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Hip-Hop

Shayla Corinne Black

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Hip-hop is a multifaceted genre of twentieth-century music, whose influence has expanded from the streets to the runway. It is a global phenomenon embraced by millions. Hip-hop began in the Bronx, New York and was forged by black youth as a form of artistic expression. Groups like Run-D.M.C. were iconic with their trademarks: Adidas sneakers, tracksuits, bucket hats, and gold rope chains. The fashion world avidly participated by appropriating the bright colors, athletic wear, loose-fitting garmen

Koji Tatsuno

Elizabeth Glendinning

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Yohji Yamamoto

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Costume National

Shari Sims

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Designer Biography

Yohji Yamamoto

Bonnie English

Source: Japanese Fashion Designers. The Work and Influence of Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo 2011

Book chapter

Yamamoto and Kawakubo brought the beauty of poverty to the most glamorous stage of the world—the catwalks of Paris. In their 1981 joint collection, they paraded garments which symbolized neediness, destitution and hardship—clothing that appeared to have been picked up from rag-bags. They were entirely black in colour and irregular in shape, with oddly positioned pockets and fastenings. Their size appeared voluminous, as if the space between the external garment and the body had been exaggerated,

East Asian Fashion Designers in Local and International Markets

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. East Asia 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Fashion is often equated with modern European high fashion, and since it is normally seen as a specifically Western development, its role in the creation of style by non-Western designers, especially by East Asian designers, used to be generally unrecognized and ignored. East Asians started to adopt a Western style of dress only recently. Western clothing and fashion appeared in Japan during the Meiji era (1868–1912), and it was a desired symbol of modernization encouraged by Emperor Meiji. Almos

Japanese Fashion*

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

During the Taisho period (1912–1926), wearing Western clothing continued to be a symbol of sophistication and an expression of modernity. It was in this period that working women such as bus conductors, nurses, and typists started wearing Western clothes in everyday life. By the beginning of the Showa period (1926–1989), men’s clothing had become largely Western, and by this time, the business suit was gradually becoming standard apparel for company employees. It took about a century for Western

Gender

Gertrud Lehnert

Source: Berg Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion. West Europe 2010

Encyclopedia entry

The basic distinction between female and male dress in the Western world is between women’s skirts and men’s bifurcated trousers. Only in the twentieth century was this abandoned—but in one direction, since, even today, men do not wear skirts, despite some attempts by fashion designers. This does not indicate that trousers are more natural for men, but that in the West, they denote supremacy and masculinity. From the late Middle Ages onwards, increasing emphasis was put on gender differentiation

Yamamoto, Yohji*

Patricia Mears

Source: The Berg Companion to Fashion 2010

Encyclopedia entry

Yamamoto was born in Tokyo on 3 October 1943. He never knew his father, who died in Manchuria during World War II; he was reared by his widowed mother Yumi. A dressmaker by trade, Yumi suffered what Yamamoto recalls as the indignities of a highly skilled worker whose gender and station in life afforded her little opportunity to make a rewarding living or to obtain recognition for her talents. Yumi encouraged her son to become an attorney—he graduated with a law degree from Keio University but nev

Comme des Garçons: Ex Oriente Lux

Barbara Vinken

Translated by Mark Hewson

Source: Fashion Zeitgeist. Trends and Cycles in the Fashion System 2005

Book chapter

Type 2: Rei Kawakubo, Issey Miyake, and Yohji Yamamoto Construction of the Japanese Avant-Garde Fashion

Yuniya Kawamura

Source: The Japanese Revolution in Paris Fashion. Dress, Body, Culture 2004

Book chapter

Miyake was born in Hiroshima in 1939, the same year as Kenzo. Unlike Kenzo and Yamamoto who formally studied fashion at Bunka School of Fashion, Miyake graduated from one of art universities, Tama University, where he majored in graphic design. In 1965, after graduating from Tama, he went to Paris, three months after Kenzo. They knew each other in Tokyo (Quinn 1984: 12), and both studied tailoring and dressmaking at l’Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture for a year. In 1966, he landed an a

Seven: Japanese Innovation

Bradley Quinn

Source: Techno Fashion 2002

Book chapter

‘Body becomes dress becomes body,’ proclaimed Rei Kawakubo, as she tried to sum up her radical perception of clothes and their function.Rei Kawakubo was interviewed by Susannah Frankel in her book, Fashion Visionaries (2001), London: V&A Publications, p. 154. Blurring the boundaries between dress and the body itself is typical for her; it has been central to her work for three decades. Ever since she made her debut in Paris her enigmatic and provocative collections have sent shock waves resonatin

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