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Sid Vicious and the Sex Pistols

José Blanco F.

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The British band Sex Pistols are the quintessential London punk band: they defined British punk better than any other artist did. Although punk rock was heralded as antiestablishment and promoting anarchy, Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood carefully orchestrated the appearance and styling of the Sex Pistols. Sid Vicious joined the band in 1977 to replace Glen Matlock. As guitarist and vocalist, Vicious became a de facto leading man for the band. Along with bandmate Johnny Rotten (John Lydon),

Vivienne Westwood, “On Liberty,” Fall/Winter 1994

Lydia Edwards

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

“My job, more than anything, is to idealize women,” Vivienne Westwood has said of her work, including the fall/winter collection “On Liberty,” which premiered in Paris in 1994. Her appropriation of historic styles is well known, but in this collection a reinvention of the bustle, the nineteenth-century skirt support that accented a woman’s behind and allowed for elaborate skirt drapery, is more fluid than similar iterations have been. Westwood’s stark wire cage from 1990, for instance, was not so

Vivienne Westwood’s Elevated Ghillie Shoes from 1993

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

For her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” collection, Vivienne Westwood perched her models on extremely elevated platform shoes. Inspired, as most of her collection, by Scottish traditional garments, the platform shoes reinterpreted ancestral ghillies worn for folkloric dances. However, apart from the lacing structure, the shoes were more reminiscent of fetish footwear—an aesthetic typical of Vivienne Westwood’s taste for combining conservatism with subversiveness. When the British designer rein

Vivienne Westwood, “Anglomania,” Fall/Winter 1993–1994

Hayley-Jane Edwards-Dujardin

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

From being queen of punk in the mid-1970s, Vivienne Westwood slightly moved, from the 1980s, to being a supporter of British fashion’s establishment. Inspired by traditional craftsmanship and eighteenth-century art, the designer has since infused her collections with historicism. With her fall/winter 1993–1994 “Anglomania” show, Vivienne Westwood epitomized her interest in English and Scottish traditions while mingling masculine tailoring with outrageously feminine forms. Featuring laced bodices,

Tartan

Jonathan Faiers

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

The fabric that’s never out of fashion; tartan is indelibly associated with punk and Vivienne Westwood, but its use in fashion reaches much farther back, to its peak of popularity in the nineteenth century, and forward via Alexander McQueen and on into many of today’s most memorable collections. At once traditional and revolutionary, conservative and subversive, tartan is genderless, instantly recognizable, and infinitely adaptable. Beloved as much by Japanese, European, and American designers as

Vivienne Westwood, Red Label, Fall/Winter 1999

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Quirky, colorful, and colliding: with its juxtaposed styles, influences, and prints, Westwood created a discordant harmony in her fall/winter Red Label collection of 1999. It was the sixth collection that Westwood had produced for her Red Label line, and it was a rapid departure from those of other designers that season. Among Westwood’s peers, the key trends were plain fabrics and creamy, muted colors; Westwood clashed brights, checks, and prints. In contrast to the clean, understated, minimalis

Vivienne Westwood, Spring/Summer 1993

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Based on a thorough and careful understanding of fashion history and its great designers, yet delivered with bold, bright colors, extravagant accessories, and even nudity, Vivienne Westwood’s collection for spring/summer 1993 demonstrates her nuanced mastery of her art. The collection was shown in Le Grand Hôtel, Paris: the first time Westwood had used this location, where she would go on to host several further shows.

Vivienne Westwood, Spring/Summer 1984

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Models raise their hands in the air as victorious athletes. The stripes that accent their clothing increase the perception of speed and movement as they walk the catwalk, sportily kicking the air as they traverse. Vivienne Westwood’s spring/summer collection of 1984 was named after the ancient Greek personification of sleep, Hypnos, yet deliberately contrasted its namesake with bold, illuminating, and awakening flashes of neon, in a gesture of defiance that is typical of Westwood’s oeuvre.

Vivienne Westwood, Spring/Summer 1997

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Coquettish glances, provocative poses, and flashes of nudity: Vivienne Westwood’s “Vive la Bagatelle” collection for spring/summer 1997 mixed signature styles from the brand’s heritage with her trademark sense of fun and humor, and presented them with a renewed emphasis on flirtatious sexuality.

Vivienne Westwood

Aimee Scott

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Branding, Fashion and Music

Janice Miller

Source: Fashion and Music 2011

Book chapter

A kind of special status for creative people is part of a set of characteristics constructed in the nineteenth century by the writers, poets, composers and painters that Raymond Williams (1971) labels the ‘Romantic Artists’. Williams argues that a certain mystique and an almost stereotypical artistic personality were created by and around sets of individuals as a method of resistance to encroaching industrialization.

Tweed

Fiona Anderson

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Tweed cloth originated in Scotland in the early nineteenth century. At that time, it was only made from woolen yarns in the twill weave. From the 1820s to the present, tweed has been characterized by a huge range of color and weave effects. The main account given for the origins of the name tweed is that it is based on a misreading of the Scottish word tweel or twill (which was the weave characteristic of Scottish woolens at that time) for tweed. By the 1840s, tweed was established as a term used

Westwood, Vivienne*

Rebecca Arnold

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual Media and Dress

Stella Bruzzi and Pamela Gibson Church

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Visual media have played an enormous role in the development of fashion in West Europe. Fashion imagery emerged within print journalism, more specifically women’s magazines, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The development of popular cinema in the first half of the twentieth century had a momentous impact on the global fashion industry, especially in the star system, the “tie-in,” and the involvement of both couturiers and ready-to-wear designers in film. From the radical changes of th

England

Naomi E.A. Tarrant

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

In 1800, the people of England dressed in the general West European clothing style that was worn by all fashionable people. Wealth determined what a person could afford to wear but not the style. There was no folk dress, so the general impression was that wealthy people wore the same styles as their workers, with only the quality showing the difference. The poor acquired garments from secondhand clothes dealers or as gifts from wealthier family members or friends, charities, and employers, as wel

All Change Aboard the Fashion Express

L. Alison Goodrum

Source: The National Fabric. Fashion, Britishness, Globalization 2005

Book chapter

Just what is this thing called British fashion? From Peter York’s punk and pageantry to Michael Frayn’s herbivores and carnivores the schizophrenic nature of all things British is frequently – and hotly – debated. When we turn to one of British fashion’s most notorious designers of contemporary years, Vivienne Westwood, the remarkably varied and often contradictory character of the national fashion scene begins to surface. Even the briefest of biopics on Vivienne Westwood, chief executive and cre

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