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Bodice and Blouse Designs

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesBodice and blouse designsThe bodice and blouse designs in this group are kept simple and natural while the fabric is draped with the correct amount of ease and proportion. Projects explore how to release and manipulate the fabric into a design. Each design defines the style and silhouette over the bust, hip, and waist by emphasizing the use of folds, darts, pleats, fullness, empire seams, and halters, and at the same time, not overworking the fabric.

Designing with Circular Flounces and Ruffles

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: The Art of Fashion Draping, 5th Edition, 2018, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Bodice and blouse designsobjectivesFlounces, circulargathered ruffles andRufflesFlounces, circularFlounces, circulardesignsDesigns with a circular flounce are the stuff of romance. Flounces recall a mood of elegance with a rich, dramatic, graceful flare.

Construction

Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale

Source: The Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Before we can talk about the methods for constructing garments, we must first look at the array of tools and heavy-duty machinery involved in the process of construction. Listed below are some of the key tools.

Creating Texture with Pleats, Tucks, Gathers, Ruffles, and Trims

Sharon Czachor

Source: Sewing with Knits and Stretch Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A variety of knit and stretch woven fabrics used throughout the text have been cut into sample sizes to stitch these techniques. Purchase additional yardage as assigned by the instructor or spurred by curiosity of the designer, ¼ yard minimum. Elastic ⅛″ and ¼″, fusible interfacing, hand sewing thread and needles, and a loop turner are all supplies used in previous chapters. Other supplies will be listed with each technique.

The Skill of Fabric Manipulation

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Appliqués are cutout fabric, lace, or cutwork shapes applied to the garment. They are attached on by hand, machine, or with heat.

Stitches

Connie Amaden-Crawford

Source: A Guide to Fashion Sewing, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

By studying the information in this chapter, the designer will be able to:

Garment Construction Details

Janace E. Bubonia

Source: Apparel Quality. A Guide To Evaluating Sewn Products, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

When it comes to purchasing apparel, consumers look for garments that are flattering on their figure. The way a garment fits is just as important as the styling of the design. Fit is the relationship between the body and the size and styling of a garment. A properly fitting garment should provide a smooth appearance that is free of wrinkling, bulging, or sagging and should effectively function for its intended use to provide comfort for the wearer. A poorly fitting garment can make any design und

Styles, Lines, and Details for Shape and Fit

Jaeil Lee and Camille Steen

Source: Technical Sourcebook for Designers, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

After studying this chapter, you will be able to:

Manipulating Dart Excess and Adding Fullness

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The basic dart has creative value when draped as clusters, curved, asymmetric, or as intersecting darts, to name a few. The dart excess, when used creatively, is referred to as a dart equivalent. The following list includes by no means the only design possibilities:

Skirt

Helen Joseph-Armstrong

Source: Draping for Apparel Design, 3rd Edition, 2013, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

The amount of deviation from the basic straight-line skirt determines the new silhouette. Four skirt prototypes are identified by their silhouettes and are the basis for an infinite number of designs; these include the straight, or rectangle; the A-line, or triangle; the peg, or inverted triangle; and the bell silhouettes.

High-End Rendering Techniques

Bina Abling

Source: Fashion Sketchbook, 6th Edition, 2012, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Ruffles are sewn in a strip or band of fabric gathered into a bunch of folds that are held in place by a seam. The opposite side is the hemline of the ruffle. It rolls, curls, and pops with the drape of the ruffle depending on its direction—up, down, or sideways. The difference between a ruffle and a flounce is that a flounce does not have gathers.

Dart-Equivalent Bodice Styles

Sally M. Di Marco

Photography by Erika Yuille

Computer-Assisted Drawings and Draping by Katarina Kozarova

Source: Draping Basics, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Other variations of the foundation bodice can be created by converting the dart excess of the fitting darts to dart equivalents. The dart-equivalent bodice styles presented in this chapter— such as the gathered waist bodice, flange dart bodice, and the princess bodice— are accomplished by converting the dart excess to gathers, open-end darts, or shaped seamlines, without changing the fit of the pattern. The dart excess can also be draped as dart-equivalent tucks, flares, pleats, or fully released

Bodice Seamlines and Fullness

Nora M. MacDonald

Source: Principles of Flat-Pattern Design, 4th Edition, 2010, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Dart-equivalent seamlines are fitting lines that must point to, extend to, or cross over the pivot point to replace normal fitting darts. They provide shape and add design to the garment. Dart-equivalent seams may extend from one edge of the pattern to the other or incorporate the dart fold, only. They can cross the pattern in any direction, that is, vertically, horizontally, or diagonally; and, they can be any shape, such as straight, curved, or jagged.

Dart Equivalents As Stylelines, Gathers, Pleats, and Release Tucks

Lori A. Knowles

Source: The Practical Guide to Patternmaking for Fashion Designers: Juniors, Misses, and Women, 2005, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Figure 8.1

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