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Computer-Aided Design for Knitwear

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Doug Ross at MIT coined the phrase “computer-aided design” in 1959.Douglas T. Ross, http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/projects/studentaut/ncworld/NCWorld_DR_photo.htm.CAD, by definition, is the use of computer technology as a tool to design products. The products that the programs design and create depend on the user. Specialized CAD programs are used by fashion designers, textile designers, industrial designers, architects, graphic designers, engineers, and a host of others. The list of creative u

Project Seven— Color Theory in Practice

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Nine—Illustrator: Paths to Fashion

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Eleven—Repeat Patterns in Illustrator

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Twelve—Illustrator: Photoshop and Filters

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Photoshop and Illustrator contrast with traditional media in their extreme predictability. Whereas this is normally to your advantage sometimes as a designer you might want some unexpected variation in the results. This is where Filters and Effects can come to your aid. With Filters and Effects you still have to think as a designer and use your individual creativity. Otherwise, an off-the-peg filter used artlessly can make your work look exactly like someone else’s who has used the same filter.

Project Thirteen—Illustrator: The Blob and Art Brushes

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Fourteen—Illustrator: Flats

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Fifteen—Illustrator: All the Trimmings

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

In this project you will:

Project Sixteen—Illustrator: Layout

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Without some underlying structure in a presentation, elements can jump about randomly distracting the viewer and thereby working against your desire to appear professional

Project Seventeen—Illustrator: Presentation

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Review

Sharing, Communication, and Output

Robert Hume

Source: Fashion and Textile Design with Photoshop and Illustrator. Professional Creative Practice, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book part

Virtual Appropriation

Melitta Baumeister

Source: Fashion Thinking. Creative Approaches to the Design Process, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The first two garments that Melitta constructed were derived from one jacket shape. The second piece was a bodysuit that had padding in the shape of the first jacket. The third and fourth outfits ‘copied’ each other in that the fourth used a jacket-shaped flock print on a transparent organza dress and the third used a shirt-shaped flock print on a transparent organza dress.

Cross-Platform Desktop Publishing

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Currently, there are two types of computer platforms, Mac and PC. Macintosh computers run on the Mac OS (Mac Operating System) and PCs run on the Windows operating system. One of these is loaded on the central processing unit (CPU) of your computer. Each platform has its benefits, but the major advantage of both is the ability to create and print right from your desk—a process known as desktop publishing.

Basic Vector Design Skills with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Chapter 2 introduces you to object-oriented vector graphics for both the Macintosh and PC platforms. The basic rendering features of Illustrator® will be explored through an overview of the Illustrator® desktop interface and software features. The information in this chapter and practice exercises will help you to become familiar with the program’s tools and panels, and assist you in learning to draw electronically. This chapter is just the foundation; you will become familiar with each important

Digital Fashion Illustration Foundation with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Chapter 3 reinforces the features of Illustrator® through three tutorials that will unfold more tools, panels, and functions of the program. The goal is to help you to further develop your command of the Illustrator® interface, and to improve your digital illustration capabilities through numbered step-by-step instructions. By completing the tutorials in this chapter, you will accomplish the following objectives:

Mastering Vector Tools for Apparel Design and Presentation

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapters 2 and 3 the basics of working with Illustrator® were emphasized. In this chapter, fashion apparel and accessory tutorials are used to teach digital apparel design and presentation techniques using Illustrator®. The tutorials in this chapter will also prepare you for rendering technical flats, jewelry, and accessories. Specific focus is given to:

Defining Prints and Patterns

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The subject of defining patterns is discussed and demonstrated throughout this book and is the focus of this chapter. In later chapters, even more textiles, treatments, and finishes will be covered.

Creating the Fashion Croquis with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Illustrator® possesses many features previously available only in Photoshop®. With practice, you can render male and female digital fashion figures that are parallel to or even superior to freehand fashion sketches. The effort might seem arduous at first, but the benefits are incalculable. You can reuse digital fashion figures and alter them in an infinite number of ways. This saves time and money.

Fashion Design Art with Illustrator® and Photoshop®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you will add depth and definition to your digital fashion croquis. Several tutorials are devoted to creating and enhancing apparel on male and female fashion figures by combining the effects of both Illustrator® and Photoshop®. After completing each tutorial in this chapter, you will understand how to:

“Digital Duo” Fashion Face and Hair

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Your studies in previous chapters should have helped you to develop a particular balance between the illustrative effects of Illustrator® and Photoshop®. This chapter tests your ability to transition between the programs as you learn to create facial characteristics and hairstyles for male and female fashion croquis.

Technical Design with Illustrator®

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In the apparel market, nearly all digital production flats are created with vector-based software programs like Illustrator®. The need to communicate with global resources and the fast pace of the garment center have nearly eclipsed the use of freehand technical flats for production.

“Digital Duo” Color Flats, Floats, Design, and Presentation

Stacy Stewart Smith

Source: CAD for Fashion Design and Merchandising, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The primary objective of this chapter is to teach you how to create exceptional 3-D digital color flats and floats from technical drawings. Therefore, the tutorials in Chapters 12, 13, and 14 should be completed before attempting the ones here. In fact, some of the technical flats presented in Chapter 14 will be enhanced in this one. This chapter also culminates all the lessons in the book, and reinforces the skills you will need to create a totally digital fashion portfolio presentation. In this

New Tools for the New Millennium: Fashion Images That Relate to the Technology of the Times

Jemi Armstrong, Lorrie Ivas and Wynn Armstrong

Source: From Pencil to Pen Tool. Understanding and Creating the Digital Fashion Image, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This chapter chronicles the late-twentieth century’s embrace of computer technology and explores several artistic leaders of the movement. It also reviews the work of those whose illustration styles can be generated and manipulated by Photoshop or Illustrator, whether software actually entered their creative processes.

Software Basics: Getting Started with Adobe Illustrator CS

Jemi Armstrong, Lorrie Ivas and Wynn Armstrong

Source: From Pencil to Pen Tool. Understanding and Creating the Digital Fashion Image, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Chapter 10 introduces the student to the core basics of the Adobe Illustrator CS environment. You will learn to set preferences, manage color settings, and utilize palettes and pull-down menus and commands. The basic toolbox functions are also covered in depth.

Mastering the Adobe Illustrator Pen Tool

Jemi Armstrong, Lorrie Ivas and Wynn Armstrong

Source: From Pencil to Pen Tool. Understanding and Creating the Digital Fashion Image, 2006, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Once you have learned Illustrator basics (see Chapter 10), the most important skill is mastering the Illustrator pen tool. Drawing effortlessly with the pen tool will allow design ideas to take precedent and free you from focusing on technology. We have included examples, such as a line sheet, to show the many uses for vectorized flats; however, many more possibilities do exist.

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