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Knitting Methods

Lisa Donofrio-Ferrezza and Marilyn Hefferen

Source: Designing a Knitwear Collection. From Inspiration to Finished Garments, 2nd Edition, 2017, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

The variety of knitting methods and machines available today is plentiful. The newest technologies and machines are capable of producing complex pattern designs and silhouettes through their ability to increase, decrease, and transfer stitches seamlessly. All weft-knitting machines, whether single-bed, double-bed, or the newer electronic systems with slide beds, have the capacity to knit, tuck, and miss stitches. All of these methods are the techniques used to manipulate loops and stitches in ord

Shape/Volume

Lucy Adjoa Armah

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

To fully understand the significance of “volume” in fashion, it is necessary to discuss everything from the exaggerated shoulders in the trend for tailored power dressing in the 1980s to the unconventional draping and pleating of Issey Miyake. The prism of volume enables the unpacking of aesthetic traditions in dress and fashion that appear to have little in common. When designers utilize volume, they are often presenting a fantasy from a distant land or a reimagined time. When individuals choose

Dress and the Arts

Joanne B. Eicher and Sandra Lee Evenson

Source: The Visible Self. Global Perspectives on Dress, Culture, and Society, 4th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

At the conclusion of this chapter, you will be able to:

Guy Laroche

Matina Kousidi

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Marithé + François Girbaud (house)

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

Issey Miyake, Spring/Summer 1994

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Article

A few months after winning France’s prestigious Légion d’Honneur, and the worldwide launch of his highly successful fragrance, Miyake’s spring/summer 1994 collection presented a number of his existing clothing lines alongside his high-end namesake line, Issey Miyake. In a season with a strong emphasis on the body, Miyake’s runway show presented the body in motion—focusing less on the body itself than on the effect of movement created in the clothes. This kind of higher-concept presentation from M

Issey Miyake

Emily M. Orr

Source: Fashion Photography Archive, 2015, Fashion Photography Archive

Designer Biography

The Eighties and the Nineties: Fragmentation of Fashion 1980–1999

Phyllis G. Tortora and Sara B. Marcketti

Source: Survey of Historic Costume, 6th Edition, 2015, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter + STUDIO

During the 1980s and 1990s, fashion choices were plentiful as a spirit of “anything goes” prevailed. Technology allowed the world to become increasingly connected.

Textiles and the Collection

Erin Cadigan

Source: Sourcing and Selecting Textiles for Fashion, 2014, Fairchild Books Library

Book chapter

Design is the method of putting form and content together. Design, just as art, has multiple definitions; there is no single definition. Design can be art. Design can be aesthetics. Design is so simple, that’s why it is so complicated.

Issey Miyake

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo, 2011, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Clothes … speak many languages … and have to be seen on the outside … as well as felt on the inside.

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Japanese Fashion*

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

During the Taisho period (1912–1926), wearing Western clothing continued to be a symbol of sophistication and an expression of modernity. It was in this period that working women such as bus conductors, nurses, and typists started wearing Western clothes in everyday life. By the beginning of the Showa period (1926–1989), men’s clothing had become largely Western, and by this time, the business suit was gradually becoming standard apparel for company employees. It took about a century for Western

Miyake, Issey

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Miyake laid the foundation in Paris for avant-garde designers worldwide, the Japanese ones in particular. He was showing in Paris long before other Japanese designers, and his presence was further pronounced by the emergence of two influential, norm-breaking designers. Rei Kawakubo, working under the label Comme des Garçons, and Yohji Yamamoto began to present their collections in Paris in 1981 along with the already-established Miyake, who is considered the founding father of the new fashion tre

Design Innovation by Japanese Designers Miyake, Kawakubo, and Yamamoto

Sandhya Lalloo-Morar

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia, 2010, Berg Fashion Library

Encyclopedia entry

Rarely has a concept in clothing design attracted the sort of dread and hysteria that deconstruction has incited since its inception in 1967. Deconstruction can be described as the literal dismantling of clothes in order to destroy fashion. The philosophy was aimed at un-building the constructs of a culture inherited from previous generations.Japanese designers Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto, and Rei Kawakubo have been widely regarded as innovators in the fashion world and leading exponents of deco

Type 2: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, and Yohji Yamamoto Construction of the Japanese Avant-Garde Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture, 2004, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

Miyake was born in Hiroshima in 1939, the same year as Kenzo. Unlike Kenzo and Yamamoto who formally studied fashion at Bunka School of Fashion, Miyake graduated from one of art universities, Tama University, where he majored in graphic design. In 1965, after graduating from Tama, he went to Paris, three months after Kenzo. They knew each other in Tokyo (Quinn 1984: 12), and both studied tailoring and dressmaking at l’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture for a year. In 1966, he landed an a

Seven: Japanese Innovation

Bradley Quinn

Source: Techno Fashion, 2002, Berg Fashion Library

Book chapter

‘Body becomes dress becomes body,’ proclaimed Rei Kawakubo, as she tried to sum up her radical perception of clothes and their function.Rei Kawakubo was interviewed by Susannah Frankel in her book, Fashion Visionaries (2001), London: V&A Publications, p. 154. Blurring the boundaries between dress and the body itself is typical for her; it has been central to her work for three decades. Ever since she made her debut in Paris her enigmatic and provocative collections have sent shock waves resonatin

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