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Getting Started

Anette Fischer and Kiran Gobin

Source: Construction for Fashion Design, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Working with the right tools will make block and pattern construction easier. These are just some of the key pieces of equipment required.

Translating Concept to Product

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“Ideas are magical only when they become real and can be appreciated and analyzed. A sketch translated into a sample garment is the realization of an idea. But it becomes complete only when the garment unites with a body moving in space.”

Sizing and Fit Specifications

Sandra Keiser, Deborah Vandermar and Myrna B. Garner

Source: Beyond Design. The Synergy of Apparel Product Development, 4th Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

“In analyzing how my competitors communicate fit, I saw a place, an opportunity where we could first use models that have more average size figures and also develop a size chart that is easily understandable . . . I want to gain trust and loyalty with our customer base.”

The Knit Family of Slopers

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The sloper system is a method of creating slopers for drafting patterns for garments constructed from stretch knit fabrics. As previously discussed in Chapter 1, in the “How Working with Knits Differs from Working with Wovens” section, slopers for woven fabrics (incorporating dart and ease) cannot be used to draft the patterns for stretch knit fabrics. Stretch knit garments require unique slopers that do not have darts or ease incorporated into the slopers. The fabric’s stretch replaces the darts

Pattern Drafting for Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Working with the right tools makes the pattern drafting process easier. The essential patternmaking tools are illustrated in Figure 3.1. Figures 3.2 and 3.3 illustrates where to use each tool when drafting patterns.

Laying Out, Cutting, and Stitching Knits

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

An L-square ruler and a tape measure are required tools you need for laying out and cutting knits. The remaining tools you need are as follows (see also Figure 4.1):

Drafting the Hip and Top Foundations

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before you draft hip and top foundations, it is important to have the patternmaking tools required and an understanding of the terminology of the pattern drafting techniques outlined in Chapter 3.

Top Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter you make a set of top slopers to match each stretch category. You also draft and grade a sleeve sloper into each stretch category to fit the armholes (armscye) of the top slopers.

Dress Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A dress-piece is a partial pattern extending from the hipline to knee length in each stretch category. Table 2.2 on p. 17 indicates that dresses are drafted from the top slopers. You add the dress-piece to the hipline of the top slopers to create the dress slopers.

Jacket, Cardigan, Sweater, and Sweater-Jacket Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you develop slopers for jackets, cardigans, and sweater-jackets. They can be fitted, loose-fit, or oversized. You must use the appropriate slopers to suit the type of knit, style, and fit you envision for your design. Fitted and loose-fit cardigan muslins have been cut, stitched, and placed on the form in Figures 8.3 and 8.4. For the opening, a 1” extension is added to the center front.

Skirt Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you create a set of skirt slopers from the two-way stretch hip foundations that were drafted in Chapter 5. Refer to Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the hip foundation transforms into a skirt sloper. The “Skirt Sloper” is part of the knit family of slopers in Table 2.2 on p. 17.

Pant Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In this chapter, you learn how to draft a set of pant slopers in each stretch category (minimal stretch, moderate stretch, very stretchy, and super stretchy). You create the pant slopers from the hip foundation that was drafted in Chapter 5. Look back at the Knit Family in Table 2.1 on p. 16 to see how the slopers for pants evolve. In addition, Table 2.2 lists other pant variations that you can draft from the pant slopers.

Lingerie Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Before drafting patterns for lingerie, determine the stretch capacity of the knit you plan to work with using the stretch gauge in Figure 1.6 on p. 9. Then choose the appropriate stretch category of top slopers to draft the patterns. There are two ways the slopers can be selected. The first way is to use the slopers that match the stretchiness of your chosen knit. The second way is to choose a different sloper to create a roomier fit with more ease. (Refer to “How to Choose Slopers” in Chapter 2

Swimwear Slopers and Patterns

Julie Cole

Source: Patternmaking with Stretch Knit Fabrics, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A swimsuit is a close-fitting article of clothing used for swimming and sunbathing. It can be one piece or a two-piece bra and panty ensemble. A swimsuit needs to be practical and wearable, and it must stay secure at all times to be swim-ready. To accomplish this, you need to purchase the correct supplies.

Grading

Paula J. Myers-McDevitt

Source: Complete Guide to Size Specification and Technical Design, 3rd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A sample garment, once approved for production, is graded or converted into all of the other sizes that will be produced. In other words, each piece of the approved pattern is made either smaller or larger (graded) to achieve the rest of the patterns in that size range. Every point is given a grade rule. For example, a top evaluated and approved in a size medium must then be converted to sizes small, large, and extra large, the points of measure are marked, the grade rules are applied, and then m

The Secret of the Corset

Zoya Nudelman

Source: The Art of Couture Sewing, 2nd Edition, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

As previously noted, a corset understructure (also called a boned bodice) serves as a foundation for strapless dresses, gowns, and tops. The boned bodice must be made out of tough and firm fabric and interfaced when additional support is necessary. The best way to make a great pattern for a boned bodice is to drape it.

Zero waste fashion design and CAD

Timo Rissanen and Holly McQuillan (eds)

Source: Zero Waste Fashion Design, 2016, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

So far the discussion has contextualized pattern cutting as designing, but in zero waste fashion design marker making is also an integral part of design activity. Conventionally the process of marker making occurs after design and pattern cutting, often by someone far removed from the designer or pattern cutter, resulting in oddly shaped spaces between pieces, which are often unusable. However, by understanding marker making as a design activity, the opportunities for design and waste reduction a

Production

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Depending on the size of the company, a product manager, or product design manager, may be responsible for all of the products within a company’s product line in a small firm, or for a specific product category in a line for a large company. Product managers often work with one foot in the creative part of the business and the other foot in the production part of the business. On the creative, design-focused side, product managers monitor market and fashion trends related to their assigned produc

Designing Apparel and Accessories for the Manufacturer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Working as a fashion designer, an artist dedicated to the creation of apparel and accessories, can mean supervising a team of design assistants, working under the label of a big-name designer or manufacturer, freelancing for a line or group of lines, or designing and producing a line under your own name. Although the first two options may not appear to be as alluring as the others, they may be less stressful and, quite possibly, more lucrative. Designing and manufacturing your own label takes a g

Product Development by the Manufacturer and Retailer

Michele M. Granger

Source: The Fashion Industry and Its Careers: An Introduction, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Manufacturers that offer product development to retailers provide innovation, flexibility, and cost control for retailers. Many are responsible for a traditional manufacturer’s tasks, such as bringing innovative fabrics to the retailer or producing garments from a product sample; however, others may be expected to work closely with the retailer’s strategic plans to build products that are best suited for creating customer/brand familiarity—from start to finish. Some product development teams empl

Pattern Grading Fundamentals

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Pattern grading is the process of systematically increasing and decreasing the dimensions of a master-size pattern into a range of sizes for production. Due to cost constraints, one sample-size pattern is developed and fitted, and then other sizes are graded from this master pattern. The purpose of the grading process is to achieve a good fit in each size of the garment without changing the style sense (proportion and balance) of the garment design from the master-size pattern (Solinger, 1988). H

Understanding a Grading System

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

A grading system consists of a grade guide and grade distributions (Figure 2.1). These two components are developed based on the identified target customer and anthropometric data. The first and second edition of this textbook developed a simplified grading system based on the PS 42-70 data. This data was publically available and contained numerous points of measurements. In this third edition, the text will work from the concept of developing a grading system and not any particular data. In Chap

Manual Grading on the Cartesian Graph

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

In Chapter 2, the concepts of grading were explained. Once the concepts are understood, the application of those concepts to grade a pattern can be performed. Regardless of the method used for pattern grading—manual grading or computer grading—pattern movement within a Cartesian graph can be applied. Therefore, understanding what a Cartesian graph is and how to use it are essential concepts in being able to grade with and without a computer.

Computer Grading

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

Pattern grading on the computer is accurate and efficient. This is the method used almost exclusively by the industry, and it was one of the first skills computerized for pattern development. As explained in Chapter 3, grading a pattern using a Cartesian graph is simple x,y movements. Computerizing the mathematical differences between garment sizes and plotting those from a reference point can be done quickly using various software programs. However, errors are compounded faster in computer gradi

Grading the Basic Pattern Blocks

Kathy K. Mullet

Source: Concepts of Pattern Grading. Techniques for Manual and Computer Grading, 3rd Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

How to grade the basic block patterns is the most important skill in pattern grading. Because flat patternmaking is based on the use and manipulation of the basic sloper to create other apparel designs, learning to grade the basic block patterns will enable the designer to grade any other design that he or she creates. Learning where the grade is distributed in the basic pattern is imperative to grading other designs. The principles and concepts learned in this chapter will be applied in all of t

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