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Context

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Pattern cutting computers in,Deconstruction,Blocks,Pattern, defined,A pattern can be described as a two-dimensional representation of a three-dimensional object. In clothing, this would usually take the form of a front and back set of pattern shapes that, when cut in cloth and made up, form the garment. There are many ways to create a pattern, but the conventional way would be to use a set of blocks of a specific size to represent fundamental shapes and sections of the body (such as the bodice, s

Pattern Fundamentals

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts,Blocks,skirt,Blocks,Measurements from the body are used to create flat 2D templates called blocks. These represent the body shape in its simplest form. These blocks are referred to as basic blocks because more developed shapes created by designers and manufacturers can be created over time, and successful shapes can become blocks from which seasonal collections can be developed.

Shape

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Darts,in design,Fashion design is design for the body. The body will carry the design, and the garment will reveal the curves of the body or use the body to support its structure.

Sleeves, Collars and Circles

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar Eton,fundamentals,With a unique sleeve design, and no other design features, a garment can look extraordinary. Sleeves are an important part of pattern cutting; the pattern cutter must be sensitive to this – after all, the exact length and angle of a shoulder line could be critical to the designer's ‘handwriting’ of the season. A pattern cutter must also consider the best type, shape and fit of sleeve to express the design. There is a distinct relationship between shoulder and sleeve, and

Trousers

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Collar Eton,fundamentals,The idea that women were once ‘not allowed’ to wear trousers seems ridiculous now. Although women began to wear trousers early on in the twentieth century, it was really Yves Saint Laurent who made trousers chic and highly fashionable, along with his reworking of ‘the smoking jacket’. Trousers were the domain of male attire as much as skirts were the domain of female attire. In particular, this gendering of clothing was somewhat erased when jeans were adopted by men and w

Pockets, Openings and Finishes

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The way a garment is finished is determined by price, fabric and design, so, for example, if a facing was used, it would give a crisp clean finish without the need for topstitching, but a design in fabric, such as fine silk, chiffon or cotton, may be better finished with a bias fabric binding.

Sustainability and Fashion

Pat Parish

Source: Pattern Cutting. The Architecture of Fashion, 2nd Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Waste,Consumption,We presently face much debate about the depletion of the earth's resources and issues such as ‘peak oil’ and the consequences of global warming. Whatever the truth, we cannot blindly continue without considering ways to minimize the impact we are making on the earth.

Pattern Cutting

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

This is the point at which pattern cutting becomes much more creative and exciting. Once the design has been completed, the process of breathing life into a flat design drawing in order to achieve an actual garment can begin. To be able to achieve a beautiful garment shape takes time and experience. Remember, nothing ever happens without practicing your skills—don’t be disheartened if it doesn’t work first time round. All outstanding fashion designers and creative pattern cutters have worked for

What You Need to Sew and Overlock Knits

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In general, the term “laying out the fabric” refers to the positioning of the pattern pieces onto the fabric (Figure 2.1). In production a marker is created that indicates the layout of the pattern pieces and is used as a guide for cutting the fabric for production. The pattern layout can be done manually or on a computer and helps to estimate the amount of yardage required. Pattern pieces are arranged to take into consideration three aspects of the fabric: structure, design, and width. The patt

Method To This Madness

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Layout and Cutting

Roberto Cabrera and Denis Antoine

Source: Classic Tailoring Techniques for Menswear. A Construction Guide, 2nd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Junya Watanabe

Stephanie Edith Herold

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

A Stylish History of Jazz: 1900–1960

Alphonso D. McClendon

Source: Fashion and Jazz. Dress, identity and subcultural improvisation, 2015, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

jazzorigins ofNew Orleansslave performancesBechet, Sidneyon slave performances/New Orleansartinfluence of AfricanAfrican ritualsAfrican art/dressDecades before the Civil War, a gathering of inspired people seeking self-determination initiated the birth of a musical genre that flourished throughout America. Congo SquareCongo Square in New Orleans, Louisiana is the highly renowned ground where slaves gathered for spiritual communion on free Sunday. By 1800, these assemblies swelled to six hundred i

Fabrics and Cutting

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Finishes

John Lau

Source: Basics Fashion Design 09: Designing Accessories. Exploring the design and construction of bags, shoes, hats and jewellery, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Hand finishing is labour-intensive and costly, but produces results that are difficult to replicate. One person, or a team of people, might spend hundreds of hours completing just one accessory. Techniques traditionally used to embellish quality pieces continue to be employed today because of the ongoing demand for special and unique accessories. Intricate and detailed surface finishes, in both flat and three-dimensional forms, are frequently found in high-end accessories, as we shall explore fur

The Pattern Industry

Carol Anne Dickson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. The United States and Canada, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

The pattern industry in the United States and Canada had as its antecedents a number of earlier attempts to simplify the making of garments. The first patterns, made by cloistered monks, consisted of only two pieces. In the thirteenth century, French master tailor Charles Daillac began making his patterns out of thin pieces of wood. In the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries, fashion journals began to appear, illustrating and describing the increasingly complex fashions of the times. In

Patterns and Pattern Making

Joy Spanabel Emery

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

In the United States, Godey’s sold full-scale patterns by Mme Demorest through mail order in 1854. Frank Leslie’s Gazette of Fashions included full-scale, foldout Demorest patterns in the monthly periodical as well as offering patterns by mail. The patterns were one size only. Because they were offered through retail or mail order, Demorest patterns were the first commercial patterns in the United States (Emery, p. 1999). They offered a wide range of ladies, children’s, and men’s tissue-paper pat

Production

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Intern, 2nd Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

A flowchart of the production or manufacturing process as it relates to the various sectors of the fashion industry is shown as Figure 11.2. Next is an examination of the actual manufacturing steps, from development of the production pattern to distribution of the finished product. At the end of this chapter, costing activities for the various steps are presented.

The Structure and Form of European Clothes

Peter McNeil

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Clothing is both a material covering and an enclosure for the body that in West Europe is generally constructed through draping or cutting cloth or through weaving or knitting it to shape. The structure of European dress is also bound up with abstract ideals of conduct and beauty. The aesthetic and phenomenological dimension of clothing moving in space is also significant. Some fashions such as women’s court dress from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were designed to be “read” from a fro

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