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“58% Don’t Want Pershing” T-Shirt, Katherine Hamnett, 1984

Jessica Draper

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Fashion designer Katherine Hamnett has cleverly employed fashion as a vessel to carry a political message from early in her career, including the infamous T-shirt “58% Don’t Want Pershing,” in which she was photographed meeting the British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher, in 1984. Concealing the shirt under a jacket and revealing it at the last moment was a masterstroke of publicity, both for Hamnett’s brand and her wider concerns. Hamnett has continued her political activism through her fashio

Chanel Haute Couture, Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Shown at the Palais Garnier in Paris, home of the national opera, this fashion show was the most lavish and over-the-top fashion event in Paris at the time and began Karl Lagerfeld’s tradition of showmanship and set design. As with Karl’s first Chanel collection, this collection was panned for its deviation from Chanel’s trademark of easy comfort, with the classic Chanel suit made in a fitted silhouette that outlined the derrière. But it was also praised by others for updating Chanel’s image from

Bill Blass, Spring/Summer 1984

Michelle Honig

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

This collection was all about simplicity, which led Nina Hyde at the Washington Post to comment, “Blass’s clothes have never been more simple, less contrived.” The hems were short because Blass believed that his couture customers had the money to keep their body in great shape. There were bra-like tops under conservative suits for day, and evening gowns in silk charmeuse draped in silk chiffon. Because of the simplicity of the clothes, the models’ hair was more extreme. Critics commended Blass’s

Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

While most of de Castelbajac’s 1984 spring/summer contained serious and sensible clothes, the finale included a number of rectangular silk dresses screen-printed with images of household items such as US dollar bills, calculators, cigarette packs, and Warholian cans of Campbell’s soup. This was not the first time that de Castelbajac had shown these unconventionally shaped dresses—his previous collection had contained dresses emblazoned with internationally famous faces such as that of Charles de

Zandra Rhodes, Spring/Summer 1984

Veronica Maldonado

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Rhodes’s spring/summer 1984 collection made its debut in London’s Ritz Carlton hotel. Having studied textiles before designing fashion, Rhodes’s garments utilize fabric with a high degree of detail and craftsmanship. This collection was no exception, with dresses made of embroidered chiffon, metallic sequined ensembles, and dresses encrusted with hanging pearls and crystals, all in pastel color schemes accented with blazes of magenta and deep cerulean. While a few typical 1980s body-conscious, sh

Vivienne Westwood, Spring/Summer 1984

Lucy Moyse

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Models raise their hands in the air as victorious athletes. The stripes that accent their clothing increase the perception of speed and movement as they walk the catwalk, sportily kicking the air as they traverse. Vivienne Westwood’s spring/summer collection of 1984 was named after the ancient Greek personification of sleep, Hypnos, yet deliberately contrasted its namesake with bold, illuminating, and awakening flashes of neon, in a gesture of defiance that is typical of Westwood’s oeuvre.

Ungaro, Spring/Summer 1984

Vanessa Semmens

Source: Fashion Photography Archive 2015

Article

Emanuel Ungaro’s spring/summer 1984 show in Paris was significant for a number of reasons. As a couturier, and a highly regarded one, he was a big part of the conversation in Parisian couture and close attention was paid to his shows—both ready-to-wear and couture. This attention meant that he garnered a lot of press, and his spring/summer collection for 1984 was well received as it showed the wide range of his designs. This collection was typical of Ungaro, not only for the racerback styles but

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