 1820s helped to lay the foundations for the later successful development of tweed production. Prior to the 1770s, the production of woolens in Scotland was considerably less advanced than that of its neighbor England in terms of its economic success and the quality of its cloths. By the late eighteenth century, England had long been renowned for producing fine broadclothsbroadcloths, whi

Tweed, Male Fashion, and Modern Masculinities, 1851–1918

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Tweed trouserstrousers in “shepherd’s check” patternshepherd’s checks and other fancy woolensfancy patterns remained popular in Britain and Europe in the 1850s and 1860s.JamesLocke, “A Few Facts on the Tweed Trade,” The Border Advertiser, September 18, 1863, p. 3; CliffordGulvin, The Tweedmakers: A History of the Scottish Fancy Woollen Industry 1600–1914 (Newton Abbot: David & Charles, 1973), p. 80; FaridChenoune, A History of Men’s Fashion (Paris: Flammarion, 1993), pp. 84–5. The Juror’s Report

Couture to Pop and Nostalgic Fashion, 1953–1980

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Between the early 1950s and the late 1970s, the production of woolen cloths in Britain was still primarily concentrated in Yorkshire wool textiles industryYorkshire, Scotland and the West of England woolen industryWest of England.G. F.Rainnie, The Woollen and Worsted Industry: An Economic Analysis (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1965), pp. 29–31. Yorkshire continued to suitsfor menform by far the largest manufacturing region and Brearley, AlanBrearley and Iredale, John A.Iredale concluded in 1977 that

Tradition and Innovation, 1981–2014

Fiona Anderson

Source: Tweed, 2018, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Hardill, IreneHardill’s study shows that woolen manufacturing in Yorkshire wool textiles industryYorkshire, which was still by far the largest center of that industry in the UK had suffered major contraction by 1981.IreneHardill, The Regional Implications of Restructuring (Aldershot: Gower Publishing Company Limited, 1987), pp. 193–4. Research for this book has identified that by 2014, the few firms trading from Yorkshire that made tweeds and other woolen cloths, included Abraham Moon & SonsAbrah

Materials and Graphics Used in Visual Merchandising and Store Design

Martin M. Pegler and Anne Kong

Source: Visual Merchandising and Display, 7th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The more a designer knows about the woodcharacteristics ofcharacteristics of wood and its source, the better he or she can understand the degree of warmth and beauty it can bring to the fix-turing or store design. Every grain pattern is a unique masterpiece of design, texture, and wonder. These grain patterns also known as “figures or growth rings,” describe the texture found in wood such as BirdseyeBirdseye, curly, or fiddlebackfiddleback. Wood can be warm and welcoming or cool and contemporary,

Tilda Swinton

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Scottish actor, model, and muse Tilda Swinton was born in London in 1960. After graduating from Cambridge she began a career acting on stage, and later in film, winning an Academy Award for her performance in Michael Clayton. She has played muse to fashion designers and artists alike, collaborating on a collection for Viktor & Rolf (2003) and starring in a short film by fashion designer Hussein Chalayan (Absent Present, 2005). In recent years she has been the face of campaigns for designers inclu

Vivienne Westwood’s Elevated Ghillie Shoes from 1993

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

For her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” collection, Vivienne Westwood perched her models on extremely elevated platform shoes. Inspired, as most of her collection, by Scottish traditional garments, the platform shoes reinterpreted ancestral ghillies worn for folkloric dances. However, apart from the lacing structure, the shoes were more reminiscent of fetish footwear—an aesthetic typical of Vivienne Westwood’s taste for combining conservatism with subversiveness. When the British designer rein

Vivienne Westwood, “Anglomania,” Fall/Winter 1993–1994

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

From being queen of punk in the mid-1970s, Vivienne Westwood slightly moved, from the 1980s, to being a supporter of British fashion’s establishment. Inspired by traditional craftsmanship and eighteenth-century art, the designer has since infused her collections with historicism. With her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” show, Vivienne Westwood epitomized her interest in English and Scottish traditions while mingling masculine tailoring with outrageously feminine forms. Featuring laced bodices,

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Kilt

Andrew Bolton

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The kilt as we know it today originated in the first quarter of the eighteenth century. Known to the Gaelic-speaking Highlander as the “little wrap” (feileadh beag), it evolved from the “big wrap” (feileadh mor), or belted plaid, the first identifiably “Scottish” costume that emerged in the late sixteenth century. Earlier, the Scottish Gaels had worn the same clothes as their Irish counterparts, namely a shirt known in Gaelic as the léine and a semicircular mantle known in Gaelic as the brat.

Why Does the United Kingdom Not Have National Dress?

Alison L. Goodrum

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The United Kingdom (UK) is multinational, comprising Wales, Scotland, England (with these three forming Great Britain), and Northern Ireland. This alliance is a product of various constitutional reforms and Acts of Union, carried out and revised over several centuries. These ongoing revisions help explain the lack of UK national dress as the expression of a stable, collective identity. The UK is effectively a collection of nations, with their own identities and recognizable national dress. The un

Early History of Dress and Fashion in Great Britain and Ireland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Little is known about clothing in the British islands before the Roman invasion in 43 c.e.. What survives are cloth fragments and amazing jewelry such as brooches and torcs. Pre-Christian graves suggest that women wore tunics. The advent of Christianity possibly resulted in women covering their heads. The medieval period saw Europe stabilize after the raids and invasions of the Dark Ages. Trade increased greatly, much of it related to textiles. From the fourteenth century onward dress styles have

Scotland

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

By 1800, those people in Scotland who could afford it dressed in the style of clothing usually known as fashionable West European. This was no different from the dress of others of their class within Britain. There is no folk dress in Scotland, but there are some types of occupational dress that have been associated with Scotland or with particular types of work. Those who had little income for clothing dressed in what they could afford or were given by charities. As in former times, secondhand c

‘Ladies from Hell’

Thomas S. Abler

Source: Hinterland Warriors and Military Dress. European Empires and Exotic Uniforms, 1999, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Britain recruited its first exotic warriors from its northern frontier. Scotland had long been a source of fighting men for the continent, both before and after union with the English Crown. Scottish archers first served as bodyguards to the French monarch in 1440. In the Thirty Years War, Swedish King Gustavus Adolphus employed some 20,000 Scots, while opposed to Gustavus Adolphus were some 10,000 Scots serving in the army of France (Wood 1987: 13). The oldest infantry regiment in the British Ar

‘Freezing the Frame’: Dress and Ethnicity in Brittany and Gaelic Scotland

Malcolm Chapman

Source: Dress and Ethnicity. Change Across Space and Time, 1995, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

The “traditional dress” of Highland Scotland, in this sense, is a collection of clothing for men: its essential item is the tartan kilt, with the addition of items such as knee-length woolen socks, sgiandu, and sporran. This set of garments has never been the popular dress of anyone, outside the Scottish Highland regiments of the British army, and outside self-consciously folkloric circles (dancing groups, choirs, the “White Heather Club”, and so on). The central item, however, the kilt, does ech

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