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Draping Principles and Skills

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Draping principles and skillsDraping is a technique in which DesignDesignersdesigners work with fabric, using a dress form or live model, draping and pinning the pieces together to develop the desired style. Draping is the oldest means of creating clothing. It is an art form in fabric. The techniques by which a designer works to develop a line may vary. Many designers prefer to use draping methods to create their original designs. This is because working with actual materials gives a designer gre

Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesBodice and blouse designsThe bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

Drapery, Bias, and Cowls

Steven Stipelman

Source: Illustrating Fashion. Concept to Creation, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Draped garments usually involve the direction of fabric called the bias. Fabric is woven with a crosswise and lengthwise direction. The bias is the diagonal direction extending across the grain of the fabric. The bias has a round, very elastic quality. It also has the ability to cling and fall and follow the curves of the body in a very sensual way.

The Skill of Couture Draping

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Grainline refers to the orientation of the yarns in a woven fabric. The lengthwise grains run along the length of the fabric and are called the warp yarns. The yarns that are woven in and out perpendicular to the warp yarns are called the weft yarns. These run side to side forming the cross grain of the fabric. The weft yarns are woven to form selvage on both sides of the fabric. The selvage is a finished edge that is formed by the weft yarns being woven, rotating side to side. (Figure 5.2)

Identifying Fashion Fabrics

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Bias and Bias Treatments

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Cowls

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Cowls can be draped with or without pleats/gathers and with few or many folds. Cowls can fall at varying depths, creating a soft look to any garment. Cowls are designed to fall from the shoulders, neckline, armholes, or waist of dresses, gowns, blouses, pants, jackets, and coats. With the help of a brooch or clip, the cowl can be pulled in any direction to create interesting design effects (see Design b in Figure 1).

Bias Cut Dresses and Twist

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Thanks to the innovative and creative mind of the late designer Madeleine Vionnet (1876– 1975), who was called the “Euclid or Sphinx of Fashion,” bias cut clothing revolutionized the way women wore clothes. To the relief of the fashion world, the girdle was not a part of this new style. The effect of the bias cut dress was dramatic and pleasing to the eye, ever clinging to the natural curves of the figure before falling from the hip into flares at the hemline. The beauty of the bias dress was in

Patterns for Fabric Used on the Bias Grainline

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

True bias was introduced in Chapter 1. There, it was explained that the true bias grainline on fabric is at a 45-degree angle to the straight grain or the cross grain. When a garment is cut with the true bias grainline running up and down the body, the garment will stretch and cling to the body. This is one way to make garments fit a wider range of figure types, but it uses more fabric per garment. It may also be difficult to sew a bias-cut garment without producing ripples or stress lines on the

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