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Hermès

Lauren Bowes

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Striptease

Barbara Brownie

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Striptease is a public performance of the otherwise private act of undressing. It is characterized by its emphasis on clothes, rather than the body beneath. As a demonstration of transformation, striptease highlights the capacity for clothes to conceal and reveal what lies beneath, be it a naked body or another layer of cloth. Catwalk shows make regular use of elements of striptease, layering garments so that ensembles can be revealed piece by piece. More overt references to erotic striptease are

Breton Stripe Shirt, Jean Paul Gaultier, 1997

Lorynn Divita

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Throughout Jean Paul Gaultier’s career he has created a recognizable body of work based on iconic looks including trench coats, corsets, and berets, among others. But first and foremost, Gaultier has come to be permanently associated with the Breton stripe top, also known as la marinière, or a “sailor” top. From its origins as a staple of the sailor’s uniform in the Bretagne region of France, then in the entire French navy, the shirt has retained an aura of romance and simplicity that has appeale

Russian Style

Waleria Dorogova

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Manifestations of the Russian style are a recurring motif in the vocabulary of Western fashion. Their spectrum ranges from rural peasant dresses to opulent, zibeline-edged Boyar coats and covers many stereotypes of equally Tsarist and Soviet Russia. Despite the fact that the Soviet Union existed as a hermetically closed entity, culturally isolated from Europe, French fashion repeatedly featured a Russian note. The second half of the 1960s experienced the popularity of the Zhivago look, while Yves

Jean Paul Gaultier Menswear, Fall/Winter 1989

Tony Glenville

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

It is firstly important to put Gaultier within the context of his times. From the first catwalk show he was considered an “enfant terrible” yet at the same time a superb craftsman, and a designer who acknowledged the history and heritage of French fashion. His view of the world was from Paris and however much time he spent time in London and declared his admiration for London club culture and youthful attitudes to style, he remains a designer whose reference points span Madame Grès to Barbès Roch

African Influences in European Fashion Design

Elizabeth Kutesko

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Since the late nineteenth century, European fashion design has been lured by the exotic “otherness” of Africa as a source of creative inspiration and exotic raw materials, such as ivory and tropical woods, for use in luxury consumer goods. The more recent stylistic appropriation, since the 1970s, of African motifs, patterns, and color combinations has became increasingly prominent in European fashion and needs to be understood as part of the industry’s continual cross-cultural pursuit of innovati

Fashion and Surrealism

Victoria Rose Pass

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Surrealism, as an artistic movement, emerged in Paris in 1924 with the publication of the Surrealist Manifesto by the writer André Breton (1896–1966), but artists and writers had exhibited this sensibility long before. The notion of the uncanny is at the heart of surrealism. At its most basic, the aesthetic of the uncanny celebrates the beauty of combining images which are irreconcilable: the real and the imagined, the live and the dead, the organic and the inorganic. The uncanny is also at the c

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

Gaultier, Jean-Paul

Xavier Chaumette

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Steampunk

Sandra J. Ley

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. Global Perspectives 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In the late 1980s, a literary subgenre emerged from science fiction and fantasy. Set in an alternate history of the nineteenth century, this subgenre is described as steampunk, a term coined in 1987 by author K. W. Jeter as a tongue-in-cheek analogy with cyberpunk. Both literary genres turn out cautionary tales of the perils of technology in the hands of the unscrupulous. Yet while cyberpunk looks with trepidation toward a dystopian future dominated by advanced technology, steampunk looks backwar

Yohji Yamamoto: The Secret Sewn in

Barbara Vinken

Translated by Mark Hewson

Source: Fashion Zeitgeist. Trends and Cycles in the Fashion System 2005

Book chapter

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