Results: Text (226) Images (0)

Filtered by:

Clear filters
Sort by
Results per page
Results showing
1 - 25 of 226 (10 pages)
    Page 1 of 10
Jane Birkin

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Jane Birkin (born 14 December 1946) is an English singer-songwriter, actress, and political activist. Coming of age in west London in the early 1960s, she made her first appearances in films such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up (1966), in which she was the first English actress to appear fully naked in a mainstream film, playing the leggy model known simply as “the blonde.”In 1968, she left Swinging London for Paris and despite not being fluent in French, she won the lead role in Francis Giro

Talitha Getty

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Talitha Dina Pol (1940–1971) was born in Bali. After moving to London in 1945, following a traumatic period spent with her birth mother in a Japanese POW camp, Talitha studied at Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with hopes of becoming an actress. Young, beautiful, and exotic, she was courted and celebrated by London society, becoming the second wife of John Paul Getty Jnr., the son of oil tycoon Paul Getty, in 1966. She wore an all-white, mink-trimmed, hooded minidress that echoed the height of Swi

Orientalism in Fashion

Osman Ahmed

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This essay explores the relationship with fashion and Orientalism as a modern study of Western culture, as well as an ancient dialogue between East and West that has laid the foundations for the modern fashion system. Designers discussed include Paul Poiret, Yves Saint Laurent, and John Galliano, who each represent various waves of Orientalism and the changing ways in which its appearance in fashion collections contributed to the course of fashion and design history.

John Galliano, Graduate Collection, “Les Incroyables” 1984

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

While studying languages at City and East London College in Whitechapel, London, John Galliano took various design and drawing classes. His tutors encouraged him to apply to the foundation course at Saint Martin’s School of Art (later Central Saint Martins). His application was successful, and through illustration courses he found fashion design. Outside of classes, Galliano worked as sales assistant at Topshop, as a dresser at the National Theatre, and learned tailoring skills as an apprentice f

John Galliano, Fall/Winter 1994–1995

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In 1990, John Galliano moved from London to Paris. His early years in Paris are described as an ebb and flow, mostly determined by financial backing or the lack thereof. Cycles of decline and regrowth have since characterized the public perception of Galliano. After forgoing the previous season due to lack of funds, Galliano’s spring/summer 1994 collection was presented in the Louvre’s Cour Carrée to critical acclaim. In March 1994, pieces from the collection were celebrated in a Vogue editorial

John Galliano, Spring/Summer 1990

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The unexpected success of John Galliano’s graduate collection for Saint Martin’s School of Art in 1984 led to an account with the London department store Browns and opportunities for financial backing. Galliano immersed himself in the creative process, with little concern for business matters. In 1987 he was announced as British Designer of the Year; he would receive the award again in 1994, 1995, and 1997. Galliano had been active in the London club scene during his time at Saint Martin’s. This

John Galliano for Christian Dior Ready-to-Wear, Spring/Summer 1999

Paula Alaszkiewicz

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In late 1996, after a relatively short tenure at Givenchy, it was announced that John Galliano would replace Gianfranco Ferré at fellow LVMH-owned Christian Dior. His arrival at Dior corresponded with the house’s fiftieth anniversary and Galliano’s first task was to create an haute couture collection. The show was staged in a recreated couture salon and featured Galliano’s signature theatricality. Drama of presentation later culminated with the fall/winter 1998–1999 couture show “A Voyage on the

Rifat Özbek, Spring/Summer 1991

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Rifat Özbek’s spring/summer collection of 1991 exemplifies his ability to successfully commoditize the very essence of ethnicity without alienating the young, creative, Western urbanites who were his collaborators and would eventually become his customers. This situates him as an early agent in the emergence of a cosmopolitan aesthetic in fashion. As today’s industry becomes increasingly provincialized and the big four fashion capitals have to cede some of their influence to satellite sites, Özbe

Shape/Volume

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

To fully understand the significance of “volume” in fashion, it is necessary to discuss everything from the exaggerated shoulders in the trend for tailored power dressing in the 1980s to the unconventional draping and pleating of Issey Miyake. The prism of volume enables the unpacking of aesthetic traditions in dress and fashion that appear to have little in common. When designers utilize volume, they are often presenting a fantasy from a distant land or a reimagined time. When individuals choose

Camouflage on the Catwalk

Ariel Beaujot

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The camouflage pattern that is so ubiquitous in Western clothing styles was developed to hide machinery during World War I; it only became a pattern for clothing for troops in World War II. “Camo” is key for war because it helps items blend into the background and it disrupts the shape of forms. Largely because of Army Surplus Stores, camo became a pattern used in street fashion in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. The meaning of camo in this period varied from antiwar protest to a reconnection with n

Futurism

Fruzsina Bekefi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This article examines futurism in fashion in the twentieth century and it will focus on the work of designers between 1970 and 2000. It characterizes the theme, its meaning, and relevance during different eras by charting its progression from the fashions promoted by Italian futurists to the utopian designs of the space age. It also explores how contemporary designers have interpreted futuristic trends. Futuristic fashion is shown to intimately reflect on the conditions of existence in years to c

Men in Skirts

Fruzsina Bekefi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The male skirt has evolved throughout fashion history. From a traditional form of dress worn in Ancient Greece and Rome, non-bifurcated garments worn by men came to be perceived as a challenge to conventional gender norms in the West. Designers such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Vivienne Westwood have used male skirts to interpret masculinity through their designs in the latter half of the twentieth century. In the early twenty-first century, male skirts are gaining traction again.

“Coiled Corset,” Shaun Leane for Alexander McQueen, Fall/Winter 1999

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The “Coiled Corset” is an example of radical body adornment made by jeweler Shaun Leane for fashion designer Alexander McQueen’s collection “The Overlook” (fall/winter 1999). Leane, who originally trained as a jeweler and goldsmith, first worked with McQueen in 1995, when he made silver watch chains for his “Highland Rape” collection (fall/winter 1995). His creative collaborations with McQueen soon propelled him to work with new materials and on a much larger scale to create elaborate body sculpt

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” Trousers

Kate Bethune

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Alexander McQueen’s “Bumster” trousers caused a sensation as one of the most provocative designs of the 1990s. McQueen redefined the silhouette with the Bumsters by cutting the waistband two inches below that of hipster trousers to elongate the torso and expose the lower spine and top of the buttocks. Although a prototype pair was made in late 1992, Bumsters first appeared on the catwalk in McQueen’s inaugural show, “Nihilism” (spring/summer 1994). Reappearing in collections including the controv

Makeup on the Catwalk from the 1970s to 2000

Geraldine Biddle-Perry

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

This article is an exploratory history within a history of the catwalk since the 1970s. It examines the centrality of makeup to shifting systems and structures of catwalk performance and spectacle, but it is not a trend-by-trend analysis of cosmetic practices and products. Rather, the aim is to examine catwalk makeup as a generative force within the wider transformation of fashion image as commodity and cultural form in the latter decades of the twentieth century.

Grace Jones

Shayla Corinne Black

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Born in 1948 in Spanish Town, Jamaica, Grace Jones’s whimsical career began as a model, where she was a brash addition to international designers Yves Saint Laurent, Claude Montana, and Kenzo Takada. Grace Jones obliterated all boundaries with her incorporation of gender-bending fashions, notorious buzz-cut hairstyle, and her determination to don original and outrageous styles. Artists like Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, and Rihanna have all paid homage to Jones for her exuberance and eccentricity, whic

Hip-Hop

Shayla Corinne Black

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Hip-hop is a multifaceted genre of twentieth-century music, whose influence has expanded from the streets to the runway. It is a global phenomenon embraced by millions. Hip-hop began in the Bronx, New York and was forged by black youth as a form of artistic expression. Groups like Run-D.M.C. were iconic with their trademarks: Adidas sneakers, tracksuits, bucket hats, and gold rope chains. The fashion world avidly participated by appropriating the bright colors, athletic wear, loose-fitting garmen

Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

David Bowie

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

David Bowie is the musician most closely associated with glam rock, a genre of music that enjoyed great popularity in the 1970s, particularly in the United Kingdom. Glam rock was more than just music: it was about epic, elaborate concert productions, exuberant costumes and makeup, and playful exploration of gender identity. Bowie was born Robert David Jones on 8 January 1947 in Brixton, London. In the late 1960s, Bowie began a career as a psychedelic folk rock singer with several singles and the

Kurt Cobain

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Kurt Cobain, the lead singer of Nirvana, was born on 20 February 1967 in Aberdeen in the state of Washington. He became the salient figure in grunge music, a style that developed in the Pacific Northwest of the United States in the middle of the 1980s and achieved global popularity in the early 1990s. Grunge is a style of alternative rock based on accented percussion, heavy electric guitar riffs, electronic distortion, and loud—often howling—vocals. Nirvana, formed in 1988, became one of the most

Adam Ant

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

In the early 1980s, pop musicians embraced historicism in their performance attire. Adam and the Ants, a new wave band based in London, donned clothing inspired by historic military outfits, nineteenth-century dandies, and pirates. They were among the recognized leaders of the New Romantics movement, a London youth subculture known for its taste for eccentric fashion. The band was formed in 1977 and achieved fame with a streak of successful albums, particularly Kings of the Wild Frontier (1980) a

Fashion Journalism and the Catwalk

Julie Bradford

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

The second half of the twentieth century may go down as a golden age for the fashion press covering the collections. As ready-to-wear shows multiplied and fashion became part of popular culture—but before live-streaming and social media meant that everyone could see collections instantly—journalists were in a uniquely privileged position to convey news of this exciting new world to a burgeoning audience. This article will investigate how integral the press was to the development of fashion shows

Sunglasses

Vanessa Brown

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

By the late 1960s, sunglasses were a well-established fashion accessory, having accumulated numerous valuable meanings within Western visual culture: speed, technology, military power, celebrity, travel, glamour, and the outsider cool of black American jazzmen, beatniks, rap artists, cinematic gangsters, and femmes fatales. Subsequently, sunglasses became increasingly significant to fashion, providing lucrative licensing opportunities as well as creative potential to nuance clothes with desirable

Hussein Chalayan, Spring/Summer 1995

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Hussein Chalayan’s spring/summer 1995 collection, entitled “Temporary Interference,” was his second commercial collection. It contributed to establishing Chalayan not only as a fashion designer, but as a philosopher and artist for whom clothes are a medium for provoking questions and symbolizing complex notions about human ambition. With this collection, Chalayan explores man’s ill-fated attempts to elevate himself to the status of the divine. Helium-filled balloons pull full-length slip dresses

Tilda Swinton

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

Scottish actor, model, and muse Tilda Swinton was born in London in 1960. After graduating from Cambridge she began a career acting on stage, and later in film, winning an Academy Award for her performance in Michael Clayton. She has played muse to fashion designers and artists alike, collaborating on a collection for Viktor & Rolf (2003) and starring in a short film by fashion designer Hussein Chalayan (Absent Present, 2005). In recent years she has been the face of campaigns for designers inclu

Back to top
Results showing
1 - 25 of 226 (10 pages)
Page 1 of 10